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Hi Guys

I'm hoping you can help with a dilemma......

We seem to have an ever growing list from parents of things they don't choose to have their children eat. This is starting to cause issues at snack, lunch, activities etc.

For example I have one who only wants goats milk, 3 no dairy, 2 only soya, 1 unsweetened soya, 2 almond milk..... Where does this end!

What do you do? They are not allergies or cultural diets but purely parents preferences for the child.

Purchasing all these milk products is expensive, causes lots of waste, make every session complicated.

What do/would you all do?

Thanks

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Yes that's my thought. I am all for working with parents/carers but you cannot be expected to provide all of these. The almond milk would certainly be a no no due to children with severe nut allergies also with us.

Our food/drink policy and prospectus clearly states what the setting provides for snack.

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One of the main issues is all the other children drink the milk provided by the government. It's out for them to help themselves. The children who's parents prefer not for them to drink dairy milk get upset that they want some milk.

It's playing on my mind that due to the minority we are not allowing other children the independence of helping themselves to milk as I can't keep it out.

Cooking is becoming tricky as we seem to have to cook different batches of everything.

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I'm sorry but if you say these are only preferences, then they can give them those at home or provide them.

It is absolutely ridiculous to expect you to do this. The next thing they will be saying is they only eat Waitrose bread instead of Aldi or

Tescos.

You might want to consider introducing a document that clearly states what the setting will provide,

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Because you are part of the milk scheme, offer one alternative to cows milk. Not goat, soya, almond or oat milk as some children have allergies or intolerances related to dairy, soya, nuts or gluten.
I would choose unsweetened rice milk as most children can drink it. (Or just provide water...)

Edited by Wildflowers
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Although I hate to say it but what will happen when these children move onto primary school - will that choice be on offer there? We offer a choice of cows milk or water (subject to food allergies).

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We have had 1 child a few years ago who's mum wanted different milk to the normal that we provide - she provided it in the original bottle and we put the child's name on it and then gave it her back at the end of the week, it was easy for us to manage as we all sit for snack together.

As I volunteer in a primary school I know that they also used the same system when the child transferred to them.

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I'm afraid we take a hard line on this. We obviously accept religious preferences, we accommodate for vegetarians, and we will of course do what ever it takes to cope with allergies and medical needs, but we make it clear that other than this, we will not accept anything except a doctors note.

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I'm afraid we take a hard line on this. We obviously accept religious preferences, we accommodate for vegetarians, and we will of course do what ever it takes to cope with allergies and medical needs, but we make it clear that other than this, we will not accept anything except a doctors note.

have to say i'm in this camp too...parents have to be taught to stick to some rules! and to understand that we cannot and will not monitor all these things. Having an allergy is one thing but without proof then their child should be drinking water.... sorry appear slightly stroppy here but it's quite ridiculous IMO and I have two children with dairy intolerance!

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Thank you all so much it's nice to know you all feel as I do about this subject....it's just becoming ridiculous.

 

Can I ask what are your thoughts on cooking due to this? Would you just cook for the experience and send it home so mum can pick it they eat the item that perhaps has dairy milk rather than goats (which was only a preference not an allergy or medical need) ?

 

Thank you all ?

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Thank you all so much it's nice to know you all feel as I do about this subject....it's just becoming ridiculous.

 

Can I ask what are your thoughts on cooking due to this? Would you just cook for the experience and send it home so mum can pick it they eat the item that perhaps has dairy milk rather than goats (which was only a preference not an allergy or medical need) ?

 

Thank you all

Quite a lot of children who may be intolerant to milk have no issue when it is used in cooked items. All food we cook goes home for parents to make decisions ! Think its probably a good idea with new allergy info to post the ingredients on the door anyway

 

had a parent moan last term that her childminder was unable to say no to her children so could I stop giving them their things!

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One of the main issues is all the other children drink the milk provided by the government. It's out for them to help themselves. The children who's parents prefer not for them to drink dairy milk get upset that they want some milk.

It's playing on my mind that due to the minority we are not allowing other children the independence of helping themselves to milk as I can't keep it out.

Cooking is becoming tricky as we seem to have to cook different batches of everything.

Always impressed when I hear of settings that leave milk out to help themselves!!! Do you have 2year olds Thumper?

And hows it done?

Edited by Rafa
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Yes we do have 2yr olds. We decant milk into small jugs and only 1/2 fill them so if they spill it there's not to much waste or mess!

It's amazing how quickly the 2yr olds gain the control to skillfuly pour themselves a cup of milk. ?

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Yes we do have 2yr olds. We decant milk into small jugs and only 1/2 fill them so if they spill it there's not to much waste or mess!

It's amazing how quickly the 2yr olds gain the control to skillfuly pour themselves a cup of milk.

we always have water available for children to access but didnt think about milk - how do you keep it cool ?

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Thumper I agree that in group care we cannot be flexible enough to cope with some of the ideals some parents have. In cases of real need eg medical, allergy or intolerance, I would allow alternative milks and I do alternative purchases with parents. They buy one week I buy the next. And of course when I buy the other children have the opportunity to try a different milk.

But I do ask/insist on written evidence from doctor or dietician.

At the moment I am in a bit of trouble with a parent who is accusing me of not believing her about her child's allergy/intolerance and is very, very angry about it. But funnily enough the dietician and, doctor are refusing to write. Mum says it is because they are too busy but I have pointed out they have sent me a proforma on previous occasions with other children. Wish me luck on this one.

In terms of cooking I do try to use alternatives where possible and it sometimes does take a bit of practice. Bake off next week is Free From so could be worth watching to take tips.

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Frankly, once they are in school there will be milk or water in the majority of places I go into. There just isn't the time/space/storage facilties in the average nursery/reception classroom to accomodate anything else. Water is all that is stipulated in the stat framework anyway.

Cx

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But I do ask/insist on written evidence from doctor or dietician.

At the moment I am in a bit of trouble with a parent who is accusing me of not believing her about her child's allergy/intolerance and is very, very angry about it. But funnily enough the dietician and, doctor are refusing to write. Mum says it is because they are too busy but I have pointed out they have sent me a proforma on previous occasions with other children.

Yeah I'd be sketchy on that one too. Any Dr will happily write a letter if you require one.

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Lkeyleach; could you Ask parent if it's ok for you to phone Dr or HV, I have on a few occasions and After my working together introduction to the conversation I've always had a positive response from Dr and never come up against a problem in contacting HV. xx

Edited by Foreveryoung
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