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Sand/glitter in the eyes


Guest Spiral
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Hi there,

 

we have the usual problem with sand going into children's eyes. This has always been a problem as we have a large sandpit. We do have a section within the policy booklet that states we will ask the parents to consider taking the child to their gp as a precaution.

 

However... in the exact instance when a child has sand in their eyes and is desperately trying to rub them are we able to use a pipette to wash out the eyes with? Obviously sterile pipette and fluid designed for the eyes!

 

Much as I have done first aid for a number of years, I still haven't had a straight answer.

 

Thank you,

 

Spiral

 

 

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We always use wet towels and hold them on the eye, I wouldnt like to use a pipette, what if you were jolted or the child moved suddenly? Saying tha I've never cme across anything other than water and a towel.

When my son played rugby, the requirement to have a first aider on hand was removed, we were told if you've got water and a phone thats all you need. Probably different in EY to be honest, but I always thought it was good sense.

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My son is 16 and only the other day he was telling me how traumatised he was (and still is, a bit!) by his experiences at the hands of one of the ladies at pre-school who was always responsible for washing the sand out of children's eyes with a bottle of water and a paper towel. We had a small sealed bottle of evian or whatever in the 'fridge specially for the purpose and she used to recline children's heads back against her bosom, and irrigate the eye, wiping the water (and hopefully the sand) away with the towel. Then the bottle was thrown away and a new one put into the 'fridge ready for the next child.

Like Rea I wouldn't like to use a pipette (couldn't guarantee a steady hand with a wriggling child anyway) but the bottle seemed to work. Although not if you talk to my son, obviously! :o

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I'd obviously never hold a child down and force them. However, this child asked us to wash it out and I can't see that a paper towel is such a good means of doing this.

 

The sand is kept outside and is not clean. I did speak to a paediatrician who stated he would always advise that the child is referred to a&e as sand can cause extreme injuries even weeks after entering the eye.

 

Sorry, didn't mean to open a can of worms

Spiral

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I'd obviously never hold a child down and force them.

Gosh Spiral! I wouldn't think for a moment you would! :o Although when I think of my little wriggler, I suspect he probably was! :(

I wonder if anyone has been on any recent first aid training and can shed a light on current practice?

I shall watch this one with interest.

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not sure of current requirements if there are any, but we used to very lightly and gently brush off any sand from around the eyes and then use running tap water and a cup over a sink to wash sand off faces and in eyes..turning head so that it did not run over the face, lots of it..

Rubbing the eyes or holding a cloth to it can cause corneal abrasions.

 

of course a good cry would cause tears to remove the sand! so we never tried to stop them crying if that was what they were doing, but comfort and be there ..

 

then ask parents to take them to gp particularly if they complained of pain or itching in eyes as there could be an abrasion that needs treatment.. most heal themselves but can become infected..

we never used glitter on anything that would be worn by the child.. to help remove the chance of glitter in eyes, particularly hats or masks.. my staff continually tried to use glitter on hats and crowns only for me to remove it and stop the children wearing them!

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All our staff have attended 1st aid training and we were all told the same thing. Never use a cloth or anything to wipe the eye and only irrigate it using water - they said straight from the tap in a beaker or something similar - they didn't say it had to be sterilised so long as it was "fresh" water. Not sure I would use water from the fridge to be honest as cold water going straight in the eye might make it even more uncomfortable? That might just be me though lol!

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I wouldn't suggest using the towel to wipe the eye - just that it was useful for 'catching' the water and anything else that came out during irrigation. Trying to prevent the children from rubbing their eyes as a very natural reaction is a whole other problem!

Mind you, as I said. This was about 13 years ago! Still traumatic after all these years! ;)

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ok having just done ifrst aid (again!!!!) we have eye wash (which comes in sterile tubes) It is designed to have the top broken off and then you squeeze it drop by drop in to the eye ...catch the drips as they come out. It is basically the same as artificial tears....if a child is crying great...it will wash the sand out! :o They are rarely used...but is a fab product. PLEASE do not wipe the eye with any sort of towel the grains of sand will be pulled across the cornea and scratch it (used to have a boyfriend who did sand racing...his mother once told me off!) Never traumatised a child yet doing it! ^_^

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I think I was having a bad day...after all the reason the sand and glitter goes into the eyes is that another child throws it (that is when they aren't hitting, kicking, pinching or biting).

Sand in the eyes has always been contentious issue and treating it has been difficult.

Thank you for your responses,

 

Spiral:-)

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