Jump to content
Home
Forum
Join Us
Articles
About Us
Tapestry

Rectangles


Recommended Posts

I just give them both names I.e, some people also call them oblongs, I think oblong is the better word, that's what I was taught at school many, many years ago and it's so helpful for the children to be able to distinguish properly between like sounding triangle/rectangle

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We had a discussion about this at work the other day, I shall be following this tread with interest!

It was me who said about rectangles being squares, and every poo-pooed me............. so I did what I seem to do a lot lately and though 'blow it, why worry' and went back to what I was doing - I think maybe I need a change of job now :(:( as I seem to be losing the will to fight anymore :mellow:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It should be oblong, but as others have said, it went sort of out of fashion, despite being mathematically correct. Rectangle is a more generic term, like flower or bird, and includes both squares and oblongs. So, if a child calls that shape a rectangle, it isn't wrong, but I would go further and say its a special rectangle, called an oblong. (drawing attention to the 'long' in oblong) If you liken it to the flower, a child says that's a flower, you might go on and tell them its a rose or a daffodil. So calling it a flower isnt wrong.

The problem comes when a child calls a square a rectangle and we correct them. But a square is a rectangle, again its a special type of rectangle. That would equate to telling the child that the daffodil isnt a flower.

I am passionate about teaching correct mathematical vocabulary because if we don't it causes so many problems and misconceptions in maths later on. If you've ever tried to teach year 4 that a square is indeed a type of rectangle, its no wonder children get confused after years of being told no it isnt.

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have always used rectangle as the general term for squares and oblongs, 'this rectangle us called a square'. This teaches children that there are clusters of shapes in the same way that triangles can all look very different, but they are still triangles. I don't use ovoid for egg shapes and ovals though ~ Perhaps I should!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We had a discussion about this at work the other day, I shall be following this tread with interest!

It was me who said about rectangles being squares, and every poo-pooed me............. so I did what I seem to do a lot lately and though 'blow it, why worry' and went back to what I was doing - I think maybe I need a change of job now :(:( as I seem to be losing the will to fight anymore :mellow:

A rectangle is a quadrilateral with four right angles so you are absolutely correct. You can go back and tell the staff that ;-)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

and to be even more pedantic all you need to do is to say that the 'face' of this shape is a rectangle, or whatever it is, and of course the sides of the shape will be a rectangles as well as well ;-) I can only think of a sphere and a triangular pyramid which don't have any rectangular sides, but I expect there are others.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Having only discovered a few years ago that oblongs were a subset of rectangles I try to remember to use the term with my children but it's a hard habit to break (having just remembered the shape work I did with my year ones where I didn't mention it once. :( ) I sometimes worry about my subject knowledge - how do I know I don't know something or that I know it incorrectly?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Jacquie for making me aware that an oblong can be a rectangle or an ellipse. An oblong is an elongated square or circle.

Children naming shapes can't be told that they are incorrect when they call the square a rectangle. Any suggestion how to keep it simple and correct?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The difference between an oblong and a rectangle is that an oblong is a rectangle whose sides are of different lengths. A rectangle on the other hand is a four sided polygon that has four right angle corners.

 

You of course wild flowers must tell you children whatever you feel comfortable with using

Edited by Suer
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I also don't tell a child that they are wrong, but have up to now said, when a child has called a square a rectangle, e.g. "hmm... a rectangle has two long sides and two short..." encouraging them to think further. This discussion has helped me become aware of my ignorance ~ thanks!

We have now decided not to bring oblongs in the mix and instead say, "yes it is a kind of a rectangle called square because..."

Edited by Wildflowers
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. (Privacy Policy)