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Action plan for ofsted Help


playgroup1
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Recent inspection identified weaknesses in some staff 's practice around demonstrating understanding of supporting learning, next steps, confidence,encouraging critical thinking, differentiating, providing challenge. They were there and observed for less than three hours. I know some staff (older members) are challenged by what they are being asked to do under Sir Michaels new regime and the new inspection but we are not as bad as the report makes out. Other aspects of the setting were praised ( working with parents, policies, procedures, safeguarding, supporting special needs, behaviour, staff being caring) so its not all bad.

But how do I show how we are going to tackle our shortcomings? I have to do an action plan, straight away, and turn things around in a year. The staff are totally demoralised, going from Good with elements of Outstanding four years ago, to Requires Improvement, even though we know we have improved and developed in lots of way since then.

Minimal input from LA. They are coping with lots of other settings in the same situation since the new inspection regime.

I just cant get past the action plan. There's no point saying we'll do anything we can't do , e.g. training courses because they are not available and dont really work for some of my staff.

Has anybody found themselves in a similar situation? Any help or advice gratefully sought?

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I haven't got anything to say personally about this but,sadly,this seems to becoming the general experience of quite a few settings recently.

I know of a few with similar outcomes to you, one went from outstanding to requires improvement and I know they are appealing due to the inspection .

I am sure someone will be along shortly with some good advice for you.

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Hi playgroup1

So sorry to read your post - scary stuff........

Think my action plan in this situation would mention Staff Supervisions, going back to basics - the planning cycle, developing a greater understanding of CoEL, 'closer' management moderation of staff's work......

Not sure if that's any help?

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All sounds good Sunnyday, could also introduce some peer observation, so members of staff that need to improve in certain areas could watch how members of staff who are strong in certain areas show good practice, maybe even pair stronger staff up with not so's to mentor them, hopefully the staff that need to improve practice recognise this or that could be harder :/ but interestingly I was reading through recent reports in my area this morning and staff/teaching inconsistencies was coming up a lot..good luck

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Can I play dense and ask how staff should show those things?

Like playgroup1 I think we do lots of things well but worry that we don't really fit into the vocabulary that Ofsted will use.

So some examples of how settings would say the they "support learning", shoe "differentiation" etc would really help explain it to all staff.

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HI we were told that the suggestions that Sunnyday and mouseketeer gave were definitely the way forward. At recent training run by Ofsted inspector we were told that everything has to be viewed in terms of impact. So what is the impact of the supervision, training course and the learning for children.

with the support learning stuff she said that we need to know what the starting point was, what we did and why, then analyse this to show what has been learnt. The impact and then the learning are what demonstrates how well you supported learning.

don't know if that helps!!!

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Thanks all.

My staff were really anxious before the inspection with the emphasis on teaching, and I thought I had reassured them that they were all teaching through everything they did with the children every day. Then Ofsted come along and basically say that they are useless, taking no account of the fact that none of my staff are qualified teachers and are definitely not recognised as such with what I can afford to pay them on what I get for FEEE. If my staff walk because they don't want all the pressure that the next year will bring (and it will if we are going to satisfy Ofsted that we have improved), then a good setting, valued by parents will close.

Don't think I want all this pressure either, along with everything else there is to do, with limited time and money.

Sorry, just needed to rant. Now to take a deep breath and carry on. Which is what we all do, isn't it.

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what we have done (and it is a pain) but we have basically put a section for impact on most things. So if we go on training we fill in a little table that says why we needed the training (e.g. are of weakness identified through SEF or CDP training) something on those lines and then what the impact to children's learning should be as a direct result of training, then we can at a later date say if this happened.

when I do my observations I get my staff to analyse the obs more the Ofsted woman said all she wanted to know really was what they knew before the obs what we did and why and what they have learnt with a large signpost (literally a sentence that say we will feed x, y, z, into planning as a result of this). She said she was seeing lovely obs with a detailed description of what the child did in the sand pit and she was not interested in that she was interested in what the child was learning by being in the sand pit. She also said it was good practice as a manger to regularly ask staff what are they learning? so that staff get used to thinking about it and answering so when Ofsted come in it wont be new to them. This helps with proving learning.

With the supervisions they have said the same they want to have a mention of what the impact for staff practice and therefore children's learning will be as a direct result of supervision (or peer assessment).

what she said to us (and believe me I know its a pain and jumping through hoops) but what she said to us was that loads of settings are actually doing what they should be doing but haven't got it written down in a way that backs it up and ticks Ofsted's box. Could you explain it like this to your staff its not about doing more its about drawing Ofsted's attention to what they are doing with the right language. They said to look at grade descriptors and make your paperwork and the language you use fit that language.

I have to say I am frustrated that we are expected to work around Ofsted and do all the bending and the work and they are not expected to have a brain and make the connection but I guess that is what we have to work with (which was what I was told when I voiced my opinion to the Ofsted inspector :ph34r: )

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When we had our registration visit, the lady said that she has no interest whatsoever in the observations and that as far as ofsted are concerned we need no written observations on children what so ever.

She said she will pick a child, observe them and then ask the member of staff in detail about what stage the child is at and she will only be happy if the member of staffs observations line up with hers... never mind she doesn't know the child.

Then she said when she comes for the next inspection she will ask to see the same child again if they are still there and then wants to know what an impact we have made on the child's development.

She will of course do that with a few children not just one.

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Playgroup1 you have my total sympathy - we too are battling with Ofsted - the goal post seems to change every time they visit - unfortunately we received an Inadequate after 2 good and now staff are totally demoralised - I feel that we are 'jumping through hoops' to keep Ofsted happy - they raise one point - we make changes and when they next visit they raise something else. Whilst I totally agree the emphasis should be on the children they seem to forget we are not teachers.

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Thanks Hopeytg

I haven't given copies of the reports to parents yet - waiting for new printer cartridges!

The few parents who I have discussed it with are horrified but there is nothing I can really say to them. "You must appeal" they say but don't understand that it doesn't work like that. The inspection was what it was - just that the staff and I didn't "perform" as we should have done on the day. Our local primary school , again highly regarded by parents, recently suffered a similar fate so now parents consider Ofsted as a complete joke.

Hopeytg - what response did you get from your parents?

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Hi if you really feel your inspection report is inaccurate, as well as knowing the inspector saw evidence of the actions you can challenge.

Inspectors are human too you know and we can all make mistakes.

For our inspections in the past it was more of the terminology within the report that was inaccurate and asked for it to be changed.

As for an action plan, we sat and took on board the actions highlighted and then set upon making a realistic plan for the changes and by whom.

Good luck with this. :)

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I have to say I am frustrated that we are expected to work around Ofsted and do all the bending and the work and they are not expected to have a brain and make the connection


This!! as well as being able to second guess what type of inspector we will have as well as knowing what their focus will be

Crystal ball anyone?




"Don't think I want all this pressure either, along with everything else there is to do, with limited time and money.


Sorry, just needed to rant. Now to take a deep breath and carry on. Which is what we all do, isn't it"



we were just chatting this morning about feeling demoralised (just through the expectations thrust upon us as well as a teacher who was visiting a child saying that it would be good to get structure in place when they come to school as they do MTP and assessments etc) and that it's really the first time we have felt this way (we have a lot of miles on our early years clock!) This sector is in a sad state of affairs at the moment and it can't be looking great on the gvmnt to have so many 'drops' in standards, statistically they are shooting themselves in the foot by nitpicking and changing goalposts


Take energy from your parents as they are the ones to judge you day in and day out and move forward because you know you do a good job, because they tell you you do (and their Lo's tell them you do!)


good advice from the others and yes, as Johanna1 says add an 'impact' column and celebrate the progress the children are making :-)
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This sector is in a sad state of affairs at the moment and it can't be looking great on the gvmnt to have so many 'drops' in standards, statistically they are shooting themselves in the foot by nitpicking and changing goalposts

 

Hmmm - don't get me started on my 'conspiracy theory' :ph34r:

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