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Ever feel like we (PVIs) are fighting a losing battle?


Jeany
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What ???? I watched this on the TV this morning and must admit to screaming at the television. :angry: The next thing they will be suggesting is that all parents must have a degree before giving birth? Now there's a thought! As a manager of a PVI setting with a committee in name only, I also feel that our days are numbered. I have a foundation degree but am paid less than a cleaner or gardener. I am not prepared to carry out anymore higher education. The impact on my family and home life was enormous and I am not prepared to put them or me through that again. The scope of what we are now expected to do to support our families is increasing daily but without the recognition of what we actually do. It all seems very negative at the moment. :( PS. Sorry for the rant.

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I only skimmed through it but what on earth happened to every PVI setting having a graduate leader by 2015? Because of this directive I began a foundation degree, followed by topping up to BA (Hons) then EYP. The year after I was awarded EYP the standards were changed, then cut. Next they changed the name to EYT but said we couldn't transfer to that. Now, within a few short years, someone has probably been paid huge amounts of money to create another report that says PVI settings need a graduate leader...I'm getting a feeling of deja vu and it makes me SO CROSS!

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so if they are in school it's ok to have apprentices looking after them but if they are in a nursery then we need to have a degree....doesn't quite add up does it! and which twit would suggest that two year olds do not need high levels of care but in the other article we are being told that we need to increase their levels of speech (so we ignore and speak to them at the same time??????)

Unless the government fund us (like nurses) to get a free degree then it ain't going to happen. I refuse to do a degree to get paid the same pittance as i do now (to be fair my setting pays me what they can...but i am earning just over the amount i was earning 30 years ago!)

Humm

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I'm PVI and have EY degree and have EYP but the goal posts keep changing. I won't be eligible to get Teacher status as I do not have GSCE Science, having taken time out of my family's life to get degree and EYP I am not going to stunt their development to get a GCSE in a subject that I feel confident to look up on the internet if I have a question about it.

I visit other settings to see children I share care with and see other PVI's all doing fantastic jobs.

I do wish this would stop trying put these ridiculous, stereotypical descriptors that are becoming discrimantory and divisive!

Let's concentrate on improving settings that are not doing so well, it really makes no difference whether its a PVI or maintained or anything else. It's the little people that use them that matters.

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I find both these articles to be contradicting each other. AS for the 'advice on prioritising cost over quality' one - well really- what twit has come up with all that!!

Really, I feel that we are all just banging our heads against the wall.

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I am all for the graduate leader and the change in GCSE rules it helps boost the reputation of childcare and makes people realise is not just a last ditch job because you failed every thing else( and yes I know that's not every one with out GCSEs) BUT the government need to fund these changes and understand how they impact on EY settings.

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perhaps when the new government gets in (or the old one returns :blink: ) we should write a letter between us and all send one to our new MP's,,,,,i would like to think that the NDNA and the PSLA would stand up for us but im beginning to wonder where their loyalties lie? :ph34r:

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But we put up with it and I think this has to change. I know we all do it for the children, but when you read the threads on here, the majority of us are feeling overwhelmed. Yes, there will be the superhero's, but for the majority, I think I am safe to say, we are all feeling the expectations are too much.

 

I too spent 4 1/2 years working towards the changes. I did a 3 year foundation degree and then spent another year and a half doing my degree at a HUGE cost to my family. And for what? Yes, I am proud I have a degree in my chosen field, but has it earned me more status, job progression or increased wages? Has it hell. Wages pitiful. And more and more of my free time spent on work just to keep abreast if I can. All my qualifications have afforded me is being told I need more qualifications to do the job I already do so well. On top of this, the government/LEA's have the ordacity to think it is acceptable to give me extra work now of those they are making redundant. More fools us for continuing to accept the never ending changes and increase in the workload!

 

I worry for the early years workforce.

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I hate to read all these sad comments but what you are all saying is so true, like everyone else I did my EYP because it was going to be a requirement, I thoroughly enjoyed my journey and met some amazing people but for what? I today paid a lady to clean my house more per hour than I earn as the Manager of a setting. I don't begrudge the cleaner a penny but there is something wrong with the equation - I employ a cleaner because I am working in excess of 48 hrs a week and she earns more per hour?

When will our work be financially recognised?

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I don't think it ever will. 17 years ago I gave up cleaning. I had been a secretary, mum (my best career choice!), child minder and then cleaner. Because cleaning was so unrewarding I took a big pay drop so that I could do my DPP and provide other people's children with the love and learning mine had had at our village playgroup. Even now, as I work in an affluent area, me and my qualified staff get paid less than the cleaners and I often say "What is more important? Who looks after your child or your house?". Not to parents, obviously, or I'd be out of a job!

Since our pre-school could never possibly pay a teacher's wage, especially if we stuck to our sensible early years ratios, there was no incentive for me to go down that route. I admire teachers immensely and was proud when my son started his PGCE last year but I believe so few people have the appreciation and respect for teachers any more that I could not go down that route, even if I were young enough to do that now.

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Yep lets give up now.........looks like some people dont know what they are taking about.....in a school nursery I know who take 2 year olds the teacher isnt with the class but 'on the premises'.....dont know what parents think but if I had a two year old I would want them with people who cared for them and taught them to have fun as PLA motto used to say 'Learn through play' .

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I hate to read all these sad comments but what you are all saying is so true, like everyone else I did my EYP because it was going to be a requirement, I thoroughly enjoyed my journey and met some amazing people but for what? I today paid a lady to clean my house more per hour than I earn as the Manager of a setting. I don't begrudge the cleaner a penny but there is something wrong with the equation - I employ a cleaner because I am working in excess of 48 hrs a week and she earns more per hour?

When will our work be financially recognised?

The government expect us to run to sa,e standards as a school but the grants we recieve are not inline with us having to pay a 'living wage' so no it wont be recognised.

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I have worked in childcare for twenty odd years and own and run my own provision. I don't mind saying that at 57 years old, I am becoming totally disillusioned with a job I once loved. We are expected to do so so much these days for very little return. My weekends are taken up with paperwork and I never really switch off as there is always some changes to cope with. The government don't have a clue and make me so angry grrrrrr! :angry:

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I have worked in childcare for twenty odd years and own and run my own provision. I don't mind saying that at 57 years old, I am becoming totally disillusioned with a job I once loved. We are expected to do so so much these days for very little return. My weekends are taken up with paperwork and I never really switch off as there is always some changes to cope with. The government don't have a clue and make me so angry grrrrrr! :angry:

How true Montycat, I think that there are many in a similar position to you, love the children that part never changes, but the continual interference from Government gets on one's pip!

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How true Montycat, I think that there are many in a similar position to you, love the children that part never changes, but the continual interference from Government gets on one's pip!

If any of it was grounded in actual research from actual childcare professionals it would be bearable - May 7th draws nearer so we can probably expect the baby thrown out with the bath water yet again in the next year or two.

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