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Guest colechin
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Guest colechin

Wondering if anyone could help me please.

I am a PVI setting on a school site. One of the governors today asked if we would be interested in putting in place some antibacterial hand pumps for the Nursery children and their parents to use on our site. As the school are thinking of the same.

 

I think it is a good idea, maybe one in the outdoor play area and in the cloak room. The school feel that it would encourage the pupils more to keep their hands clean as they are receiving complaints from parents about a lot of tummy upsets.

 

Does anyone have any concerns on this matter or have some in place either in school or a nursery.

 

Look forward to hearing from some of you. x

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If it makes it easier to wash their hands, why not. I don't think it necessarily makes any difference if its anti-bacterial, it's the washing technique which makes the difference.

 

Is it going to be a commercial unit you are having installed? Non-touch etc.?

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I don't think it sounds like a bad idea, I take it it's the no water ones? You don't want to have a situation where children try and use this instead of hand washing though - that would be my only concern! Alongside cost as we use it for staff but it isn't cheap, I think having it so children could access could get costly!

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lots of info on the web about this

http://www.healthyanswers.com/healthy-aging/2009/12/hand-sanitizers/

personally i have some issues with it

First it is not recommended that anti-bacterial products are used for small children (the psla state that soap for little ones should not be anti-bac)

Second children with dermatitis and other skin conditions may be affected by these products

Third no alcohol based products should be used

fourthly ...they do not remove dirt!

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Guest colechin

Thank you for your responses. The dispensers were to be like the ones in hospitals.

I believe in the good old soap and water but, would also be happy to use non-alcoholic dispensers in and around the nursery unit, if the costs are not too high.

I feel a school assembly covering the reason why we wash our hands, would be best and maybe, the school could hire one of those light machine where you can put your hands under it, to see the dirt.

 

Once again thank you for you quick reply s.

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http://conversation.which.co.uk/energy-home/anti-bacterial-hand-gel-hand-washing-germ-killing/?utm_campaign=actionfb&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook&utm_content=&utm_term=&cmp=actionfb

 

was reading this earlier today.. personally would prefer not to have them.. they discourage proper hand washing. relying on the anti bac element.. and my big worry is that bugs will become resistant to them and mutate into something that could be a lot more serious..

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I think we're getting obsessed with anti bac-ing everything. :huh:

We use anti bac soap but I didnt know the PLA didnt recommend it, have you got a link to anything from them Finleysmaid?

I agree the use of the anti bac liquid can give a false sense of clean hands when in reality its a barrier to the germs isnt it?

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We tried hand gel in nursery for before snack and they used lots and wasted lots. It's very slippery when you stand in it! :blink:

We have an ongoing issue with children 'watering down' the liquid soap in the toilet area and are having new child friendly wall pumps to try and alleviate this! However for now, the caretaker and cleaner have decided to water down our soap due to our excessive usage, which worries me, especially as the children then water down the watered down :huh: Apparently we're not allowed proper soap ( no idea why)! ;)

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The children wouldn't be keeping their hands cleaner. They would just have fewer germs on them.

Hand sanitisers don't kill Norovirus.

Children need to learn to wash their hands at appropriate times and think about what is on them. They don't need to learn that, no matter how dirty their hands are, they are germ free.

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what i'm wondering is why the school want to do this...is there an issue with hygiene/infection rates or is this a govenor who doesn't understand all the implications (we do seem to have a society that is obsessed with 'cleanliness'.....that dettol washing machine advert drives me mad!)

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I am another person who is very against anti bac soaps. Every course I have been on relating to health and hygiene has started that they are a bad idea. A good quality soap that lathers up and moisturisers is best.

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(we do seem to have a society that is obsessed with 'cleanliness'.....that dettol washing machine advert drives me mad!)

Me too!

 

I just want to shout at the screen "Why would I need to sterilise my washing?" but I don't because it would frighten the dogs.

 

GRRRRR!

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Guest colechin

Once again thank you for the replies. The school are wanting to put them in due to the high number of children catching bugs, and they are finding more and more parents are complaining.

I have now had a meeting with the school head and some of the parent governors to explain the pros and cons but, it definitely has more cons. I am in the process of printing out pictures to laminate to go up in the infants toilets, a school assembly will be planned to cover the topic which I think should be fun and interactive with maybe, some teacher wearing germ/bug costumes but I think this will help to get the message over to the children and shows parents that the school is acting upon their concerns.

In my nursery, I do have walled soap dispensers which the children use and I will continue to use this along with a hand sanitizer when we are out on our walks.

Have a lovely weekend people. x

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there are lots of ideas out there for teaching hand washing etc...

one we used to help show spread of 'germs' was using glitter... a little on your hand, hold hands with another child for the glitter to transfer and then they did the same.. touch a couple of surfaces someone touches it and gets glitter on hands.. you get the picture... they then had to wash the glitter off using soap and water... and clean surfaces with a soapy cloth.. worked well and they often commented later when glitter that had not been fully cleaned away was still around days later...

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The easiest way to reduce infection rates IMO is to clean down door handles (inside and out) the push buttons or handles on the flush and the taps and press areas of the soap dispensers. I did infection control at college and these were always the danger zones (rather than the loo seat which was often much cleaner!!!)

Also fresh air and circulation ....it has been quoted that the most dangerous place for children is the classroom half an hour before break time!

Rea i'll get back to you about the psla thing (not on this computer!)

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The easiest way to reduce infection rates IMO is to clean down door handles (inside and out) the push buttons or handles on the flush and the taps and press areas of the soap dispensers. I did infection control at college and these were always the danger zones (rather than the loo seat which was often much cleaner!!!)

 

As above + parents observing 'rules' re bring sick children into the setting :ph34r:

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  • 2 weeks later...

We bought one of those infra-red lights that show up the areas that are not clean, after the children have washed. You give them gel for their hands, they have to wash it off and then they put their hands into the box with the light. I can't remember what they are called, but not a large cost and the gel lasts for ages

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