Jump to content
Home
Forum
Join Us
Articles
About Us
Tapestry

Down's Syndrome child joining Preschool setting


 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi

 

Just after a bit of advice really... we are an open-plan packaway Preschool with around 20 children each morning: some 2 year olds, slightly more 3 year olds, (who will all be leaving us in July to go to the local school nursery).

 

After half term we are having a little girl join us who has Down's Syndrome. I have only met her once so far - she is a dinky little thing and I know Mum has some concerns about her getting knocked over etc.

 

I am meeting with her inclusion support worker next week as she wants to discuss the child with me - she thinks it will be an eye-opener!

 

I spent some time doing voluntary work with Down's children many years ago, and they were older, but other than that, I'm a little out of my depth. What things do I need to consider in terms of our provision? Mum has already mentioned that she likes to put things in her mouth, so we'll need to be careful about having small parts out (just at the time our older ones are starting to use these more in their play!). Any questions I need to ask of the inclusion support worker?

 

Thank you in advance!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Working with the parents/ carers is key with all our children, but essential in providing the right support in your provision for this little girl.

The types of questions I might ask are: do they have any other medical needs, do they speak, babble or sign. Their feeding styles, a visual time table etc. As they already have a support worker they should be able to give you lots of information and support too.

Your area Sen team and area Senco should also have additional resources if needed.

I would also ask about a one plan, one on one support if required as well as any additional funding too.

This reminds me of a wonderful little boy we had who was a absolute delight. He once got into our rather large water play tray and said bath.:)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you. I have had a brief chat with mum so far, but I think she's planning on spending the first couple of sessions (or more!) with us so she can be sure she's happy and confident to leave her. I am concerned that we have a couple of more 'spirited' boys and that whilst I don't think they'll particularly bother with this child, that their play can sometimes get a little out of hand and she may become caught in the crossfire! I am hoping for good weather for the last few weeks of term, meaning we can have our free-flow access to the garden, which spreads the children out more!

 

She doesn't have any other medical conditions, other than a small hole in the heart which apparently doesn't affect her at present, and she has some speech and uses a few signs, so mum thinks she'll be able to communicate ok for the most part.

 

I will ask about a one plan (not heard of one of those!) and will investigate further support and funding, although I won't hold my breath on that one...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Children with Down's Syndrome may have difficulties in different areas - there isn't one particular aspect of the child's learning and development that will always be affected by Down's. So you will need lots of information from the inclusion officer and parents to help you get to know the little girl and put support in place for her.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Early Support booklet is useful, link below:

 

http://www.downs-syndrome.org.uk/download-package/early-support-booklet/

 

Children with Down Syndrome are very prone to glue ear so check she's had a recent hearing test and bear in mind that glue ear will keep returning so regular hearing tests are important. Muscle tone can be low and this can impact on gross and fine motor skills as well as speech. Oral motor activities are useful (attached) and the Mr Tongue book (attached).

 

As you would with any other child, focus on her interests and find out her developmental level and plan for this. Also, make sure staff and other children don't "baby" her - it's very easy to do! Children with Down Syndrome are usually visual learners so use key signs and a visual timetable with photos or a first and then board (ideas attached).

 

If mum and the inclusion worker are staying for the initial sessions, they can model strategies for you. It would probably be a good idea to give her a few weeks to settle then your SENCO could organise a meeting with everyone involved. Don't be afraid to ask questions, no matter how silly they seem.

 

Most importantly - see the child first rather than the diagnosis! (See attached photo and quote)

 

 

 

 

Mouth Gymnastics.pdf

The_story_of_Mr_Tongue.pdf

Visual cues.pdf

post-3619-0-29334600-1431607448_thumb.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We have a little chap with downs syndrome with us at present and have had other children with this (and similar conditions) in the past. Every one has been very different.....just as every child is! The little one we have with us at present was not walking or talking when he joined us ...but is now doing really well and comes to us three full days a week. Like others have said because he is quite small we have had some issue with ensuring the other children know he is the same age . We have to ensure that sensory play is edible (playdough is low salt so he doesn't overdose...and we ensure it is throw away after session). We do Makaton as a setting so the children are used to us signing we haven't needed to put in visual timetables but have done visual routines (actually not up at the mo...another job to do!) He is number four out of five children four of which are boys...so he is a very typical boy and loves rough and tumble etc. I wouldn't be too worried about being bumped into too much how would you handle this with the other children? She's no more delicate !!! (one of my others could die if he gets bumped in to ...i worry about him much more! :o )

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you all for the advice and links etc.

 

Of course, I know she is an individual, and will be treated just like any other child in that respect! I am really looking forward to getting to know her, as from the little I've seen, she's a real character.

 

I will wait and see what the support worker says next week...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

Of course, I know she is an individual, and will be treated just like any other child in that respect! I am really looking forward to getting to know her, as from the little I've seen, she's a real character.

 

 

gosh sorry hope you dont think i was criticising...sorry if that came across the wrong way

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh no, Finleysmaid, not at all! I was worried you were all thinking I'm not looking at her as an individual, but rather as 'a Down's child', which isn't the case at all.

 

I have never experienced much in the way of additional needs in my career (goodness knows how!), so feel a little out of my depth and I'm worried that I'm not going to be able to do my best for her and make her Preschool experience the best it can be.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 months later...

we have been lucky enough (well that's the theory, though they didn't pay for advert, uniform, resources or the 5.6wks holiday that will now be incurred for that new person) to have been allocated inclusion funding for a child starting sept, can someone tell me if the person I've taken on can only be counted as 1:1 (though term not used any longer) or used in ratio to cover children if needed, obviously not another 7 but maybe the odd 1 or 2 when needs must ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

we have been lucky enough (well that's the theory, though they didn't pay for advert, uniform, resources or the 5.6wks holiday that will now be incurred for that new person) to have been allocated inclusion funding for a child starting sept, can someone tell me if the person I've taken on can only be counted as 1:1 (though term not used any longer) or used in ratio to cover children if needed, obviously not another 7 but maybe the odd 1 or 2 when needs must ?

well done for getting some funding!

I think I would be worried if their assistant was not working with others! in order to be inclusive they need to be working towards making themselves redundant!!!! in other words they need to ensure they are not velcroed to the child and are ensuring that the little one is playing with others as part of the group this therefore requires them to work with a group of children!

However I would also say that I do strongly feel to be inclusive there may also be times when they are working purely with this child on supporting them to develop their less developed skills(like speech for instance) but I would always keep pure 1-1 time to a minimum ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I totally agree Finleysmaid, I fully expect them to support as /when needed but not all the time, and not always the same staff member, but I can't find anything that says whether or not they can be counted in ratio towards other children or they have to be solely counted as 1:1 so that the child and 1 member of staff are totally separate to the required ratio..if you get my meaning :-/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

hmm now you've got me thinking mouseketeer. We've had inclusion funding for 5 this last term and 3 for the coming academic year. I never count them in ratios but the lady that does ours does work with other children, we have focus children that would benefit from similar group activities to the children with the funding... occasionally when we've had a staff member down we've 'cancelled' the 1:1 for that day and given the hours on another day.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I definitely won't be canceling anyone......and if my LA would like to question still claiming if the child was absent they might just get a bill for all the other incurred costs they don't cover,and you wouldn't not claim for if any of your funded children were absent :)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for comments, I don't think they had much option HiApreschool as the child has deferred school for a year and starting with us, and the EHCP already stated there would be full time support in school, though I still had to apply and it couldn't happen without it, when you bring into the equation other costs like advertising, DBS check, 5.6wks holiday pay, uniform, resources, training ( if we can find any) we are still subsidising this place the same as we do with all funded places ....It's just as well they know we all work on the 'what's best for the child' theory or we'd all be saying 'No thanks''

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. (Privacy Policy)