Jump to content
Home
Forum
Join Us
Articles
About Us
Tapestry

African Land Snails


fluffy
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi - we have 4 african land snails which we got during the spring term last year - they have been a great addition to our setting, provoking lots of questions, language & interest from our children. i was just wondering if anybody could advise me on what to expect through the winter months - do they hibernate? Ours seem to have become very inactive in the last couple of weeks - what experiences do other foorum members have of this - any advice would be greatly appreciated - our minibeasts topic is coming up agan soon - they need to survive as they are an integral part of thsi (also - if i am truthful i have become very attached to them-sad isn't it!!!) Thanks for any advice. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi.........you need to ask Kaz on the underfives forum.....................she keeps them and knows all sorts of interesting facts about them!However, a quick search on Google says they will hibernate if thet aren't kept warm enough,,so you need to buy a heat pad, which costs about £11 to keep them at the right temperature, so they don't go to sleep!It also tells you about keeping them moist by spraying them regularly............and the foodstuffs they like to eat.Hope that helps a bit??

Edited by narnia
Link to comment
Share on other sites

They do slow down when it becomes colder but don't hibernate if they are kept warm. If you move them to a warmer area they will perk up. A heat pad is a good idea. Remember to keep them moist ours love a nice shower under running water and cucumber is a firm favourite.

oh and they need cuttle fish to form their shells

 

http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en&i...nails&meta=

Edited by Marion
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest DeborahF

There's a company called Small Life Supplies - I think they've got a website - that supply all kinds of minibeasts including African Land Snails...whenever I've dealt with them they've been very helpful with all kinds of advice so maybe you could contact them?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi

 

Whilst on the subject of snails, can i just hijack a minute to ask about something - i was thinking about getting some African Land Snails for my setting. However, someone told me that have loads of babies and that getting rid of them becomes a problem. I certainly do not like the idea of 'disposing' of them.

 

Can anyone let me know if this is so.

 

Thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please bare in mind that the Giant African land Snail although legal in the UK, is considered a pest and is illegal in the USA and other countries. This has happened because of irresponsible ownership, releasing the eggs and young snails into gardens in which they have bred. Eggs and young snails are not to be introduced into the wild under any circumstances, so you must dispose of them. I believe the best way is to freeze the eggs?

 

 

Personally I couldn't do that so I would never keep them myself (I don't even kill the snails that decimate my seedlings in spring!!) but if you do decide to keep them, you have to taker the responsibility that goes with them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, Patricia, it's true. They can lay upwards of 200 eggs a time. This can be as regularly as monthly in summertime, much less likely when it's colder. There are companies [like Small Life Supplies - yes they do have a website] that will take the eggs if you post them, but even that can become a bit of a chore. Not all the eggs will be fertile but you can't tell which will hatch, and there are limits to how many baby snails you can give away!

 

On the plus side, they are very easy to look after, don't really smell if kept clean, and they're absolutely fascinating!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

As already mentioned, you would need to provide some sort of heat source (easiest option is a heat mat placed under the tank) as they are native to a tropical climate - where they wouldn't normally hibernate.

 

Snails are hermaphrodites, which means they have both male and female sex organs, but they do have to come together to mate. If you have more than one, they will all lay lots of eggs. The easiest and most humane way of disposing of them is the put them in the freezer for a few days, the sooner you find them the better. This will just stop the embryo developing.

 

I have a GAL, Sally, which I use for animal handling workshops. She is one of the most popular minibeasts and make great pets for young children.

Edited by Guest
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Giant African Landsnail?

 

 

silly me, (doh) I thought it was snails but as I couldn't see an 's' I thought it was some other exotic minibeast.

I really am not thinking straight today. :oxD

 

thanks.

 

Peggy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I took my son in for his nursery visit last week and their GALS are the offspring of the ones that were there when my eldest was in nursery seven years ago. I fully expect to have many battles with my boy about wanting to bring one home, he adores snails.

Karrie

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I took my son in for his nursery visit last week and their GALS are the offspring of the ones that were there when my eldest was in nursery seven years ago. I fully expect to have many battles with my boy about wanting to bring one home, he adores snails.

Karrie

 

Aaaaw bless, lots of young children seem to. You could agree to him having one but stress to him the responsibilities of feeding, watering it and general care. I think pets are a fantastic way for children to feel more responsible and grown up, as wel as they can be a lot of fun.

 

I would recommend just taking one, as you will already know, they can grow huge and if you only have one, you won't have any eggs. Snails are not exactly pets which require company, so one will be more than happy on it's own. They are a great first pet to start on as upkeep is minimal, they don't require expensive, lavish enclosures, and they are cheap to feed.

 

You may find these useful, should you agree to one (or more)

 

http://arachnophiliac.co.uk/burrow/careshe..._care_sheet.htm

 

http://exoticpets.about.com/cs/rarespecies/p/landsnails.htm

 

Good luck!

 

Andrea

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

At half term one of our snails died xD and since then the other has lived with me...but when I came home tonight I thought there were eggs in the tank...but I was wrong...there are lots and lots of tiny baby snails! :o

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cute! Have fun with re-homing. After the school holidays a nearby nursery had 40 little snails to find good homes for. It took a while! I got one for a friend's son (with permission :o ) for his Birthday & at Christmas they got 2 more for his brothers! So now, when they go on holiday I have 3 GALS in residence!

Nona

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 years later...

Sorry to jump onto an old thread but has anyone got a risk assessment for GALS they wouldn't mind sharing? Save me reinventing the wheel! Many thanks! Our GALS are on their way!!

 

Confession time!

 

We have had a Giant African land Snail for a few years now.......and.......I have never 'risk assessed' him.........hmmm..........he's really not very 'risky' :blink:

 

Enjoy - how many are you getting? :1b

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well the children chose, so we are getting 2 normal ones and 1albino, although not sure who's more excited!!

 

Lovely! :1b

 

Are you concerned about the egg/baby situation? :blink:

 

We had ours from a 'baby' and he has obviously never been 'darted' - apparently they 'fire love darts' at each others necks - well whatever floats your boat :blink: xD :lol: xD

 

Just a little tip - they will retreat into their shells if they get cold........don't do what one of my pre-school mums did - she decided hers had died and they had a burial (complete with prayers) - another friend asked "are you really sure that he is dead"?.......so they exhumed the body and guess what - he wasn't :oxD :lol: xD

 

Enjoy! :1b

Link to comment
Share on other sites

risk assessment should include hand washing after handling as there is a very small chance of salmonella from GALS

 

Good point finleysmaid.........as you can probably tell - I'm not hugely into risk assessing - just use the old common sense!!! ;)xD

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest sn0wdr0p

We haven't had much luck with pets here in my setting. A few years ago we had GALS which produced loads of babies(100s) which we struggled to give away so the next time I froze the eggs. Sadly one of out little ones managed to knock the tank and one which was stuck upside down on the roof fell and broke his shell and sadly died.

 

Then we tried stick insects - which escaped! Que terrified staff when coming across them on a number of occasions.

 

Then the guinea pigs - two had a fight and one of them bit the others ear badly. Their ears have lots of blood vessels and one was pierced and I got a call when at home from as staff member asking me to come in because there was blood spurting everywhere. Blinkin exageration I thought until I got there and found blood all over the wall, window, floor and the child who had been nearest to them. They now live in our garden as I am not chancing that happening again.

 

Two years ago we hatched chicks. It was nearly as stressful as giving birth myself. At two in the morning I was sat trying to help one struggle to hatch and had to very carefully use tweezers to help out. On the plus side six out of ten hatched and now happily roam my sisters large garden - apart from the ones the fox got.

 

At the moment we are pet free and I do feel a bit guilty that we don't have any and sometimes I do consider it. I do have a very very placid (lazy) cavalier king charles spaniel which I suppose I could take in sometimes. Maybe it's a bit like having a baby in that you soon forget the pain and start planning your next one. Any suggestions?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We used to have snails but the building was too cold at the weekends and they kept sealing themselves up. In our new building we have 2 guinea pigs, 2 rabbits, a hamster and 2 gerbils. The gerbils are best pet! They are always busy and have been brilliant for settling crying children. The hamster is boring and the guinea pigs hide all the time. The rabbits are popular with our out of schoolers. At the moment the rabbits and guineas are in indoor cages but as soon as the weather improves they'll be back outside.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. (Privacy Policy)