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administering of creams


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Hi need some advice I have a parent who wants aveeno cream put on her child as he has eczema and this helps, does the cream have to be prescribed ? In our policy it just states about prescribed medicines.

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We have had a few with aveeno and they have got it on prescription as then of course it's free! Personally I would still put on even if it wasn't prescribed as is just a moisturiser and can't 'overdose' them with it. As we do with nappy creams. Any other creams eg hydrocortisone etc I wouldn't unless prescribed as has specific dosage! Hope that helps!

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Guest sn0wdr0p

Ofsted published a fact sheet about administering medication a couple of years ago. It should still be available on their website. it gives information about using non prescribed medication.

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Guest sn0wdr0p

Gosh you found that quickly. I find the Ofsted website rather difficult to find info on.Not at work at the moment so couldn't remember it's title. I used it to help me create my medication policy and have a copy at the front of our medication file should staff want any clarification of points.

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Gosh you found that quickly. I find the Ofsted website rather difficult to find info on.Not at work at the moment so couldn't remember it's title. I used it to help me create my medication policy and have a copy at the front of our medication file should staff want any clarification of points.

It's on my lap-top! :1b

I agree trying to find what you need on O website can be 'tricky'! :ph34r:

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  • 1 year later...

From the Ofsted document:

"If you already have written permission to give a particular over-the-counter medication to a child, and you need to, you do not have to get written permission every time you give it. However, you may consider it good practice to ask the parent to sign the written record, which you must complete, to confirm that you have told them that you gave the agreed medication. This will allow you to prove you have let parents know that you gave the medication, as shown in the Statutory Framework."

From the EYFS:

"Medicine (both prescription and non-prescription) must only be administered to a child where written permission for that particular medicine has been obtained from the child’s parent and/or carer. Providers must keep a written record each time a medicine is administered to a child, and inform the child’s parents and/or carers on the same day, or as soon as reasonably practicable."

For over-the-counter creams, does this mean that we must:

- record each time time we have applied it

- inform parents of each time we have applied it, and for that reason, it is advisable to ask them to sign that they have been informed?

The Ofsted document calls it 'medication' and the EYFS 'medicine'. I can see that creams can be considered medication, but are they medicines? And if they are medication but not medicines, what to do regarding informing parents after each application? The creams I have in mind are to prevent or treat sunburn, nettle stings, bee stings, nappy rash and eczema.
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Don't apply any of those creams here. As we are a sessional setting, parents/carers can apply before attending.

Are these creams parent/carers are bringing in or ones you are considering having on your premises to use .:)

Any creams. We only keep sting cream, which we apply if needed, with parents' consent given when joining.

Some parents ask us to apply a cream they have provided, if needed, such as another cream for nettles and insects or a nappy rash - creams that cannot be applied in advance, as sunlotion.

I would follow EYFS Statutory Framework.

We only give prescribed medication - medicines, creams, inhalers etc.

Record every time given and parents sign when informed.

My issue is that I don't understand what is required by the EYFS - if we have to inform parents about each time we have applied cream - any cream, as we have for medicines and inhalers.

So you check if a cream provided by a parent has been recommended by a doctor, dentist, nurse or pharmacist? (Prescribed' means recommended, not necessarily on prescription, as explained in the Ofsted document.)

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If it is within your agreed policies to apply creams, I would get them to sign each time you applied it, apart from nappy cream which could be within your daily log or intimate care policy.

Like lots of other statutory frameworks / guidance it is so open to interpretation I'm afraid.::(:(

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We would only administer something that had a label with dosage and name of doctor etc and record usage. We will also use our suncream if needed providing parent has signed on their registration form. That is also noted on our daily sheet which parent will see when they collect their child. We are sessional so do not get that many incidents. We don't use anything else.

How old is the Ofsted advice. IMO it seems to contradict EYFS which is statutory so surely any inspector would expect you to record ALL medication prescription or over the counter and inform parents? That's how I read it anyway.

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I don't really see an instance when I wouldn't tell a parent I had put anything on their child - maybe not nappy rash cream if that is what they are providing the child's change bag - it's obviously in there for a reason. However, if I changed a child and clearly there was a nappy rash problem and they did not supply their own cream - then I wouldn't have any of our own to put on it and would mention to parent that there was a problem when they picked up, if child became really uncomfortable I would call parent in.

 

If we had a child with a wasp sting or bee sting, nettle sting they can be quite upsetting for the child but we don't keep cream for those either, we put on ice packs and call parents - wasp or bee sting they may have an allergic reaction to, so would prefer to have a parent on the way, so to speak.

 

That may be difficult for you as you are "forest" type school - maybe your parents are quite a long way away from you, I would get their blanket permission on the registration form to use a cream which you can provide - I cant imagine that you wouldn't tell a parent that their child had been stung - just have some pre-prepared forms photocopied so minimal amounts need to be written in each time and signed.

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Parents give their written and signed permission (or not) for creams, whether provided by us or them.

My question is in relation to the requirement to inform parents at the end of the day for any over-the-counter cream that can be considered prescribed (i.e. recommended by a professional) and being medication. (Currently, for us, this is cream against nettle stings and creams parents provide e.g. a natural cream for nettle stings, lip balm or nappy cream.) The reason I'm asking is that it's such a hassle to catch parents, or whoever is picking up the child, at the end of the day and ask them to sign a form.

I understand that it is a requirement to record and inform parents about medications that have been administered to a child and that asking them to sign the record is good practise. What is not clear to me is if these kinds of creams are considered to be medications.

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We stick with 'prescribed' medicines/medication only, sun screening cream being the exception for all dayers (permission gained - though don't tell them we have), I always worry that dropping the 'prescribed' will lead to every morning being a " can you give so and so this, can you put this on so and so" and I try not to give my parents an inch.....

Edited by Mouseketeer
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From my point of view....

 

We try to stick to prescribed only...or failing that from a pharmacist.

We do have occasions where we apply creams like aveeno or an alternative(so not a PMO)

all applications of any creams(other than suncream) are recorded in our medicines book. we sign them /have them witnessed and ask the parents to sign at the end. It really takes very little time and it ensures that everyone knows that we are doing the best for their children and ensuring they are comfortable. We have a little one who has palmer psoriasis at the moment and her hands can become very sore...if we didn't treat it she may end up not being able to come to pre-school which would be exclusive IMO.

We tend not to use nappy cream as our children are on the verge of toilet training ! if we do (because we don't have many !!) we also record ....but that's because it's rare for us! (and may also be a sign of neglect in our cases so therefore worth recording!!!)

 

Suncream is given permission for separately .

 

We never give creams for bites and stings...never really make a difference I feel and may cause distress putting them on....I would rather see how the wound develops and keep an eye on it.

 

Wildflower...do you ever have any issues with tics...and if so do you send home immediately or????

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Wildflower...do you ever have any issues with tics...and if so do you send home immediately or????

According to the risk assessment we would cover a tick with a plaster and inform the parent. Thanks to you Finleysmaid I've realised that it is not clear about when this informing would take place. I had at the end of the session in mind when writing the policy, but have become increasingly concerned about ticks so would phone the parent and ask them if they would prefer to come and pull it out or wait until the end of our day. Will update!

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We never give creams for bites and stings...never really make a difference I feel and may cause distress putting them on....I would rather see how the wound develops and keep an eye on it.

We use antihistamine cream or ammonia liquid for severe nettle stings. I wouldn't leave a nettle rash or bee sting with really upsets a child without a product that can relieve the pain to see how it develops, provided that we have been given parents' written consent to apply it.

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I think to strive for the answer what is the difference between or when does something become a medicine or is medicinal is quite a grey area and I am not sure it is one that can be given a definitive answer. You are happy applying creams, and it sounds like a necessity given your location, as long as you have done your research into possible side effects, parents are fully aware of the types of creams you have at your disposal, as a parent I would be happy and as long as you can explain to Ofsted your procedures I am sure they would be happy enough I can't even remember a time when Ofsted asked me anything along these lines, nor even checked the medical records we keep.

 

Catching parents is a tricky business as we all know - our children are collected from the hall, one by one, so unless I have a really senior moment and forget, books get signed etc. or key persons tell parents oh so and so had a little bump today but was fine.

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We used to inform on when we applied anything to the child.. and record it, and get parent to sign..

 

we had inspectors that always check these records and got asked lots of questions about it.. once a staff member did not sign full name and we got it mentioned as a negative.. it was all she could find wrong!

 

As to parents and catching them, suppose it depends on how often it happened but if we found problems we used to send text message to parents asking them to speak to staff member on collection - other way was to put a sticker on the child which asked parent to speak to staff before leaving.. that usually worked..

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Not come across this before....can't seem to find any reference to it anywhere....care to enlighten me???

After Bite, for children over 2 years:

31pvgQDGPoL._AC_UL160_SR160,160_.jpg

Safety data: Safety Data After Bite.pdf

On the company's site I found an ammonia-free product containing baking soda, aloe vera and tea tree oil:

41SLMIaCNhL._AC_UL160_SR160,160_.jpg

Safety data: Safety Data After Bite Kids.pdf

Baking soda and aloe vera, alongside other things, are recommended here for nettles: Treating nettle sting.html

Thanks to all of you who engaged in this topic!

What I will do is to, when asking for parents' written permission to apply something with an active ingredient onto a child, provided by them or us, is to ask if they wish to be informed about us having applied it at the end of the session. If they say yes, then it obviously matters to them, so will ask for their signature. However, for any medicated creams prescribed by a doctor (i.e. on prescription, e.g. with antibiotics) I will inform the parent each time and ask them to sign.

Edited by Wildflowers
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[...] In the interests of research Wildflowers, will you be getting yourself stung to find out if the treatment works?

Pulling nettles is what I do when frustrated with Ofsted's ambiguous guidance (it's very satisfying when you get long roots), so I sting myself a lot!

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