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Accident - Concerned Parent.


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Hello all,

 

One of the children at the setting recently had an accident where he banged his head (cur and bruised), on a table edge after running around with another child.

 

We dealt with it by applying icepack and notifying the parents, etc.

 

One of the parents is asking if we can make our tables any safer and is also requesting a copy of the accident form for her records. The parent has also told us that her child says he was pushed by the child he was playing with - but this wasn't the case and we have said so.

 

How would you deal with this?

 

Thanks,

duggy.

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I would reflect on the accident and consider whether it would be reasonable to make changes. e.g. does that table have an unusually sharp edge or was it appropriate for the children to be running in that area of the setting?

 

If you do make changes then let the parent know.

 

Make notes of all of the conversations you have had and any reviews of your practice just in case of complaints.

 

Obviously you can't be held responsible for children pushing each other even if it did happen - they have to allowed to play!

 

I can't see that there's much else you can do.

Edited by Upsy Daisy
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Hello Upsy Daisy,

 

Thanks for your advice.

 

The table's not any more dangerous than any of our others - it was bought from a dedicated nurery years supplier and has rounded edges, etc.

 

We have a blanket 'No Running' policy, and we did advise the parent of this.

 

We'll reflect on the incident and makes notes as you suggest.

 

Thanks very much for your advice.

 

duggy.

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Hi duggy......oh dear......we have all 'been there'.......sound advice from everyone already - just thought I would add this for you and anyone else who may be interested.......

 

At recent First Aid training we were discussing 'head injuries' one of the practitioners on the course kindly shared the following (so this is what goes home with child - obviously all normal completing of accident record is carried out)

 

Your child today has sustained a bump on the head. Please contact your G.P. or Casualty Department at your local hospital if any of the following symptons occur:

 

1. Severe headache

2. Persistent vomiting

3. Unusual drowsiness

4. There is a disturbance of vision

5. Strange behaviour

6. You are worried about the injury

 

Child's name.......................

 

Date................

 

Time of injury..............

 

Comments.............

 

Hope this is useful

Sunnyday

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The table's not any more dangerous than any of our others - it was bought from a dedicated nurery years supplier and has rounded edges, etc.

 

We have a blanket 'No Running' policy, and we did advise the parent of this.

 

Maybe this mum just doesn't like to think that her son is responsible for his own injury, in which case there's not much you can do apart from keep meticulous records.

 

I would just accept that you are taking reasonable care in line with other similar settings and try not to worry about it.

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Just to add ....

 

If you do make any review, and any subsequent actions (or the decision no action is necessary!) I think you have to add this to the accident report.

 

:o

OK, thanks for that, too!

 

 

Hi duggy......oh dear......we have all 'been there'.......sound advice from everyone already - just thought I would add this for you and anyone else who may be interested.......

 

At recent First Aid training we were discussing 'head injuries' one of the practitioners on the course kindly shared the following (so this is what goes home with child - obviously all normal completing of accident record is carried out)

 

Your child today has sustained a bump on the head. Please contact your G.P. or Casualty Department at your local hospital if any of the following symptons occur:

 

1. Severe headache

2. Persistent vomiting

3. Unusual drowsiness

4. There is a disturbance of vision

5. Strange behaviour

6. You are worried about the injury

 

Child's name.......................

 

Date................

 

Time of injury..............

 

Comments.............

 

Hope this is useful

Sunnyday

That's good to know - thanks, sunnyday.

 

 

Maybe this mum just doesn't like to think that her son is responsible for his own injury, in which case there's not much you can do apart from keep meticulous records.

 

I would just accept that you are taking reasonable care in line with other similar settings and try not to worry about it.

Yes, I think you're right.
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Good advice already, but do you monitor accidents and where they happen? You could just look back at the records and work out how many accidents have been logged and how many have been caused by the table! I suggest it's likely to be rare! You could then speak to the parent and be able to tell them the facts and figures i.e. over the last year there have been X number of accidents and only 1 has involved the table. Perhaps that would put the 'dangerous table' into context.

Hope the reaction calms down quickly

Gruffalo2

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I would assure her that the tables have been checked and that you have reflected on how you could prevent such accidents happening again. Do i misunderstand the original post though??Didn't she have a copy of your accident report at the time?? I thought this was compulsory...............particularly importnat with bumps to the head, but certainly good practice anyway?

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well, I'm not certain now upsydaisy.(!).......but it's good practice anyway...........if the parent had to take the child to hospital, they have a written record of what exactly happened, where, when and what treatment you gave.It covers the parents too, if questions arise about the child's safety.I've done it this way for years.i buy double paged accident books from the Playgroup network

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We record everything just to cover ourselves. If its a very minor injury we write a sticky label, attatch it to the child at home-time and get the parent to sign the book.If the accident is more serious or involves a head bump we use carbon paper to give parent a copy. We also now phone the parent and let them decide if they wish to collect their child or leave them for the rest of the day.They always say no but at least it has pre-warned them.

I do find now that parents are becoming more anxious and most accidents are caused now by children tripping over their own feet!!!!

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My grandson had an accident where he tripped over an adults foot, slipped under the table and caught the corner of his eye underneath the table - this are well known tables - he had a deep cut very near his eye which bled profusely, still has the scar. There rwas eally nothing we could have done to prevent it, the lady concerned was mortified. There was no sharp edges etc. Sometimes accidents just happen and their is nothing you can do about it.

 

We dont give copies of accidents to parents but get them to sign the accident book.

 

smiles

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Hi everyone,

 

An interesting thread. Just thought I would add, a parent recently commented to me that each time her child has a little accident at home, she is told in a serious little voice that she needs to fill out an accident form for her!!!!!!

 

Lesley :o

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As well as getting the accident book signed we also send a form home. This says

 

Your child _________________

 

bumped / bruised / cut / other _________________

their

head / arm / leg / back / other __________________

 

__________________________________________

at Pre-School today.

We treated it with ___________________________

 

__________________________________________

 

Signed _________________ Date _________

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  • 2 weeks later...

Great thread- Thank you very much! I have just taken over a nursery and need to change the way we deal with accidents. I have only been told that serious accidents(i.e there is blood) go into the accident book- which didn't have any entries after 10.09.08- lol!

 

Last week a lovely tree was cut down in our garden as a child received a nasty cut on his head. Even though it was the only incident of it's kind in the trees 23 years. It does seem that some parents (and higher management) are too health and safety conscious, and are not prepared to give the children some risk! Especially with all of these dangerous tables and trees about!

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Last week a lovely tree was cut down in our garden as a child received a nasty cut on his head. Even though it was the only incident of it's kind in the trees 23 years.

Oh my! Wouldn't a bit of judicious pruning have been more in order, if indeed any action was necessary? I'm going to have a tabloid moment here - but it really is health and safety gone mad!

 

What I wouldn't give for a lovely well established tree in my outdoor space - to think of one being cut down like this makes me want to weep. It sounds as if you have an interesting challenge here - how can we support children to learn to assess and manage risk if the adults respond like this?

 

Good luck with your new job!

 

Maz

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Last week a lovely tree was cut down in our garden as a child received a nasty cut on his head. Even though it was the only incident of it's kind in the trees 23 years. It does seem that some parents (and higher management) are too health and safety conscious, and are not prepared to give the children some risk! Especially with all of these dangerous tables and trees about!

 

 

gosh, a bit excessive, unless the tree was old and about to fall over...

 

we had a child hit his head on our tree twice, he was a bit fast and not looking where he was going! ...

 

so we wrapped bubble wrap around the tree and if he did it again it did not hurt him, also flagged the tree as being there... worked...

 

Ofsted loved it, said we would always be remembered as the setting with the bubble wrapped tree..

 

Inge

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Muckyduck.....................I note ALL accidents in my book, even the 'non-blood' variety.Sometimes, you can't see what's going on inside(!) and I would always err on the side of caution. And it's another reason to give the parent a copy of the accident form.............if something cropped up later that day and the child had to go to hospital, everyone has a record of exactly what happened and when/where.When I was setting up my new group, Ofsted told me they had received a formal complaint that accused me of not putting a 'very serious head injury' into my accident book at my old setting: this meant they would not confirm my registration until it had been thoroughly investigated.I had to go to their offices to answer the claim and I said I couldn't: I had NEVER had a serious accident in the setting, and furthermore, all accidents, however trivial were noted and reported to parents. I was then told to 'go away and think about it, to see if you can rememember when it was'.................as if I was lying.Ofsted then asked the committee to provide the accident book and i had to go back again to a meeting, where I was asked again if i could remember 'the accident'.Well, I told the truth....no, i couldn't.So, they handed me the book and asked me to read through it, which I did and couldn't see anything of any great worry and said so.the inspector asked me to go through it againand i then spotted an entry where a child had been hit on the head by a LEGO (not even a Duplo one!) brick, and it had left a small red mark on his forehead.THIS was the 'very serious head injury'!!! I looked at the book, then looked at the inspector, who smiled at me..........I looked at the book again and back at him and I asked...is THIS what they're talking about???? and yes, it was: of course, the inspector was very apologetic, and he said it was being logged as a spurious, time-wasting and viscious complaint against me.I was furious, as you can imagine, but the point is................that well-written entry saved me from serious trouble.I had put in that the child had been comforted when it happened,and a cold compress had been applied( a wet paper towel) no medical treatment was necessary at the time ( no cut, no bruise, just a small red mark), I had checked every 15 minutes for an hour that it was ok and that the child had shown no adverse reaction.YES, it was a simple thing:but it saved my reputation and my new setting.So, you can see why I'm so keen on putting accidents down in the book!

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Why on earth did they put you through all that if they had already decided it was malicious? That seems very cruel.

 

I put any bump which leaves a mark or causes a child to cry in my accident book. As you say, Narnia, you can't see what's happening inside. Even so I still had a sticky moment a couple of weeks ago. A toddler overbalanced a bit while standing by my legs and bumped his face on my knee. He didn't cry or seem at all worried so I didn't bother with the accident book. When he arrived the next morning his Mum showed me a bruise on the inside of his lip where his teeth had bumped it and asked if I knew anything about it. I was embarrassed and felt that I looked very unprofessional when I had to tell her about the bump. If I'd put it in the book it would have been a lot better. Luckily she's a reasonable sensible mum so I just wrote it in my incident book and she signed it happily - phew!

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Narnia- I'm sorry that you had to go through all of that- it sounds as if it was dreadful!

 

One of the first things I did when I started at the setting was to impress upon the importance of using the accident book to my nn. Her views were clear and she said that it was stupid! I have written about 15 accidents since Sept- which was more than in the previous 2 years of the book. I am currently re-doing the format to include a place for the parent to sign, and also a 'bumped head' note to send home. I am also starting an incident book as there has never been one in the nurseries 29 years.

I completely agree that that you can't see what is inside. I hope my post did not come accross that I did not put any accidents in unless there was blood- that is only what I was told. Well this, and several others things- such as that as long as I can see them out of the kitchen window, all of the 23 chidlren can be outside with my nn! Also rectifying the timetable issue to ensure that this does not happen!

 

MuckyDuck

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no, I realised it was only what you were told :o Your NN might think it's 'stupid'........but would she still feel that if challenged by a parent, after an incident, or threatened with being sued?

 

upsy daisy...................... i think they'd had the original complaint from my accusers, so quizzed me, then asked to see their accident book after i said that i always noted everything.................so it caught them out and cleared me!

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