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socket covers


dianneh
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well, you don't HAVE to, but we have ours covered, only because one of the children we had a few years ago, was found by his dad, shoving two screwdrivers into the socket holes..............and was about to shove the third one in!!!!!!!!

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I was told by an Ofsted inspector that the covers themselves can be turned round and other implements stuck in the hole will then make it live. Children surely see them everywhere they go and the less attention turned to them the better. As long as adults are vigilant children should be safe.

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On a first aid course I finished on Thursday they said you don't need them if you've got an rcd (if that's what it's called!!?) circuit board with trip switches. If this is the case there is absolutely no way a child could come to any harm even if they shoved 3 metal things in at once! It will always trip before any harm comes to the person. Personally though I am still leaving ours in as I can see there is still a chance of them shoving bits in there which could get stuck and be a nuisance!

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Tell you what..................YOU do it, I'll come and watch! I'd love to have been at your first aid course.....the trainer is an idiot. 'IF you have a RCB'..............., Personally, I'm not about to take any kind of risks with any child in my care........ever. You don't have to have the coves, it's true, but I choose to put them on and they are very had to get off.......unbelievable first aider!

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I second Narnia. Quite frankly are we now to be qualified electricians to know whether the RCB is in fact certified? And that is if you have one. I cover all sockets and yes they are a pain to get out. Goodness, if Ofsted are looking at whether sockets covers can be turned around Phoebe123, I am concerned they have lost the plot! Quite frankly I would have challenged them to give me a demonstration on turning them around and sticking something in.

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We use them and will continue to do , prevention is better than cure or death ! Saying that our electrician did mention the other week that they cause more harm as they are not properly designed and therefore forced in which can cause damage to the socket in turn making it more dangerous. Trust your instinct and common sense -

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'Normally it is quite difficult to find an object which will do that, and stay in place'.

Um 'Normally' doesn't mean impossible does it, and i'm not convinced that if a child could turn the socket cover around and just push the top pin in then they couldn't find other things to do the same, why not just make them with out the top pin (some how), i dont see how you'd get one of the bottom pins in the top hole because of the angles and the other pin not allowing one to go in by itself...no expert obviously

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We do not use the covers, and I have very easily been able to insert one upside down to test the theory. (It was done with one from a major chain outlet, although I did have trouble with a much older style cover)

That said, we do try and ensure our sockets are covered by our units anyway.

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this is a statement from a not so long ago ofsted inspection -

'In addition, staff do not fully demonstrate an awareness of the potential hazards of children being able

to touch electric switches' - interesting if there's no danger ?
Someone ...ofsted, county, gov should step up and say you should/shouldn't have them before a setting makes the wrong call one way or the other and doesn't have a leg to stand on :(
Edited by Mouseketeer
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Well- our socket all have covers in them and quite frankly it takes us so long to take one out that (always end up breaking nails on them) that for a child to be unsupervised for long enough to not only take it out but then turn it around and put back in I find difficult to believe.I woul dhope that no child in my care was ever ignored for long enough to do all that.

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I think as professionals we have to take charge of our own settings and not become fearful of the supposed 'powers that be.' I think in Early Years we need to stand up for what we know is right for our setting due to our experience and working on a day to day basis rather than accept the recommendations of those that perhaps have no experience or idea of what it is like to work with children in an individual nursery/pre-school.

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I think that unless you can box cover the whole thing, there is no way of making a socket totally safe. Plugs could be partly removed, children with wet hands from water play could poke or switch. There used to be plastic covers that hinged over the whole thing that clipped into place.

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

UPDATE: Just read this in an Ofsted report. I am guessing it was highlighted as the risk assessment said sockets should be covered and were not, wonder if it would have been noted if it was omitted completely.

For example, the safety check for the day of the inspection, states that electric sockets are safe, however, a number of safety covers are missing.

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