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Tapestry

Completes a simple program on a computer


Wildflowers
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I didn't realise that a computer programme is an 'age-appropriate'* game on a computer. (* another discussion...)

The child moves the cursor with the mouse to an image and clicks to achieve an intended outcome? If so, playing a game from the Internet should be the same thing (as it was programmed). And I assume that using a touch screen instead of a mouse should be OK.

Am I right that the learning is that one clicks on or touches things on a screen to make choices? (Learning to switch on and off could be done with a lamp.)

We can't have a laptop available for the children to use freely, so need to know of what I must ensure that the children have awareness.

Edited by Wildflowers
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Yet they updated they EYO for technology after tablets and apps began to be widely used.

Here is a definition of 'program' (which isn't 'programme', I just learned):

"A series of coded software instructions to control the operation of a computer or other machine."

So an app may be that. For sure children aged 30-50 months are not expected to do computer programming. Phew!

I wonder why children need to complete the game, if the EYO is about intentionally clicking or touching a picture on a screen.

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We haven't a computer of any description at playgroup and when asked last week about IT one of our moms said 'oh no, we're old fashioned, we play outside'. I thought it was lovely, turns out grandad has a farm and the children have ponies :)

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We meant to have a questionnaire for parents about this this year but never got around to it. We ask parents what their child can do on a computer or laptop/ tablet . To be honest the tech stuff in the EYFS is so out of touch as to make it laughable, but we must come from the thinking that a child does not have access to these items in the general run of things I think, then it makes more sense. Tablets are so easy for young children to operate compared to laptops and a mouse

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I have no idea how to assess children's skills as required (if required). We work with these two statements:

'Is aware of technology and its use in their environment' (younger) and 'Uses the technological opportunities they have for particular purposes when with their family' (older)

We assess these by talking about technology, gauging their awareness and use of it through what they say - how they expand on the topic. For the second one we may also ask their parents.

If a child has no access to ICT at home - technology other than a dishwasher etc, we bring a laptop to the setting.

With the above, we still haven't provided for the completing of a program. But the ELG can be covered without that, to my understanding.

I struggle with the use of early years technology, not the awareness, because I'm not sure what we specifically are supposed provide for and how to assess this.

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we also take in to consideration whether we think the children have the underpinning skills to use technology (as we'd far rather concentrate on their lack of communication!)

We figure as oldies, we were able to start using technology when it came in to our lives because we had certain skills (hand eye co-ordination, follow instructions, retain information I struggle with this but that's age! confidence to try) and not because we'd been exposed at the age of three

Technology moves on so fast we don't have the money to keep up with it at nursery so use parental questionnaires, chat about how the children use smartphones etc - and it's so funny when they do use the laptops to look at their pics and start swiping the screen!

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sorry Wildflowers - I'd listed them in the bit about us 'oldies' - hand eye co-ordination, follow instructions, retain information, willing to try...and understanding and experience of cause and effect, able to sequence etc

 

we figured that we didn't use computers until probably college age (some of my team not until their 50's) but managed to navigate them and so we looked at what enabled us to achieve this

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But those are skills covered in other areas. 'Knows how to use a mouse or to point at a screen to make selections and knows how to swipe a screen' perhaps? (Sorry for being difficult on a Monday morning at the end of term. And thanks for being helpful...)

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(Sorry for being difficult on a Monday morning at the end of term. And thanks for being helpful...)

noooo you're not being difficult - it's me!

Monday morning brain and reading it back I've not responded to your original question about completing a single programme but said vaguely and badly how we make a professional judgement about ICT overall if we don't actually see them doing it (we also err on the side of caution and mark them lower) - not helpful at all and not sure what I thought I'd read!

I think by programme, they mean game? but they don't want to say game as it would be too easy for us to understand and would imply playing and not learning!

Could you ask parents what computer games/apps they play at home and how much help they need to complete?

I'm in awe at watching some of them navigate an iPhone from unlocking to finding the app, choosing a level, replaying the level etc and then the completion of game!

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