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Hi, just a quick question.

 

When we started at Preschool we didn't have anyone in nappies, but of course, over the years things have changed, and we now do have children in nappies. This amounts to maybe one or two changes a day going in the bin, not a great amount.

 

What I want to know is, what do we DO with them, as I say, currently they just go in the bin, as it's a smaller amount than a household would generate. I'm not sure, with such a small amount, whether it's financially sensible to have a chemical waste contract for them.

 

Any thoughts?

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We've had similar thoughts about this too. In our case it was a problem of what to do with them immediately after changing - we can't put them in the bin inside the hall, but going outside to the bin isn't always easy or practical.

 

I just bought one of those domestic nappy disposal units - the ones that bag them up in a sort of sausage thing. Then when it is full I put it in the rubbish bin outside.

 

Seems to be working for us at the moment!

 

Maz

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we did this at first I got my bin from a charity shop and a friend got hers for free from freecycle. However our early years team said that we should have them disposed of by contract and not to put them in the bin. so like most pre-schools we found the cost too much so we double bag and send them home. we have had no real probs with this apart from the odd smelly one which we re-bag plus parents dont mind.

sue

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Where did you get it from?

Asda. Although suewhit had much better sources! I find I lack the patience to do a trawl of charity shops etc when I need something!

 

I can't really understand the argument that your LA gave suewhit: I can understand if you have a big day nursery where you change lots and lots of children every day, but our group's 'output' would be less than a family's with one baby or toddler wearing nappies. Where do you store the nappies that are awaiting collection by parents?

 

Perhaps I should email my development worker and ask her opinion!

 

Maz

Edited by HappyMaz
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Our chairperson looked into this quite deeply, we are a packaway in a village hall, according to the district council you can put one bin bag full of nappies out for normal collection once a week. Unfortunately for us we have to take the rubbish home daily as the hall will not allow us to use their bin store.....so parents currently take home nappies, not that there are many.....

 

Our development worker however feels that it is an infringment on childrens/parents human rights to make them take the nappies home......she can take them home then :o

Edited by Guest
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Unfortunately for us we have to take the rubbish home daily as the hall will not allow us to use their bin store.....so parents currently take home nappies, not that there are many.....

 

Our development worker however feels that it is an infringment on childrens/parents human rights to make them take the nappies home......she can take them home then :o

I'm sure there are rules and regulations about what a village hall must provide if you rent rooms from them - I have a pack of information somewhere.

 

I'm not so sure about the human rights issue of nappy disposal - that's a new one on me!

 

At the end of the day we have to find a solution that suits us - especially in the face of silly rules imposed by Parish Councils!

 

Maz

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Well whenever I've been questioned I say 'We've been advised to just put them in the bin'. Which is true, but it was my Mum who advised me :o

 

Nice to know it's not just us who've wondered anyway!

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Oh dear, I think I'm going to get shot down in flames for this one! Between September to December I would expect to being changing the odd nappy again, maybe 3 per week if we are unlucky! After that not very many at all. Our toilets are right beside the outside door, currently we have been bagging up the nappy, putting it in a small caddy like bin with a lid on kept just outside the door until the end of the session, I then take the bin down to Tesco's which I pass on my way home and dispose of nappies in their nappy changing area. Don't want to get a contract, don't want to send them home, but crikey why don't parents offer anyway and can't use main bin on the hall site, and I don't want them in my own domestic bin.

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I then take the bin down to Tesco's which I pass on my way home and dispose of nappies in their nappy changing area.

Is this with permission Panders? Othewise I have vision of you going 'undercover' so to speak!

 

Maz

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Panders I just loved your reply!!!

 

Must say I'm not looking forward to the nappy changing that there is bound to be in the autumn term - we only a very small group so it will not be a lot really.

 

Anyway - what do we do with nappies ........they are double bagged and sent home....this has never been a problem (so far)!

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we send ours home, parents are told this when their child starts. Have never had any complaints. I was told by my AT and during a course that to keep them at preschool we would have to have a contracter come and collect them for us, this would be far too costly and we dont change enough of them to warrant it really.

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We only have a very small amount -each nappy wrapped and stored in a small lined lidded bin and them empted with normal rubbish daily.

 

We're lucky that the small works unit next to us lets us use their bins....else it would be a take-home job (for us) I recon if I had to do that then I'd jsut take it to the nearest waste bin in the park -they're always full of dirty nappies anyway, and I'm pretty sure the council doesn't go through it sorted and sending the soiled nappyies as 'clinical waste'!!!!

 

xxxx

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Panders I just loved your reply!!!

 

Must say I'm not looking forward to the nappy changing that there is bound to be in the autumn term - we only a very small group so it will not be a lot really.

 

Anyway - what do we do with nappies ........they are double bagged and sent home....this has never been a problem (so far)!

 

Sounds like a novel kind of party bag system you have their Sunnyday

Edited by Panders
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Hi all, I am going to throw a spanner in the works now!!!!!

 

I have been looking into the disposal of nappies alot. We are a pack away and have a few children with nappies. A parent who works for the local council brought this to my attention and I now think that I should pass it on to you.

 

Nappies are a breading ground for all sorts of nasties, that is why we wrap and dispose of them a.s.a.p, When we hand the parents a dirty or soild nappy it has often been stored for more than an hour. In that hour the bacteria within the nappy bag/wrap has increased more than 50%.

This perticular parent said and i now qoute "The management of feces is an issue of hygiene, since feces contribute to spreading of diseases and intestinal parasites. The presence of E. coli uniquely develop's at temperature of approximately 43 °C (109 °F). As the dirty nappy has warm body fluids in it this in turn makes a cosy breading ground for bacteria. While most strains of E. coli are harmless, their presence is indicative of more serious fecal contamination, and hence a high possibility of more dangerous organisms."

She then said that we are handing her a game of russian roulett/ticking time bomb that she was not prepired to take and was sure that other parent/carers would not want to take that risk if they had the right information. Even though we (the Pre-School) informed the parents that disposal of nappies was down to them, we gave them no literature on what was in a soild nappy! or the bacteria it breeds or that we were transfering e coli!!!!!!

 

After looking this up i'm afraid that she is right!!!! If we hand back soild/dirty nappies it is possible to catch an unhealthy type of E.coli from someone else who has the infection. Spread may occur when parents of an infected child come into contact with soiled nappies, unless strict hygiene precautions are observed. We would then be liable.

 

You can purchase a medical bag for human body fluids and you can get them disopsed of or contact the local council as I did and here is there advice.

"Dispose of solid waste from nappies down the toilet and double bag them before putting in the wheeled bin."

 

Nappy changing may not be the most pleasant experience, but we do need to make sure that the soiled nappy is disposed of hygienically.

 

I hope I have helped!

 

KAT

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I had an arguement with our church over disposing nappies in the regular bins so I phoned the council and asked what I was supposed to do with nappies (the church tried to say nappies are clincal waste)

 

the council said childrens nappies can go in the normal domestic waste (double bagged) no need for special waste as these are not classed as clinical waste and if we needed an extra black bags to put them in we could have them

 

I dont know what different councils do but sometimes churchs, village halls and the early years dont always check the facts before moaning or giving out advice.

 

we use an extra bin in the disabled loo where we change nappies and empty at the end of session in the normal domestic rubish as there is only one or two we just hide them in the church bin so they cannt see the nappies and it seems to be doing the trick

 

if landlords complain about nappies in the outside bins ask them how they are accomodating children with disabilities under the DDA they have to, surely this means there should be provision to dispose of nappies?

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Oh, happy with all this so far, thanks everyone. Looks like we are doing it right - thank goodness for that! Didn't want the expense of clinical wastebin. I'll look out for one of Maz's wrappy things though!

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You can purchase a medical bag for human body fluids and you can get them disopsed of or contact the local council as I did and here is there advice.

"Dispose of solid waste from nappies down the toilet and double bag them before putting in the wheeled bin."

 

Nappy changing may not be the most pleasant experience, but we do need to make sure that the soiled nappy is disposed of hygienically.

 

 

So do you only put nappies into medical bag now at your setting? Where do you buy those from? Who collects them, or do you put them straight into wheely bin.

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Our chairperson looked into this quite deeply, we are a packaway in a village hall, according to the district council you can put one bin bag full of nappies out for normal collection once a week. Unfortunately for us we have to take the rubbish home daily as the hall will not allow us to use their bin store.....so parents currently take home nappies, not that there are many.....

 

Our development worker however feels that it is an infringment on childrens/parents human rights to make them take the nappies home......she can take them home then :o

 

 

i used to rent a church hall and without going into details the hall was 'advised' xD to use a commercial bin (environmental health visit ) ne place that you rent the premises off should have a commercial waste bin ... however if this does appen you might find your rent increases ... ha ho

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Guest babyjane31

If you have a commercial waste bin as we do it is in the contract that nappies are not to be placed in with normal waste, we therefore send ours home. However, we have an increasing number of children in nappies now and often change 7-10 a day so I am thinking it would be better to arrange proper disposal of them it will also look more professional then sendng them home, need to research costs now! We are a pre-school by the way, not sure anyone even attempts potty training anymore!

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oops never thought about sending nappies home or doing anything other than bagging them and putting them in the bin outside. We only would have about 3 a week so not a particular problem - don't think I would mention it to our hall committee though!

 

Jo

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We are the same as you Jo, we only change about 3-4 a week. We rent out the Village Hall (and we are their main income), and use their bins, after double bagging the nappies. It never occurred to us to send them home and luckily we have never had any problems with landlord etc.

 

However, having said that as of September we will probably have more nappies because we are having a lot more younger (2yr olds) starting. :o

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We have a contract with PHS for one nappy disposal bin and a sanitary disposal. We are also in a village hall and they only supplied a swing bin liner sanitary unit so I arranged my own. It is not very expensive, the cost for both units is only £49.50 per year and they are emptied once a month (apart from August when we are not there). I have included the link to their website.

 

PHS website

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You might catch a whiff when you put a nappy in but once the lid is on there is no smell and you can get deodourising fresheners to put inside. Now the lady who comes to collect the unit that is a different story - I could not do her job!!

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We have a contract with PHS for one nappy disposal bin and a sanitary disposal.

Fifty quid a year seems very reasonable - wonder how that compares with the cost of providing nappy sacks, cassets for the nappy disposal unit etc? presumably you bag the nappies before putting them in the bin though?

 

Something to think about!

 

Maz

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