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children writing their names


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Hi all

 

Could you please let me know how you encourage/teach children to write their names?

 

Do you ever use dots or tracing paper?

 

Thank you

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I think the common consensus is to provide the materials they need for making marks and an environment rich is words and letters but not to actually teach the name writing unless their show an interest in it.

Lots of pre writing materials too, jigsaws, threading, dough etc. plus opportunities to build large muscles, climbing frames, big drawing/painting, ball games.

I have seen dots on tracing paper but unless the child shows a absolute interest in the task they often have no idea what they're doing. I used to give people Japanese/Chinese/Arabic writing and ask them to trace it. Do they understand what they're tracing? Did they know where to start or finish?

 

:1b

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I am no lover of dots or tracing paper, if all is as Rea says, and they are showing an interest, some of ours do, we use yellow felt tip pen to write their name and they may write over the top of it until they are showing some competency, many of ours though just like to write it straight onto whatever it is they have, i.e. a painting, or a drawing etc. Much of the "teaching" of their name comes from home, and consequently, we do struggle with correct formation, but we do our best to put things right.

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Thank goodness, I thought I was going mad! I would never ever use dots, tracing paper, butterfly writing call it what you will. New Manager thinks that this is how children learn to write their name, I know my training needs to be updated but I knew that this was missing out so many stages such as having muscle control in their fingers to hold a pencil/pen etc etc but we have also found that if children are forced to trace their name and they can not do it, it puts them off even trying! A sguiggle on a piece of paper with the child saying "thats my name" is highly praised, we then use sand/squirty soap on tables for them to make marks with, in the sand pit, at mark making table with lots of different media, paint brushes, sticks, chalk etc to build on.

 

Thank you both x

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Guest gabysagal

We have found that giving children a reason to write their name is a great incentive. we have name cards around on the writing table so they can use them to copy their name on to their paintings or other art work. we use magnetic letters so they can spell out their names. we also have a box in which they have sticky labels with their names and use these before they start writing their names. we have a display board for mark making and this encourages children too.

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we too have name cards on our multimedia trolley, we have used the yellow pen technique, we often use envelopes and blank post cards that the children can mark make on to represent making letters and notes to send home....some will ask for their card so they can copy their name, some like us to model it on a scrap of paper so they can watch us form the letters. I love it when they produce a whole a4 sheet of x's and say look! i wrote my name! ;)

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I always had name cards in many areas so they were available. The child had a picture which they chose and this was the same on their peg/name cards etc. We would remind children that they needed to put their name on work they did, and adults would gently encourage children to do this for themselves...your work, your name! Children had to find their name card when they came in with their parent to put it in the box to say they were in. In some reception classes they write their name to self register.

Children had access to tracing paper and would use their name cards to trace their names but this was just incidental and part of the general resourcing in the writing area.

Cx

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We do that too, Catma. I also have a set of name cards for the older children just showing their name without logo. If they wanta turn with something like the trampoline, or the laptop or whatever, then they go and find their name in the basket and put it beside what they want to do, then they can go off and do something else hilts they are waiting. The child using the equipment is then helped - if they need it, to work out whose turn it is next. Great impetus for locating your name!

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We also have those blue plastic letter shapes that a marble rolls around so children can observe correct letter formation.its finding a level tabletop or floor to do it on in our old chapel that's tricky! They are good though

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Activities which focus on large motor up and down (retracing verticals) and round and round (anti-clockwise) movements are developmentally essential too. I think too much focus is placed too soon on the fine motor holding pencils type activities when many children still need to inhibit a palmar reflex and develop their shoulder muscles and movements which then translate into using tools and implements effectively. Unless the child has got a tripod grip developed they will struggle. If children don't develop this they can end up with a cramped, difficult writing style, which can also inhibit their enjoyment of writing and get in the way of their learning later - through school they will need to develop a fluid handwriting style so they can write with speed when they get to KS1 and further.

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Activities which focus on large motor up and down (retracing verticals) and round and round (anti-clockwise) movements are developmentally essential too. I think too much focus is placed too soon on the fine motor holding pencils type activities when many children still need to inhibit a palmar reflex and develop their shoulder muscles and movements which then translate into using tools and implements effectively. Unless the child has got a tripod grip developed they will struggle. If children don't develop this they can end up with a cramped, difficult writing style, which can also inhibit their enjoyment of writing and get in the way of their learning later - through school they will need to develop a fluid handwriting style so they can write with speed when they get to KS1 and further.

 

Absolutely! :1b

 

Plus all of those other fine motor activities such as threading which develops ability to combine and/or isolate the movements of thumb, index and middle fingers......

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I having a Rant....

We had a mom ask just this morning how she could get her daughter to write her name. She starts school in September and mom's worried because she isn't showing an interest.

Where has this worry come from? Was it always like this? I didnt care one way or another if my lads could write their name, that was what they were going to school for! Teachers teach.

Does it really, honestly in the grand scheme of things, matter one little bit to anyone if a child can't write their name when they start school?

These children are 3 years old, 156 weeks.

I 'learnt' French for 6 years, 312 weeks, I cant speak it,

What's the rush all about?

 

Rant complete! :D

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Rea

 

Try my little well practised little speech - it starts like this.......

 

Think about building a wall - before you start to add bricks you need to build some firm foundations - that's what we are doing here laying the foundations - if you build your wall without proper foundations it will fall over after time - same thing applies to your child....... and so on and so on....... :1b

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Rea

 

Try my little well practised little speech - it starts like this.......

 

Think about building a wall - before you start to add bricks you need to build some firm foundations - that's what we are doing here laying the foundations - if you build your wall without proper foundations it will fall over after time - same thing applies to your child....... and so on and so on....... :1b

Rea, this is brilliant, consider it pinched. Very very true, so many parents want to rush their children through development stages without grasping the basics.

 

Thank you all

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so true - was only discussing this the other day at a LCM - about transition to school - when we came together to share our ideas - one lady said reading and writing - the teacher asked @ do you mean finding out what scheme the school does ? - 'no was the reply - we introduce this at age 3 as we have our own scheme- funnily the room went silent - :wub:

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