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How would you respond to staff completing a display that basically involved children in painting or covering pre-cut shapes in adult chosen colours...to then be assembled by adults to create a picture e.g...some circles painted pink...and letters collaged over in tissue paper....assembled to make a 'three pigs' display.?

To me this isn't really a valuable activity for children at all...and its something I have raised with staff before...that children shouldn't create work for display but their own work should be displayed.....

I see not benefit in this type of product at all...it frustrates me ...

but now its up...what do I do...do I raise the issue or let it go?...and how do I approach it - on one hand they did do a display ....if I tell them there's an issue they likely wont bother again...but if I don't tell them...i'll have more of the same. :(

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do you do ecers r - or any other type of rating for you provision - look at the display section and rate it with your staff - talk about why the display only gets a certain score/rating - discuss how the display could get a better rating.

discuss what they think the children got out of the activity - how do they think they could have changed the activity so the children got more out of the activity.

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If this is your only display board then you must talk to staff and show them what is acceptable and what isn't. I have 3 very large boards. 2 are all childrens work only, one is adults work with children's assistance or only adults.

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Our displays are are only slightly enhanced : for example the back drop is children's work , painting with fly swatters and squirts paint ( resources only supplied) , my input a heart ( children painted) and the typed words home is where the heart is , all the rest are children's work and photos and letters from home , pictures they created ( remind staff - it's in the process not the product ! )

Children get involved , parents can see that making the effort to link in with learning and partnership , we put their items to use and the children help to decide what to put up and where.

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I understand your point but actually without stating the obvious there is a lot of fine motor skills that go into both scrunching and glueing tissue paper , along with hand eye coordination and larger motor control.

Our setting has a balance between independent work that is displayed , clearly labelled to explain what the objective is and more obvious staff involved displays such as you mention above. Larger displays such as this also allow those children whom may not be as confident of their skills to gain a sense of achievement alongside a general sense for all of working together .

Edited by Guest
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I understand your point but actually without stating the obvious there is a lot of fine motor skills that go into both scrunching and glueing tissue paper , along with hand eye coordination and larger motor control.

Our setting has a balance between independent work that is displayed , clearly labelled to explain what the objective is and more obvious staff involved displays such as you mention above. Larger displays such as this also allow those children whom may not be as confident of their skills to gain a sense of achievement alongside a general sense for all of working together .

Actually with our lot younger group this year I would totally agree on this

We have been 'reflecting' ;) on our craft/art whatever you call it and when we leave resources without much input on a table the children aren't involved in what they are doing at all in fact some days it is hardly touched - children don't even seem to know that the glue side is the side that they put on the paper!

We have come to the decision that parents don't do this type of activity with them at home anymore and therefore small adult led group work is needed in this area too ... very sad :( But it is working, as we know when an adult is doing anything with the children they become involved it was like 'bees round a honey pot' at our tissue scrunching table yesterday xD Hopefully by Feb / March time having shown & modelled lots of creative activities with adults they will be more independent and confident to produce their own works of art?! We will reflect in March!

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'..if I tell them there's an issue they likely wont bother again....' You don't want them to do it again so that would sort it :)

 

As many above we do sometimes create displays that are adult initiated, particularly if based on a theme or favourite book, as well as all the valuable skills above its a useful 'team building' activity for the children to work as a group, planning and extending ideas, maybe a starting place with staff would be to ask them what they think the children get out of it and then observe it ....are they giving chn opportunities to express ideas, plan what they'll need, discuss who's going to do what, what fine motor skills are they demonstrating, did they take a risk by going up the step ladder to stick it on the wall ;-p

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I compiled a display policy. I have included my vision of it stemming from child's interest but also contrasting with other displays.

Perhaps a discussion at a staff meeting praising what was good about the display and looking at spaces available and looking at it through other eyes such as children or visitors.

Displays can be used for a variety of reasons. Valuing & celebrating children' s achievement, information or inspiration. Whoever is creating the display needs to think and plan.

Whether you like it or not whoever put it up has put time & effort into it. Expressing how much this is worth to you and then suggesting next time you might want to think about adding... Why don't you talk me through your plan next time....... Will show your appreciation and that you want to her to continue.

I read through the blog and it is a very good piece of work. I will pass onto my team.

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Last year I divided our display boards into squares and each child had their own square. Each square had the child's photo and name in it, and space for displaying whatever the child wanted. They ended up having pieces of craft, art work, photo's, speech bubbles etc in them. For the first half term this was great, mine, the children's and the parents enthusiasm was high, but it did dwindle away. For my part I have realised that as we had such a large group, I needed some staff input and help (which was not forthcoming) The boards also needed to be refreshed on a regular basis to keep the children and parents interest. It was a really great idea (thank you ABC does) I am tempted to introduce it again and get no make the staff get involved and help me!! We are just beginning to Christmas everything in our room so will do this in the new year.

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I think it is helpful to reflect on the characteristics of effective learning - I don't see this type of activity as being creative to be honest. The children may get some PD practice but that's about all. It won't enable children to make choices or select their own materials or develop their own ways of doing things.

The educational programme for EAD also helps reflect on the way we develop activities and experiences: Expressive arts and design involves enabling children to explore and play with a wide range of media and materials, as well as providing opportunities and encouragement for sharing their thoughts, ideas and feelings through a variety of activities in art, music, movement, dance, role play, and design and technology.

It cries out for some very skilled sustained shared thinking to work out how they might represent the image. They might come up with something far more sophisticated!

Cx

Edited by catma
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