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New EYFS guide


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Ooh! Wonder what everyone is going to make of this?

 

On first glance it looks very streamlined, the language is clear (not willing to say 'unambiguous' at this stage!), although I can see a glitch in the presentation already...

 

Going off for a read. :1b

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I've just had a quick glance having not read the DM for an age.

When it was first published was it because someone decided we didnt know enough about child development or was it to help us with a quick glance sheet?

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Wait for me....................................

 

 

wheeeee..................................................................................

 

 

 

:o splat!

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Why oh why is my thoughts.!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

And more importantly how much has this cost to produce.

Are we as practitioners really saying to the powers that be that we need a non statutory guide checklist.

Sorry but am I missing something vital here, or is there another piece to this bewildering puzzle to follow.:(

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If it's not in the statutory framework you can use what you like. Carry on with DM or use this - it's up to you. Ofsted will look at whatever you have and will probably use this to align children's assessments with their observations but it's the same as DM so that's not a problem.

 

DM included guidance and this is just called outcomes. One was to help, this is to judge. That's the DfE for you.

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From Nursery World, 10.09.13:

Helen Moylett and Nancy Stewart, co-authors of DM, say that the new version does not support child development and that it does not include guidance to highlight that it should not be used as a checklist or used prescriptively because children ‘develop at their own rates and in their own ways’.

Nancy Stewart, principal consultant at the Early Learning Consultancy, said, ‘This is precisely an extract from "Development Matters". It has the same status as "Development Matters", since both are non-statutory guidance. I would suggest that practitioners continue to use the much more helpful full version in "Development Matters" rather than just this extract, and that knowledgeable Ofsted inspectors might choose to continue to refer to it as well.’

She added, ‘By leaving out any mention of the pedagogy, this cut-down document fails to meet its stated purpose of supporting an understanding of child development. Development doesn’t just happen, and isn’t simply outcomes to judge children on. It is instead an interactive process and so the quality of relationships and environments are a critical part of the story.

‘Leaving out the characteristics of effective learning, presumably because they cannot be quantified, also misses the importance of knowing how children learn and continually supporting them to be strong, motivated and independent learners. In many ways this is the most important part of child development and of practitioners’ job, so it is a crucial omission.’

She added that the Unique Child statements could be used to consider children’s attainment and progress, but do not support or give consideration to the quality of practice and provision.

Co-author Helen Moylett added that the characteristics of effective learning remain in the stautory framework. ‘It’s worth noting that the EYFS statutory framework s1.10 still requires the following: in planning and guiding children’s activities, practitioners must reflect on the different ways that children learn and reflect these in their practice. Three characteristics of effective teaching and learning are: playing and exploring - children investigate and experience things, and "have a go"; active learning - children concentrate and keep on trying if they encounter difficulties, and enjoy achievements; and creating and thinking critically - children have and develop their own ideas, make links between ideas, and develop strategies for doing things.’

A DfE spokesperson said, ‘ "Early years outcomes" helps professionals measure a child’s development through the early years. We trust professionals to use their judgement about how to support children in these crucial, formative years.’

Edited by Wildflowers
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just a waste of more paper as far as im concerned (sorry having a bad day) - they have just re published the same format in a different order without the helpful hints - so that we can go back to "teaching" not play based learning as far as I can see!!!!!!!!!!!!

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