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It looks like it was because of personal phone usage as well as other things ....but it makes me laugh that the people protesting the loudest about how stupid it was (yes it was) and banging on about safeguarding and also staff that shouldn't be able to work on systems such as tapestry at home are the same people that one click on their name often tells you where they work, or they 'like' or 'follow' the setting they work and another click and we can all help ourselves to any number of photos of the children in their settings :-/

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There are always two parts to every story but...

  • there should have been a mobile ohone policy in action....ofsted are very hot about this at the moment and it is in the new framework.
  • There were other issues brought up in this inspection including issues in the garden
  • Who's phone were they using and how was this monitored?

The attitude and disposition of the Manager to a problem is assessed by ofsted ...it would appear that the question about a serious case review should have raised more concerns.

 

I haven't read the report but i'm sure there will be more to this than fist meets the eye

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Two questions I have about this

 

How did Ofsted find out about it? Was it during an inspection?

and

Were they really going to stay Outstanding if they had an inadequate judgement for the use of their outside space?

 

The article does make them sound like they have a rather casual attitude to mobiles which is obviously not acceptable these day.

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Totally agree with the idea of reassuring a worried parent with a photo. But as soon as it mentioned that it was taken on a mobile phone, it made me go ahh. We are all aware of the policy surrounding mobile phones and there really is no excuse for this. Why was this not done on the settings camera and emailed to the parent. Obviously this was only done with the best intentions to all concerned but policy is there for a reason, and its our job not only to protect the children, but staff members and the businesses reputation.

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from their report FYI

 

 

 

Children are not safeguarded effectively. Staff use personal mobile phones to photograph children at the setting, such as for observations and sending messages to parents. The provider/manager lacks understanding of the risks this presents to children and does not monitor the use of mobile phones effectively to ensure children's safety.

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from their report FYI

 

 

 

 

Children are not safeguarded effectively. Staff use personal mobile phones to photograph children at the setting, such as for observations and sending messages to parents. The provider/manager lacks understanding of the risks this presents to children and does not monitor the use of mobile phones effectively to ensure children's safety.

Totally deserve all they got then!!

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I guess the real issue here is IT security. It does seem a bit "shut the stable door after the horse has bolted" to have a blanket ban on mobiles, and yet all settings take photos and are we sure how secure our systems are in handling them? I notice someone suggested it may be safer to take a photo with a camera and then email to the parent...in my eyes this presents exactly the same risks as using a phone...

 

I suspect that the managers response to the questions of the inspector were the nail in the coffin here, ie not recognising the risks of the Vanessa George case. i suspect there was no camera/phone/ICT policy in place,

 

I notice the inspector makes a comment on how the manager fails to monitor the use of phones.

 

Whether I agree with the blanket ban on mobiles or not, I have to say that anyone using one during an inspection, probably will get what they deserve.

Edited by eyfs1966
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I guess the real issue here is IT security. It does seem a bit "shut the stable door after the horse has bolted" to have a blanket ban on mobiles, and yet all settings take photos and are we sure how secure our systems are in handling them? I notice someone suggested it may be safer to take a photo with a camera and then email to the parent...in my eyes this presents exactly the same risks as using a phone...

 

I suspect that the managers response to the questions of the inspector were the nail in the coffin here, ie not recognising the risks of the Vanessa George case. i suspect there was no camera/phone/ICT policy in place,

 

I notice the inspector makes a comment on how the manager fails to monitor the use of phones.

 

Whether I agree with the blanket ban on mobiles or not, I have to say that anyone using one during an inspection, probably will get what they deserve.

 

Why on earth would it not be OK to take a photo with the settings camera?

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Can I also add, that I have for many many years had a "no mobiles" policy, and have expressly noted in our disciplinary terms that use of mobile phones for taking photos during working hours is a gross misconduct offence.

 

I still however have a nagging doubt that Ofsted are slightly missing the point thinking that's good enough....

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Who is monitoring what photos are emailed out? Who has access to the camera and the computer? What safeguards are in place? I'm not saying it's wrong, I am just saying it's still not safe without other safeguards in place, that's all.

 

At the end of the day, this is a problem area...it's not just mobile phones....

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I think it's irrelevant whether Ofsted are there or not. The policy should be in force at all times. We often text a parent to say their child is fine, but no uploading of photos takes place.

I do think their good intentions were there, but were totally misguided in what is appropriate.:(:(:(

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I think fredbear sums it up well, good intentions but poor judgement. I'm sure that the very parents who are supporting their nursery equally would be the first to complain if there was an issue with safeguarding. For the setting, safeguarding sadly has to be as much about safeguarding the staff as it is a case of safeguarding the child. Here no one was safeguarded.

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Fredbear do you text on personal mobiles or a setting mobile?

 

 

Anyone that works in a setting knows that you don't have your mobiles with you in the playroom.

But I know childminders that use their mobiles while they are working. Are ofsted going to shut all childminders down.

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We only have a mobile in setting as we don't have a landline. It deliberately doesn't have a camera. It is kept stuck on the wall with velcro where everyone (except children) can grab it in an emergency. All staff phones in their lockers.

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When I first read about it I felt sorry for the nursery. After reading the Ofsted report I had a totally different feeling. Staff using their personal mobile phones to take pictures of children. Are these phones being taken into toilets? No matter if you trust your staff you can never be sure there is no wrong doing. There are unfortunately sick people that manage to work in childcare that will abuse this and this is why we have Policies that can help prevent this.

There have been enough cases brought to light around mobile phones in settings that surely managers/owners should have a no mobile phone policy!

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