Jump to content
Home
Forum
Join Us
Articles
About Us
Tapestry

Sun Protection Versus Ricketts


Deb
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi everyone

 

Our procedure for application of suncreen is as follows

 

Parents apply a suitable high factor sun screen to their child before bringing them (morning or afternoon).

 

Staff apply sunscreen to children in the afternoon when they stay all day. We also apply in the morning to children attending early from breakfast club. All parents sign a form to give permssion to apply and agree to the above.

 

Had a parent today say that she hadn't applied sunscreen this morning as she didn't agree with it because of the children need some exposure to sun to avoid the risk of rickets but that we could apply sunscreen this afternoon if we want. She wasn't being difficult.

Thinking on this, I feel that I want to clarify our position on this. I feel that it is fine for a parent to make the decision as to when the child should have sunscreen applied when they are with them because they can judge for themselves dependant upon the conditions, and they only have a few children to look after. In a setting it is much more difficult to keep tabs on how much exposure to sun an individual child has had, because with 20 chidren say, they could be in and out during the session and the same member of staff may not be outside all the time. Therefore we need to have a blanket application of sunscreen/wearing sunhats etc.

 

What do others feel?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

http://www.bupa.co.uk/individuals/health-information/directory/r/rickets#textBlock259651

 

Sounds like a knee jerk reaction to recent press articles. Children will get vitamin D from other sources too, not just sunshine.

 

Prevention of rickets

 

There are several things you can do to help prevent your child from getting rickets.

Diet

 

Make sure your child eats plenty of foods that are rich in calcium and vitamin D. Good sources of calcium include:

  • dairy products (for example, milk, yoghurt and cheese)
  • bread made with fortified flour
  • soya beans and tofu
  • leafy green vegetables (for example, broccoli and cabbage but not spinach)

Diet alone isn't usually enough to give your child his or her daily requirement of vitamin D. However, you can get some vitamin D from:

  • oily fish (for example, sardines and mackerel)
  • eggs (cooked, not raw)
  • margarine
  • breakfast cereals fortified with vitamin D

Sun

 

Vitamin D is produced naturally by your body when your skin is exposed to sunlight, so your child may get enough vitamin D during summer by spending some time in the sun. However, a child’s skin can be easily damaged by the sun, so it’s very important not to let your child’s skin burn. For most children, spending frequent short spells in the sun without wearing sunscreen (typically a few minutes in the middle of the day) will be enough for them to get the vitamin D they need. However, for longer periods, you will need to protect your child’s skin from burning. This means keeping them in the shade, covering them up and applying sunscreen to their skin when exposed.

You need to be more careful with babies and toddlers, as they have very sensitive skin and can burn easily. Always keep babies and toddlers in the shade, or cover them up.

Supplements

 

The Department of Health recommends that all children aged six months to five years should take supplements containing seven micrograms of vitamin D a day, unless they drink 500 ml (one pint) or more of formula milk a day. This is especially important for babies being breastfed or children in at risk groups (for example Asian, African–Caribbean and Middle Eastern). Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding should take 10 micrograms a day.

Some families may be eligible for free vitamin D supplements from the government-run Welfare Foods Scheme.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We had a similar situation last year and as Catma has said vitamin D can be obtained via supplements and a balanced diet. We have a policy that says parents must apply sun screen and children must have a sun hat - we have free flow play all day and our garden is a bit of a sun trap. Today has been fab with lots of sun and plenty of water play.

 

To counteract the "argument" we post the UV rating daily (available from the met office website) and give parents an info leaflet about skin cancer risks - we also have a skin colour chart so that parents can see what is recommended. This has helped parents make an informed decision. The last thing I want is a parent returning 20 years down the line saying that because sun screen wasn't applied their child (now an adult) has skin cancer and given the litigous nature of society today it is not beyond the realms of possiblility that the finger could be pointed our way.

 

These might help:

 

Applying Sunscreen UV Ratings.docx

 

Ten tips for protecting children in the sun plus uv and skin type charts.docx

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is really interesting as I am about to write a 'sun safety policy'. We currently expect (and tell) parents to apply cream before they bring them in but it's hard to get some to do it.

 

I will download the skin colour chart - this has been an issue last summer - a black south African family didn't want the child wearing sun cream on his face but didn't mind arms so much - mum didn't want him to feel different etc. My black deputy does use it (and told the mum this) but in the end it was up to her we felt. She is a nurse too which made things more tricky...

 

I am Indian and do wear sun cream too.

 

I can't open the chart on my phone but will look on the computer tomorrow - thanks for sharing that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I often think it is more

 

skin cancer v rickets, which one has the worst outcome?

 

you supplement for one but the other is or could be fatal.

 

We had a staff member who lost her brother to skin cancer who used to chat to parents refusing to use the suncreams.. funnily enough they all changed their minds.. But I know few setting will have such a close link with the need for sun protection..

 

We had an added advantage as we were located near a beach where they always applied creams..

 

maybe a bit of explaining about the other side of not using them ...

 

I used to have a black African friend who always wore sun creams , proudly showing her watch strap mark to show she too changed skin colour after exposure .

Edited by Inge
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks very much everyone for all the informed comments and accompanying information. I now feel better armed to back up our policy. As Catma suggests this is probably just a knee jerk reaction from the parent rather than her being difficult. Its great as always to be shown where to find appropriate information which has saved me a lot of time.

 

Thanks again.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi all

 

interesting I had a conversation about this today as my parent said she couldn't put on sun screen as whatever was used brings her child's eczema out. This is not a child that is easily kept in the shade. I did wonder if the doctor could provide one that would be suitable under the circumstances but she didn't seem to keen to take her.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The school rule in Australia is, 'No Hat, No Play!'. That's wide brimmed or Legionare (sp?) style - none of this baseball cap business. I think there's a lot to be said for covering up. Was sent a child today with fab had and glasses but arms, shoulders and half her back uncovered!

 

Honey

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've seen some fab posters outside school pushing 'Hat, splat and wrap' . Hat is obvious, splat is suncream and wrap is loose comfortable clothes. Nice and memorable. :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interesting.............................today I had a parent berate me because I had a basket of sunscreen available for parents who had forgotten to slap some on their children. They ranged from factor 30 to 50............she told me off about the factor 50, because ' that's a sun BLOCK, not a cream and children NEED to have some sunshine on their skin so they get vitamin D, otherwise they get ill from vitamin deficiencies'. I did point out that children get Vitamin D from lots of other sources and he needed to be protected from the sun.............but no, she wasn't having it. Child played in the shade all morning...........

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi all

 

interesting I had a conversation about this today as my parent said she couldn't put on sun screen as whatever was used brings her child's eczema out. This is not a child that is easily kept in the shade. I did wonder if the doctor could provide one that would be suitable under the circumstances but she didn't seem to keen to take her.

 

Assume her child will be wearing long sleeved t-shirts and long trousers then!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interesting.............................today I had a parent berate me because I had a basket of sunscreen available for parents who had forgotten to slap some on their children. They ranged from factor 30 to 50............she told me off about the factor 50, because ' that's a sun BLOCK, not a cream and children NEED to have some sunshine on their skin so they get vitamin D, otherwise they get ill from vitamin deficiencies'. I did point out that children get Vitamin D from lots of other sources and he needed to be protected from the sun.............but no, she wasn't having it. Child played in the shade all morning...........

 

Thank goodness for this forum for keeping us sane :bananas: :blink: :bananas:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interesting.............................today I had a parent berate me because I had a basket of sunscreen available for parents who had forgotten to slap some on their children. They ranged from factor 30 to 50............she told me off about the factor 50, because ' that's a sun BLOCK, not a cream and children NEED to have some sunshine on their skin so they get vitamin D, otherwise they get ill from vitamin deficiencies'. I did point out that children get Vitamin D from lots of other sources and he needed to be protected from the sun.............but no, she wasn't having it. Child played in the shade all morning...........

 

I have sunscreen on offer for parents who have 'forgotten'........just one bottle and it's factor 50 :blink: xD

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Assume her child will be wearing long sleeved t-shirts and long trousers then!

 

Yes but only after we put them on her and then you have to make sure she has plenty of fluids as she is really hot!! there must be something she can use. Today no different where we are there weather is scorching and still children with no sunscreen and parents looking rather blank! lots of reminders going out but really....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When we have children with sun screen allergies we suggest that they use P20 (my daughter has v. sensitive skin and this doesn't set her off) - some of my parents have tried this and it works for their children. Biggest drawback is the price but it is meant to be a waterproof once a day application so can be a money saver if used properly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I find it quite extraordinary that parents send their children out into the sun without adequate cream/covering.

We are standing at our entrance doors asking everyone coming in "do they have cream on" I find it quite amazing the amount that haven't. We have one bottle of cream (factor 30+) and if parents dont like it on their child then they have to go and get their own.

Ours wear a uniform, which is great as since doing so it has stopped the concern (particularly with the girls) of strappy dresses and bare shoulders, we always have a few spare 2nd hand to "lend" as well. We also invested in a load of legionaries hats couple of years ago, that we keep on a trolley outside and the children know to put them on as they step outside. However I think if we had someone bring a child in uncovered, with no cream & refusing to put it on I may well be inclined to send them home. We do not want to keep them inside but we also have a duty of care to the children- we wouldn't send them outside in freezing weather with out appropriate clothing.A friend of mine is a TA in a primary school- winter before last (when we had such freezing cold) she said her HT was so fed up of children coming in with no coats and unabke to go outside at lunchtime esp that they told her to ring around every parent of children that had come in without coats and tell them that they would not be allowed in the gates the next day without one. As I said I cannot see the difference between the two.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love that! Wish I had the guts to do it!

 

Quick edit to add that when I asked a parent if her child had cream on, she said, 'what! At 8.30 in the morning! I've enough on just getting two children dressed and out of the house! ' sigh

Edited by Cait
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Asked a parent (of the only child still with no hat in box) if she'd remembered the hat one morning last week to be told "oh no but I do have her sunglasses will that do" the speech bubble in my head reply was " sure they,ll stop her getting ******* sunstroke won't they"!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. (Privacy Policy)