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Diwali


Deb
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Don't tend to do food for Diwali, We do mendhi patterns on hand templates. We help the children to draw around their hands and then we stick them to lollysticks, they dribble glue over the template and glitter or use coloured sand on top. We make the little lamps too, but we keep them until Christmas and re-use them as decorations.

 

If somebody comes on with some food ideas this year, I may well give them a go.

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Hi

I used a tin of condensed milk and 450g of dessicated coconut and a variety of food colouring to make little round sweets. Then dusted them in icing sugar. The children really enjoyed making these last yera, I'm repeating it this year as well as-

making Divali cards (TA's idea) by putting a paper doily on paper and dabing diffrent coloured paint ontop, decorating Rama, Sita and Hanumnan masks, matching numbered candles to diva lamps, making playdough divas, making rangoli paterns with coloured rice...

and now making menhi hand patterns (thank you Panders!)

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I am going to talk about it next week because it falls on the weekend......thanks for all the ideas...we will mkae clay tea light holders as well as chappattis :o

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We don't make sweets because of the nut content, we usually have a parent who comes in to make chapattis, haven't managed to find a volunteer yet!

 

We use chalks on the floor outside to make rangoli patterns, and the ones we make on paper (I use black sugar paper as the colours stand out more) we stick to the floor in the home corner and in the cloakroom in keeping with the Hindu tradition of welcoming.

 

We are also going to make some firework pictures as they form a big part of celebrations, but haven't quite decided how to make them yet - either flicking paint or dribbling glue and sprinking with glitter, either way I'll do one now and one for Bonfire Night.

 

We have also been cleaning our home corner in preparation for Diwali and I'm going to set up a small shrine area in the home corner to stimulate discussion and aspects of respect for other cultures and beliefs.

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Inviting parents to come and watch simple Rama and Sita drama. Children will make coriander dip (cheating on chapatis) and coconut cake to take with a little cup of indian tea. We will finish off with some dancing and party poppers. They will also be able to see what we have been doing over the 2 day input - cards,mendhi,rangoli,diva lamp making and a range of self- selected activities to fit with the theme. A busy week I anticipate but I love this festival. Hope your celebration goes well. luluj

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Sparlebox has a Diwali word mat if that is of any use to anyone........

 

We are going to make 'diva lights'..........use up some of the bargain tea-lights I bought about a hundred years ago!!! :o

 

Is the 'diva' pronounced 'deevah' - that's how I say it but I'm not sure xD

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found these which I got from FSF ages ago, thanks to whoever posted them originally!

You can check the author of a word document by clicking on the office button, then 'prepare' in the drop down menu and then 'properties' in the pop-out menu from there.

 

One of them is from Peggy, and the other I'm fairly sure is from you, LJW (assuming your husband is called Richard?). :o

 

Are these in the resources section Peggy?

 

Maz

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Just remembered the song we learn for Diwali. Its really simple, sung to the tune of London's Burning.

 

Diwali's here, Diwali's here,

Light the diva, Light the diva,

Shine, Shine, Shine, Shine,

Light the way home, Light the way home.

 

Very easy to learn for even young children. We put actions to it as well.

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We have been making lanterns with black card and tissue paper, we are going to be making sweets with coconut and we have a local shop owner/friend coming in to share how she celebrates diwali with her children and show us how to wear/arrange a sari.

 

Rachel

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We won't be doing any festivals other than christian ones.

 

We have been told it isn't relevant to our children's learning because they are all white british christians and to incorporate multicultural resources into our setting, which is what we do anyway.

 

I can understand the reasoning behind it , but not sure how I feel about it.

 

Motherclangerx

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We won't be doing any festivals other than christian ones.

 

We have been told it isn't relevant to our children's learning because they are all white british christians and to incorporate multicultural resources into our setting, which is what we do anyway.

 

I can understand the reasoning behind it , but not sure how I feel about it.

 

Motherclangerx

 

Wow!.......May I ask who told you that Motherclanger?

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Wow Motherclanger, who has told you to do this?

 

I know there are still many practitioners who question whether it is their place to celebrate other festivals - especially if there are no children in the setting who would be celebrating these festivals with their families. Personally, I choose to celebrate some festivals but not all festivals, and we rarely have any children of an ethnic background or practising Christian background. We do have the usual multicultural resources scattered about the different areas.

 

Some festivals can be difficult to celebrate by giving it the proper attention to detail, especially if practitioners do not have any real connection with the festival, so I do understand the reason for you being told not to do it anymore, but would like to know who has told you not to do it.

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