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Accident Records


JJA
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Just finding out what everyone considers an 'accident' to be and when they get recorded and reported to parents.

I am finding that we have sooo many accident records at the end of a day and half of these I wouldn't (as a parent) really have expected a form to sign. What about your setting?

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Some kind of first aid is administered. If it's a there there and a quick look and a rub it better scenario, then I don't put it down in the accident book.

 

If however, we have had to clean it up, put Mr. Bump on it, considerable amount of tears and comfort and any type of head injury, then we do write it up.

 

That's sounds pretty general, but that's what we get mostly, a trip, a bump type of accident,

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Same as Panda, Although even if it's a 'rub and a there there' we still note the time, then verbally tell parents - If the parent wants it written up we do.

 

I've had a cull on our 'accident form' this summer. After reading the PLSA retention times, we decided we were being overly finicky with them! Have kept any head bumps, actual cuts and things needing any kind of follow ups,. But once the child has left us three years we have got rid of really minor things- grazed knees etc,

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Similar approach here, if there is any break to the skin or mark we generally write it up and particularly if caused by another child. The only exception would probably be grazed knees which we notify verbally, but it does depend on the parent. We tell parents of any bump or injury to the head by phone.

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won't bore you all again with the reasons why..............................but EVERY single bump, knock, graze, scrape........not to is to leave you open to malicious allegations. Boring?? Maybe, but it could save you a lot of time and trouble with the 'O'people.........as I know to my huge relief.

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I now set up an A4 sheet for accidents from setting and accidents from home with 4 boxes per page, when a child has their first accident their name and DOB is added, and further accidents get added to the one sheet (or more if really accident prone :-/) it makes it easy to monitor how frequent accidents are happening.

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I now set up an A4 sheet for accidents from setting and accidents from home with 4 boxes per page, when a child has their first accident their name and DOB is added, and further accidents get added to the one sheet (or more if really accident prone :-/) it makes it easy to monitor how frequent accidents are happening.

Do you get parents to sign? are pages numbered and do you do it in alphabetical order so you can find them quickly? (sorry just being nosey! ;) )

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yes parents sign each accident box as it's recorded, they are in alphabetical order, the long and short sides are both hole punched, if a member of staff completes one for signing they they turn it around in the folder so whoever is seeing chn out can quickly see if there are forms for parents to sign, they remove the sheet to get signed then put back in the right place/way. We don't give copies for everything little thing but complete a separate one and give to parents if its needed.

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ours is the one with the body map - we get parents to sign as appropriate - if it is a head accident we copy it and give a copy to the parent with a letter giving parents symptoms to look out for in case of concussion etc.,

 

we do write lots of accident forms but i rather be sfe than sorry.

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ours is the one with the body map - we get parents to sign as appropriate - if it is a head accident we copy it and give a copy to the parent with a letter giving parents symptoms to look out for in case of concussion etc.,

 

we do write lots of accident forms but i rather be sfe than sorry.

 

We have 90% of our families with English as their second or other language, and some parents are not literate in their home language or English.

 

We use an accident form with a body map, and use google translate to translate 1 sentence at a time (and back into English to check it means what I want it to mean) and write on the form under each section, and then copy it to send home, so the family have it in our original English and the best we can at the home language.

 

We also write lots of accident forms, but better safe than sorry and most families are very appreciative of the way we do them.

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We have 90% of our families with English as their second or other language, and some parents are not literate in their home language or English.

 

We use an accident form with a body map, and use google translate to translate 1 sentence at a time (and back into English to check it means what I want it to mean) and write on the form under each section, and then copy it to send home, so the family have it in our original English and the best we can at the home language.

 

We also write lots of accident forms, but better safe than sorry and most families are very appreciative of the way we do them.

Goodness me what a lot of extra work that must be. We have no other languages spoken or any multi cultural families so have never had to do this. I take my hat off to you!

 

I have a sheet that I have made up with all the usual details and each child has a named sheet. Each sheet includes the child's date of birth and is kept in alphabetical order so is quick to find. We write down anything that we administer first aid to, although due to a recent moan, we may now go for overkill and record literally everything.

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Goodness me what a lot of extra work that must be. We have no other languages spoken or any multi cultural families so have never had to do this. I take my hat off to you!

 

I have a sheet that I have made up with all the usual details and each child has a named sheet. Each sheet includes the child's date of birth and is kept in alphabetical order so is quick to find. We write down anything that we administer first aid to, although due to a recent moan, we may now go for overkill and record literally everything.

 

It does make more work, but it's easier to sit at the computer and translate it than try to use signs and other visual prompts to try to get Tanti Ioana who only speaks Romanian to understand that her nephew, little Andrei, bumped his knee in the garden ^_^ , and then to have to explain it again to little Andrei's dad when he brings him in the next day!

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