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Raisins or no raisins?


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Oh heck - right - have always offered raisins - had never given it a second thought........

I can't offer cheese as I have two with dairy allergies - I'm certainly not going down the route of 'special' cheese for them - does that sound really mean - I think perhaps it does :blink:

Thinking about this - we have a lovely dental hygienist visit us and she 'approves' of raisins.......

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No raisins for us since we did a healthy foods accreditation. also banning lunch drinks this term. No one dilutes juice 1-10 as asked and I get fed up with drink leaking from the trolley and cartons half full left for us to dispose. We will give water with lunches.

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We offer raisins as yes they're sugary but have goodness too and the children love them! We had an oral health presentation at our latest forum meeting and I was shocked at how much sugar is in milk - more than weak squash, we offer milk, water or weak squash (provided by us and very weak!!) although they did say they shouldn't have milk or squash between meals ideally. The main problem apparently is children using the wrong toothpaste for their age or parents buying cheap or character toothpastes which don't have the correct fluoride levels - very interesting!

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My delivery from Tesco arrived today with a big bag of raisins. I used to buy them in bulk from an organic retailer along with apricots, but they have become so expensive that I can no longer justify it. So, a few raisins, and milk or water. No squash.

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Well we have Tesco value sultanas instead of raisins actually. Big bag for under a pound - they are juicier and much nicer than raisins. I think the problem with them, as opposed to apple etc. is that they stick to teeth and more likely in between teeth, which other fruits generally don't.

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Guest sn0wdr0p

Oh no! Another mention of Christmas. It's not only me in trouble then Narnia. That's two threads now so I might try and sneak it into another one.

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We base our nursery lunches on recommendations from the Catherine Walker Trust - the recommendation from here is that dried fruit is OK but not as a snack served in isolation - it should be served as part of a meal e.g., rice pudding and raisins and that any dried fruit with added sugar or vegetable oil should be avoided

The CHEW pictorial resources which I think can be downloaded for free are quite useful and in terms of portion sizes for some of our parents they have been a bit of an eye opener. I have put the link here for info.

http://www.cwt.org.uk/publications.html

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Thanks for all your interesting replies, I have to say I think we may continue to offer them as the children really do like them and as someone has said, some will only eat them and a little cheese. Until someone says you MUST NOT let children eat them we will continue to offer them as part of a healthy and varied snack.

narnia the mention of the C word did not escape me, you must stop!!! :ph34r:

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narnia the mention of the C word did not escape me, you must stop!!! :ph34r:

 

Oh dear, I fear now the C word has escaped it will be very difficult to get it back into the loft until a more appropriate time - everybody must be on the look out for it and try to capture it

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Who, exactly, has deemed that raisins are no longer a healthy option?

Ofsted. There are a raft of new measures and standards to protect children from this insidious fruit. Apparantly, they must be over a certain size, but you and you alone must make the decision as to what that size is, since there is actually no official guidance on this. And lord alone help you if any unauthorised raisins slip onto the premises when you aren't looking. Vigilence is the key here, sign them all in to your visitors book. Do not leave them where children might be alone with them ;)

Edited by narnia
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Ofsted. There are a raft of new measures and standards to protect children from this insidious fruit. Apparantly, they must be over a certain size, but you and you alone must make the decision as to what that size is, since there is actually no official guidance on this. And lord alone help you if any unauthorised raisins slip onto the premises when you aren't looking. Vigilence is the key here, sign them all in to your visitors book. Do not leave them where children might be alone with them ;)

But here's the thing.

 

ALL fruit has sugar in it.

 

I find this has become a real society pressure point. Like one week the food is good for you because it battles a disease then the next it's bad for you because it causes another disease.

 

End of the day, you only live once and you never know what's around the corner. If you want to eat raisins, eat the raisins!!!

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