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Painting/large mark-making provision - outdoors


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Hi

Could I ask what others do for painting provision outdoors? We always have paintbrushes, rollers and water jugs available as well as large chalks. We have a huge roll of paper and some water colour paints which the children seem to like as they can take all the colours with them! If I want to do any other 'big art' then I set that up as an extra as I find that it needs that extra bit of supervision! We try to make our outdoor provision different to what is offered indoors but I find myself a bit stuck with painting?

Would love to hear your ideas

Thanks again!

Green Hippo x

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Thanks Rea, love the website! I do these sorts of things although probably not enough but tend to offer as an extra activity on 1 or 2 days not continuously due to the supervision element! Wondering what might we offer on a continuous basis which is different to inside. We have our large paper which the children can pull out as big as they like and secure on ground with rocks. Need to get clips secured to wall/side of playhouse so they can choose to pin it up.

Thanks, Green hippo x

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why are you worried about the supervision? seems from your post that this might be the problem. If you look at the teacher tom website he allows the children to paint anything! it is water based paint so it will come off most things. Or perhaps this is about getting the children on board and bying in to a painting area?

 

i am just about to paint the inside of the play house with blackboard paint to provide more permanent mark making. large cardboard boxes make great easels too. playground chalk is great because it comes off. large pieces of acetate fixed to fences/walls make a good backdrop for pegging on paper etc. (we tend to use large bits of cardboard outside rather than paper because it can cope with the damp and some rain without breaking

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Can anyone point me in the direction of a catalogue that sells different types of mark making equipment so I can differentiate resources within mark making provision. Spent ages googling and found 'claws' which look fab but are pricey. Need different things to support chdn with diff types of grip. LA been in and said 3 levels of challenge within mark making area is good but must offer appropriate range of resources - diff widths of pencils, fat markers, and crayons & felt tips not enough. Anyone any ideas?

Also good idea to make writing more portable....paint kettles from B&Q filled with notebooks, markers. And want to make some mini 'market trader type' aprons for mark making things. Need more variety of things to fill these objects with! Top tips appreciated.

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I usually trawl the pound shops and markets for mark making things, very rarely got the funds to buy from catalogues and you can get pens with favourite characters on, although I just read the list of what you already have again and I cant think of anything to add unless they want to see playdough, threading, goop type actitives!

Try putting the paper on the underside of the table so the children have to lie down to draw and use different types and shapes of paper.Cheap card shops and save your envelopes, newspapers etc at home. Collect forms from the post office and bank, good to ask first if you want loads. I'd try charity shops for aprons you can cut down and small bags to carry the equipment in or ask your parents if they have anything to spare.

A reason for writing is important too. :1b

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Finlaysmaid - we only limit the 'messier' of activities e.g. those that involve throwing things with paint on or spraying as we find that there needs someone to be around to ensure aprons are put on properly (unfortunately we don't have any full cover-alls) and to refill etc. We encourage the children to be as independent as possible but in being independent they don't always manage to cover their clothes or manage to open the sprays to re-fill. There are only 2 of us (3 at some times) so we make sure that we offer these activities when there is that extra person. All the other painting resources are offered continuously and they are allowed to paint different surfaces - paper, floor, cardboard etc. Maybe I'm doing it all wrong? As much as I want the children to explore and be creative I don't want to send children home covered!

On a different note, I'm interested to read how other's respond to the differentiated mark-making question from above. As much as I understand the need to (and do) offer different types of resources and activities for different abilities, I don't want to limit their choices? Is it more about encouraging children of differing abilities to use 'the right' resources as opposed to limiting choices? I want to challenge the children but not want to take away from them the decisions about resources etc which is so important for them. I'm getting myself in a bit of a pickle about whether I need to re-look at how I set up my provision?

Green Hippo x

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Please don't get yourself in a pickle. We all question the things we do sometimes, but hey that's a good thing isn't it, that's what makes a reflective practitioner, and that's what you are.:)

Before adding any other resources can I suggest you take sometime to look deeply into how the children use whats on offer,then perhaps you can introduce other objects to enhance their play and learning.

It's not always about giving them everything.:)

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Can anyone point me in the direction of a catalogue that sells different types of mark making equipment so I can differentiate resources within mark making provision. Spent ages googling and found 'claws' which look fab but are pricey. Need different things to support chdn with diff types of grip. LA been in and said 3 levels of challenge within mark making area is good but must offer appropriate range of resources - diff widths of pencils, fat markers, and crayons & felt tips not enough. Anyone any ideas?

Also good idea to make writing more portable....paint kettles from B&Q filled with notebooks, markers. And want to make some mini 'market trader type' aprons for mark making things. Need more variety of things to fill these objects with! Top tips appreciated.

try the cosy catalogue...fantastic resources dificlut to find elsewhere! (not online yet you need to ring for a catalogue)

 

Finlaysmaid - we only limit the 'messier' of activities e.g. those that involve throwing things with paint on or spraying as we find that there needs someone to be around to ensure aprons are put on properly (unfortunately we don't have any full cover-alls) and to refill etc. We encourage the children to be as independent as possible but in being independent they don't always manage to cover their clothes or manage to open the sprays to re-fill. There are only 2 of us (3 at some times) so we make sure that we offer these activities when there is that extra person. All the other painting resources are offered continuously and they are allowed to paint different surfaces - paper, floor, cardboard etc. Maybe I'm doing it all wrong? As much as I want the children to explore and be creative I don't want to send children home covered!

 

Green Hippo x

Firstly i think i owe you an apology....the idea of my post was to get info not be critical....dont think i got the emphasis right at all!!

i am incredibly impressed that as a school setting you are doing ANY of these things...i can't tell you how many schools i am still visiting who would not allow this EVER!! and school uniform is expensive so you do need to take some care (unfortunately!)

we should always question our practise....but with this sometimes comes doubt. Are your children enjoying and achieving? if yes then you are doing things well ...if no then i guess you need to see where the gaps are. I would be very surprised (having spoken together before) that your children are not doing well....you can tell a lot from peoples posts :1b :1b :1b :wub:

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Thanks for your help and support. I'm my own worst critic - I feel I get to the point where I think I'm 'sorted' and happy with what we are doing and planning to do then go and read something or hear that someone does something different and doubt myself!

You don't need to apologise Finlaysmaid! Do you offer 'big art' all the time? Our other issue is resources - we have to order all our paint etc at the beginning of the year and so I can't offer too much continuously as we simply end up having to buy it out of our own pocket! I use powder paint inside that the children mix themselves and the big tubs last all year as the children have very clear rules about how much to use etc. The water-colour solid paints are good outdoors as they last for ages and are very transportable.

Thanks

Green Hippo x

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Green Hippo, I don't really have anything to add on the ideas except to say to Jackie25 that I second the recommendation for Cosy to get 'different' stuff from but I did want to say that how much you care about your children, practice and provision really does shine through in your posts.

I don't ever want you to feel bad or worried about what you do but at the same time it does reassure me to read and see that I'm not the only person who never feels like they got it 'right'! I pick up lots of ideas from you and your passion for what you do often re-motivates me when I'm feeling low.

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no i don't offer big art all the time(as a charity we also have to be careful with resources) but do remember that expressive art and design covers ALL creative activities so if we aren't doing big painting we might be doing playdough or role play or story making or music etc etc etc!

 

oh and whilst we are on the subject i have a list of jobs to do the size of my arm....i constantly beat myself up about it! but as i get older i am more realistic that the sky won't fall down if i don't do it all today! ;)

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Thanks for everyone's ideas....will get a cosy catalogue. Often trawl pound shops but somehow blagged a little bit of cash from budget so wanted to spend it quick before it's gone!

In response to Green Hippo's Q ...I asked this during the LA visit and was told let them choose own mark making resources at first but then extend those needing more challenge by saying 'why don't you try this....' I guess as long as they get the experience of more challenging tools they can balance this with their own choices.

Being new to nursery (previously reception) I now very much appreciate all the hard work and training that goes into helping children look after resources. I have a feeling will get lovely things but they will have all disappeared within 10 seconds! Like concept of transportation but retrieving to 'reset' some areas of learning is a bit of a 'mare'! Items generally being hidden down sofas/behind cupboards or taken home!

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Green Hippo, I don't really have anything to add on the ideas except to say to Jackie25 that I second the recommendation for Cosy to get 'different' stuff from but I did want to say that how much you care about your children, practice and provision really does shine through in your posts.

I don't ever want you to feel bad or worried about what you do but at the same time it does reassure me to read and see that I'm not the only person who never feels like they got it 'right'! I pick up lots of ideas from you and your passion for what you do often re-motivates me when I'm feeling low.

You've nearly made me cry HelenD26! I do love what I do so much but really drive myself mad sometimes over-thinking what I do!

You've given me some great ideas too.

Keep up the good work everyone.

Here's to the FSF!

Green Hippo x

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Like concept of transportation but retrieving to 'reset' some areas of learning is a bit of a 'mare'! Items generally being hidden down sofas/behind cupboards or taken home!

Humm like the flippin new (and rather lovely) large marbles that i bought on holiday (and i mean large they are the size of a golfball) which have all in the space of 3 hours disappeared....WHERE ARE THEY????????

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Humm like the flippin new (and rather lovely) large marbles that i bought on holiday (and i mean large they are the size of a golfball) which have all in the space of 3 hours disappeared....WHERE ARE THEY????????

Oh no! Finleysmaid has lost her marbles :o

Join the club - lost mine way back ;)xDxDxD

Fab photos Wildflowers! :1b

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Hi all,

thank you as always for all your help and support.

I've decided to split my class into 3 groups to work on their fine-motor skills - split by ability. Have bought a wonderful Finger-gym book which has hundreds of great ideas to work on different areas which is going to be great, I just need to decide where to start!

My thoughts (from Jackie25's post) have been on providing the 'right' mark-making tools and what is actually 'right' for different levels of pencil-grip. I'm sorry if this sounds like a very stupid question but is it definitely right to encourage those with a less developed pencil grip to use thicker mark-making tools and the more developed, the thinner ones? If those with a less developed grip prefer or choose a thinner pencil would you automatically encourage them to pick up a thicker one or only if they were struggling to use the thinner pencil? These are all things that I have 'picked-up' from advice/things that I have read etc but I don't think I have ever seen it written down as definite guidance to follow, if you see what I mean?

Any ideas and advice would be greatly appreciated as always

Green Hippo xx

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We use chunky triangular colouring pencils for everything and paint brushes of the same size, to encourage correct grip and control. No think felt tips or whiteboard markers etc. I think it's important to establish good habits from start, so remind them by modelling the grip as needed. For large scale mark making outside we use pieces of chalk, large brushes and small paint rollers.

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Hi all,

thank you as always for all your help and support.

I've decided to split my class into 3 groups to work on their fine-motor skills - split by ability. Have bought a wonderful Finger-gym book which has hundreds of great ideas to work on different areas which is going to be great, I just need to decide where to start!

My thoughts (from Jackie25's post) have been on providing the 'right' mark-making tools and what is actually 'right' for different levels of pencil-grip. I'm sorry if this sounds like a very stupid question but is it definitely right to encourage those with a less developed pencil grip to use thicker mark-making tools and the more developed, the thinner ones? If those with a less developed grip prefer or choose a thinner pencil would you automatically encourage them to pick up a thicker one or only if they were struggling to use the thinner pencil? These are all things that I have 'picked-up' from advice/things that I have read etc but I don't think I have ever seen it written down as definite guidance to follow, if you see what I mean?

Any ideas and advice would be greatly appreciated

 

Green Hippo xx

What finger gym book do you recommend?
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What finger gym book do you recommend?

I've bought Finger Gym - Developmental Games to improve language, fine motor skills and handwriting by Galina Dolya and Judy Holder. They recommend having a collection of finger gym equipment for children to explore and then there are LOADS of exercises focusing on different types of skills. It recommends that all children practise and it doesn't really differentiate for level of skill. This is where it may become confusing in deciding what to choose. I suppose the best place to start is in deciding what my groups need at the moment and finding suitable activities. There's just such a lot of different things to practise that I know I will feel that they need to practise everything all the time!

Green Hippo x

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