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Professional Love policy


tigger23
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In what context? It seems very bizarre. Could they explain what it is and where it mentions it in the standards?

 

I was told to write an exclusion policy by an inspector once, so I wrote in to Nursery World magazine and got my letter published. I got a lot of good feedback too! That was in the days before this fabulous forum!

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Thank you for the welcome.

 

It was related to the fact that if children wants a cuddle then practitioners responded. Likewise during the inspection a child who was 3 told their key carer they 'loved' them. The inspector said Nurseries were beginning to put these policies in place to keep them safe. I googled it, and The University of Sheffield have produced a report summary following a study they did at Fennies day nursery. However in my local area I can't find any settings who have a professional love policy.

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This was brought up at my latest Safeguarding update for Lead Safeguarding, by the trainer, however, she did not mention having a policy about it. Professional love is what we having been giving for years, it just now as a new "buzz" word expression for it!

 

I think it is something that could be added to an existing policy, on Staff Behaviour, Child Protection/Safeguarding.

Edited by Panders
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A what now!! It's simple for me, if a child tells me they love me, I tell them I love them back and they can have as many cuddles as they want. The minute someone tells me that's not allowed is the day I give up this job.

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I think we have something in behaviour management and code of conduct. Not much to be fair. More about how young children need physical contact. It does not state how when etc. I have been on training where it was said that we should have written guidelines on what this 'should look like'. I believe some schools have Touch Policies.

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A what now!! It's simple for me, if a child tells me they love me, I tell them I love them back and they can have as many cuddles as they want. The minute someone tells me that's not allowed is the day I give up this job.

I don't think anyone is suggesting that zigzag, quite the opposite in fact - just the need to protect staff from any allegations that's all.

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I don't think anyone is suggesting that zigzag, quite the opposite in fact - just the need to protect staff from any allegations that's all.

Phew, sorry must have got my wires crossed with this one! We do have a professional code of physical conduct (I just call it common sense) so I guess that would cover it. I totally agree with lynned55 that it is a terrible term to use.

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It isn't on any list from the PSLA (and I can tell you as I've JUST finished updating my policies. I do think we have to be careful...we cannot legislate for everything.....and as for school touch policies we have one in place in our local school....children are not allowed cuddles ...are not to be picked up....are not to be physically comforted...in fact are to be discouraged in any way of being emotionally appropriate! :(:( :( :angry: we had a young lad with AS Difficulties some years ago who was comforted by stroking the back of his hand (it was in his statement!) the school refused and accused me of abuse! :angry: (goes off muttering :ph34r: .......)

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It isn't on any list from the PSLA (and I can tell you as I've JUST finished updating my policies. I do think we have to be careful...we cannot legislate for everything.....and as for school touch policies we have one in place in our local school....children are not allowed cuddles ...are not to be picked up....are not to be physically comforted...in fact are to be discouraged in any way of being emotionally appropriate! :(:( :( :angry: we had a young lad with AS Difficulties some years ago who was comforted by stroking the back of his hand (it was in his statement!) the school refused and accused me of abuse! :angry: (goes off muttering :ph34r: .......)

Agreed

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I can't believe you don't already have one narnia, you're welcome to adopt this one :-)

 

Breathing Policy:

 

If your child breathes I will ensure that the air around him/her is clean and free from dirt and suitable to breathe. I will do this by carrying out a detailed risk assessment, every hour on the hour. Air will be checked against my current 5 point risk assessment:

 

1. Is the air at the correct temperature?

2. Is the air contaminated with dust or other things? (flying insects will be excluded as they come under my Insect Risk Assessment)

3. Is there enough air for each child and adult in the room?

4. Would it be possible for a child to lose their air at any point? If so what action would need to be taken?

 

My current short term plan is to breathe as often as possible, this is also reflected within my medium and long term plans. Once your child shows interest in breathing my future plans is to encourage them to continue with regular practice.

 

If your child arrives having breathed dirty air you will be required to sign an 'exisiting contamination form'. These will need to be completed in triplicate. One for the file, two for the bin. (This is to comply with current Ofsted paper wasting criteria)

 

Children will be encouraged to breathe at all times and their experience noted and recorded against the 7 Areas of learning.

 

If your child refuses to breathe I will have to notify Ofsted and you must collect them immediately. Again triplicate recording will be required.

 

I must ensure that all breathing meets the EYFS, therefore we will practice breathing at all minutes of the day.

 

Please discuss breathing with your child and encourage them to breathe while in my care.

 

Coughs and sneezes will be considered acceptable forms of breathing, however you must sign a form to say that you will allow this.

 

You must also sign a parental permission form that allows me to let your child breathe during his/her time in my care, failure to do so will result in me not being able to allow your child to breathe and this could be detrimental to their care. (As this will not meet the Welfare Requirements you will therefore need to confirm (in triplicate) that you want to withdrawl your child from EYFS).

 

This is my breathing procedure: in, out, in, out, in, out. However, if after completing regular observations I feel this doesn't meet your child's particular interests and they would prefer out, in, in out, out (or similar) I will speak to you to make other arrangements.

 

 

Thank your for your understanding.

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I've asked Ofsted ... I'll let you know

Gill Jones has responded: "What? The only policies needed are clearly stated in the EYFS",

Gill would also like further information. I shall DM Tigger23 who has started the thread and leave it with them if they would like to take it further with Gill, it is not for us to speculate but the Ofsted position as far as I can see is clear, sensible and what we already knew.

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Gill Jones has responded: "What? The only policies needed are clearly stated in the EYFS",

Gill would also like further information. I shall DM Tigger23 who has started the thread and leave it with them if they would like to take it further with Gill, it is not for us to speculate but the Ofsted position as far as I can see is clear, sensible and what we already knew.

Ms Jones needs to filter this information back down to her inspectors.

Its all very well telling us that the only policies required are clearly stated in EYFS- we know this- she needs to be telling the inspectors.

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Mouseketeer, do you have separate breathing policy for outdoor play? I would be expecting regular 'testing of air quality' every hour and recorded on a specially designed grid to be stored in a filing cabinet for 25 years.

 

Sorry tiger 23, we seem to have gone off on a tangent - not like us at all!

Edited by lsp
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I can't believe you don't already have one narnia, you're welcome to adopt this one :-)

Breathing Policy:

If your child breathes I will ensure that the air around him/her is clean and free from dirt and suitable to breathe. I will do this by carrying out a detailed risk assessment, every hour on the hour. Air will be checked against my current 5 point risk assessment:

1. Is the air at the correct temperature?

2. Is the air contaminated with dust or other things? (flying insects will be excluded as they come under my Insect Risk Assessment)

3. Is there enough air for each child and adult in the room?

4. Would it be possible for a child to lose their air at any point? If so what action would need to be taken?

My current short term plan is to breathe as often as possible, this is also reflected within my medium and long term plans. Once your child shows interest in breathing my future plans is to encourage them to continue with regular practice.

If your child arrives having breathed dirty air you will be required to sign an 'exisiting contamination form'. These will need to be completed in triplicate. One for the file, two for the bin. (This is to comply with current Ofsted paper wasting criteria)

Children will be encouraged to breathe at all times and their experience noted and recorded against the 7 Areas of learning.

If your child refuses to breathe I will have to notify Ofsted and you must collect them immediately. Again triplicate recording will be required.

I must ensure that all breathing meets the EYFS, therefore we will practice breathing at all minutes of the day.

Please discuss breathing with your child and encourage them to breathe while in my care.

Coughs and sneezes will be considered acceptable forms of breathing, however you must sign a form to say that you will allow this.

You must also sign a parental permission form that allows me to let your child breathe during his/her time in my care, failure to do so will result in me not being able to allow your child to breathe and this could be detrimental to their care. (As this will not meet the Welfare Requirements you will therefore need to confirm (in triplicate) that you want to withdrawl your child from EYFS).

This is my breathing procedure: in, out, in, out, in, out. However, if after completing regular observations I feel this doesn't meet your child's particular interests and they would prefer out, in, in out, out (or similar) I will speak to you to make other arrangements.

Thank your for your understanding.

I can't believe you don't already have one narnia, you're welcome to adopt this one :-)

Breathing Policy:

If your child breathes I will ensure that the air around him/her is clean and free from dirt and suitable to breathe. I will do this by carrying out a detailed risk assessment, every hour on the hour. Air will be checked against my current 5 point risk assessment:

1. Is the air at the correct temperature?

2. Is the air contaminated with dust or other things? (flying insects will be excluded as they come under my Insect Risk Assessment)

3. Is there enough air for each child and adult in the room?

4. Would it be possible for a child to lose their air at any point? If so what action would need to be taken?

My current short term plan is to breathe as often as possible, this is also reflected within my medium and long term plans. Once your child shows interest in breathing my future plans is to encourage them to continue with regular practice.

If your child arrives having breathed dirty air you will be required to sign an 'exisiting contamination form'. These will need to be completed in triplicate. One for the file, two for the bin. (This is to comply with current Ofsted paper wasting criteria)

Children will be encouraged to breathe at all times and their experience noted and recorded against the 7 Areas of learning.

If your child refuses to breathe I will have to notify Ofsted and you must collect them immediately. Again triplicate recording will be required.

I must ensure that all breathing meets the EYFS, therefore we will practice breathing at all minutes of the day.

Please discuss breathing with your child and encourage them to breathe while in my care.

Coughs and sneezes will be considered acceptable forms of breathing, however you must sign a form to say that you will allow this.

You must also sign a parental permission form that allows me to let your child breathe during his/her time in my care, failure to do so will result in me not being able to allow your child to breathe and this could be detrimental to their care. (As this will not meet the Welfare Requirements you will therefore need to confirm (in triplicate) that you want to withdrawl your child from EYFS).

This is my breathing procedure: in, out, in, out, in, out. However, if after completing regular observations I feel this doesn't meet your child's particular interests and they would prefer out, in, in out, out (or similar) I will speak to you to make other arrangements.

Thank your for your understanding.

Fabulous. This made me chuckle.

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We could adopt the Australian policy of no caffeinated drinks for staff or pupils......if of course you want me to go COMPLETELY bonkers!!!! ....KEEP CALM AND HAVE A COFFEE!

 

 

Ohps sorry seems to be too late policies have driven me mad already :wacko: :blink:

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Can we just take a step back and remind ourselves what the original question was? :1b

'(we) were told we should have a professional love policy in nursery'

It's important to remember that Ofsted are much more open and transparent than they ever have been before and yesterday we had a response to our question within a working day of us asking it. We have worked hard to forge these open lines of communication and we will always ask the questions as they are posed and post the answers as they are given.

We are trying to follow up with Ofsted and ask what providers should do if they feel they are being asked to provide something outside the statutory framework, we'll keep you informed. :1b

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I have heard back from Gill Jones regarding the comments on this thread that inspectors have asked for documents outside the statutory framework:

"I will feed this into our next training. If I knew who it was that did the inspection I could go to them directly, because the only policies that should be requested are those in the EYFS. If the provider raises a concern during the inspection, the inspector should note it in the tool kit - it usually is, but providers can request that it is done. The provider can also ring Ofsted directly to register that concern as long as they have raised the concern with the inspector first. Inspectors are told to listen to concerns and to try to resolve any issues on site during the inspection. Providers can email, but that won't be dealt with until after the inspection, as we don't as a rule contact the inspector while on inspection unless there is a safeguarding issue"

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