Jump to content
Home
Forum
Join Us
Articles
About Us
Tapestry

Not Allowed Outside


 Share

Recommended Posts

Today (whilst I was out on a course) a child was dropped off at nursery by a relative other than the parent with a message from the parent to say that they didn't want their child to be allowed outside during the session, with little explantation as to why. The child was very upset when he was not allowed outside and subsequently his behaviour deteriorated.

This is the first time that we have had to deal with this request. I wondered how others have dealt with this in their settings. The head has suggested that the parent will need to put this request in writing. My concern is that the child is not being offered the whole curriculum according to the EYFS. And that the majority of the children spend most of their time outisde at the moment and so it was little wonder the child was upset today as he was playing inside almost on his own.

What would you do?

Elfy

x

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hmm, yes, you make a valid point. I think in this case it needs to be in writing. Plus - if the child isn't well enough to go outside, should he be there at all - although I appreciate that you haven't said that this was the reason.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think you put it really well Elfy - the child won't be offered the full curriculum and the child has shown you how he feels about the situation by his behaviour.

 

We've never had a request like this and without knowing exactly why the parent doesn't want her son to go outside, it is hard to know how to respond. I think your head is right in getting the parent to confirm in writing what they want you to do and why. Perhaps a chat about the benefits of outdoor play and how much this little chap is missing out on might help allay the parent's worries.

 

Good luck - let us know what happens won't you?

 

Maz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Partnership with parents and all that, I'd suggest parent comes in to see you for a chat before asking for written request, then you can explain that the EYFS is a statutory curriculum, in other words you must follow it and that within the EYFS curriculum the outside environment is integral to the learning environment. If after the chat the parent still states that she doesn't want her child to access the outdoors and you feel there is not a valid reason for excluding the child from the outdoors then say that the parent will need to put her request in writing and that you will need to send a copy to Ofsted, who are your regulatory body and also request a signed statement, to include with the letter, saying that you have explained to the parent the legal requirements of the EYFS.

 

Whilst explaining the legal requirements of the EYFS you could add what the benefits are, ask is there any way you could support the parent in enabling her child to access outdoors, maybe provide wellies or extra clothing (from lost property :o ) etc, etc.

 

Maybe give an analogy, for example a parent couldn't request that a child miss maths at school, explain that the EYFS is a compulsory curriculum just like the national curriculum taught in schools.

 

Peggy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We had the same request a while back, although to be honest I am not sure the child would have wanted to go out ever!! We asked parent to come in and join in the session, he really enjoyed it and spent most of his time outside!! He then realised the importance of the outdoor area and retracted his request, but the child still chose not to go out, unless it was really sunny and everyone else was outside when she would stand next to the door!! :oxD

Link to comment
Share on other sites

but the child still chose not to go out, unless it was really sunny and everyone else was outside when she would stand next to the door!! :oxD

It could be the child had already absorbed the attitude of her father and decided that outdoors wasn't a good place to be - hopefully she'll catch other children's enthusiasm!

 

Maz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We did have a request and we explained the importance of outside play and explained outside was part of our normal play.

Gave out leaflets etc

 

Our litle boy loved outside,not sure he'd seen it much. The mum also asked for him not to play with water and his brother made a pair of binoculars so he could spy on him to stop him. :o:(

 

We actually declined on both aspects - as children have the right to decide what they play with and control their own learning. United nations convention of rights of child. Child is still with us and I still get lots of grunts and tuts from mum.

 

The little boy lives in the water and outside xD

 

How can you actually stop a child from going out, we can not hold them back!!! - would we stop a child from playing indoors.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thanks for all you responses. I will speak to the parents when I see them next and try to keep you informed of progress ( I hope we make progress!!!). This parent is very protective and things are already quite strained. The parent required three separate meetings recently over the fact that her child had hurt himself at nursery . This was a incident where the child was playing happily with another and they ran into each other. The parent feels the child should come to no harm ever!?!?!?!?! This parent makes me feel very vulnerable as I feel they have unrealistic expectations.Elfy

x

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We had a parent request that her child not be allowed outside one day because dad had a cold and the child might be going to catch it!! :o

 

He is also always sent in summer canvas shoes even though we have notices everywhere saying we play out whatever the weather and please send your child in suitable clothes and footwear!! I am going shopping tomorrow to buy spare wellys so he can play outside in the wet or snow as he loves it outside.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I bought some thick anoraks as we have a couple of children who turn up in thin coats - even in this weather! Wellies, as you say because we have some who get dropped off by car in strappy shoes. We also have a notice up about appropriate clothing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

not an only child, there is one younger and this child does always come appropraitely dressed for the cold with coat, scarf, gloves, hat, wellies etc. and at nursery the child can access waterproof trousers. I think we have a case of a very very protective parent who has a lack of awareness of what nursery is all about. How can one parent make you feel so on edge and vulnerable? arghhhhhhhh!!!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Maybe give an analogy, for example a parent couldn't request that a child miss maths at school, explain that the EYFS is a compulsory curriculum just like the national curriculum taught in schools.

 

 

Quite true, but schools frequently have (must admit to doing it myself a couple of times over the years) parents requesting child doesn't d P.E.

We used to have a couple of parents request their children (we have no outside play) not play with the water as they had, had 'fevers' and for one of them could she not drink the milk unless it was warmed first as cold milk gave her a cold.

I could think of 2/3 of my current parents tthat if we did have a regular outdoor play space then we would also be having regular discussions on the benefits o outdoor play :o

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hmm, I know that feeling. They make it so hard - only child?

Isn't that sterotyping? In my experience the parents of single children are no more likely to be over-protective than any others.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi and welcome to the forum jumpstart.

 

There can be loads of reasons for being over protective, but a child without sibblings can sometimes have parents who dont understand the rough and tumble involved when loads of children are together, no matter how well they are supervised. Some people have an inability to see that anyone could possibly be as good at giving care as they can.

 

I still remember the physical pull I felt the first time I left my son in the care of his nan while I whizzed to the shops. I could barely make it through the front gate.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Isn't that sterotyping? In my experience the parents of single children are no more likely to be over-protective than any others.

Good point, jumpstart - we all need a reminder of that from time to time. :o

 

Welcome to the Forum - congratulations on making your first post.

 

Now that's out of the way, keep them coming!

 

Maz

Edited by HappyMaz
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Isn't that sterotyping? In my experience the parents of single children are no more likely to be over-protective than any others.

 

 

Congratulations on your first post, and welcome to the forum

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:o

One of my parents said that they had to keep their child off school because it had caught a chill while playing in the puddles outside the day before. Child was appropriately dressed and was changed as soon as they came in. Has anybody got any information i could give the parent to say that you don't catch a chill from playing outside.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:o

One of my parents said that they had to keep their child off school because it had caught a chill while playing in the puddles outside the day before. Child was appropriately dressed and was changed as soon as they came in. Has anybody got any information i could give the parent to say that you don't catch a chill from playing outside.

Welcome to the Forum Hanning!

 

Congratulations on making your first post - hope you make yourself at home. This is a potential bugbear for parents isn't it - and I'm sure there is research somewhere showing that children don't get a chill from playing outside. I'm sure Helen Bilton mentioned it on our last training day with her at uni. I'll have a look at see if I have anything suitable!

 

Maz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's documented evidence that colds are caused by a virus, not by being cold! However, there are some theories that the virus can be triggered by the inside of the nose being very cold, so.......

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. (Privacy Policy)