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Risk assessment for hollow blocks


zigzag
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I am doing a risk asesment for our new community playthings hollow blocks. I have covered trapped fingers and toes, falling blocks and slipping on blocks. These are all the little bumps and happenings that we have had happen this week since taking delivery. Is their anything else I am missing and needs to go on it?? :huh:

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I would think about the transportation of blocks - our big blocks and long planks need two children to carry. Whilst smaller ones are only one.

 

And use - ours are used for building houses etc and for gross physical.

 

Also building - how high do you want them. They can be heavy if built really high.

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Ours slip on them. It depends on the soles of the footwear. The ramp blocks can be very slippery and we have had quite a few skids and slips.

We risk assess with the children as to what they are using them for, if they are making a boat by lying the blocks on the sides snd the ramps as the prow, for instance, with the planks over the top as seats, then we talk about making sure the plank is right over the block at both sides. This way, children learn how to risk assess, which we feel is the most important learning experience with the blocks.

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we had slipping issues with our second set of blocks - contacted CP to see if they had changed the varnish/oil because they did feel different. Lovely lady rang me back later after checking but nothing had changed in the production - twas just a weird thing! She suggested we increased our supervision (we were paranoid by them so were already supervising every move!)

Agree with Cait in getting them involved in checking how they lay then out

I envy those pics where you see them built really high and the children in the brochure are walking/climbing on them - can't bring ourselves to let them do that!

Watch out for trapped limbs! We've only had one (and yes, it was 'that' child who got in to everything!) - we had to unscrew the block to get the limb out!

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  • 2 weeks later...

Sorry a risk assessment for blocks!

I risk assess for climbing trees but not blocks

I have not lost the plot I promise!! If you have not seen these blocks they really are large and heavy. They aren't the usual small blocks!!

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I'm with Suer on this one - as we no longer have to have a written risk assessment for just about everything I think that if you can verbally justify that you have given sufficient consideration to the risks you are OK. We ask parents to ensure that our children wear closed toe trainer type shoes rather than crocs, jellies, flip flops etc. pointing out that we have large wooden blocks as part of our provision as well as other resources that if they landed on bare toe'd feet would hurt quite a bit, we staff at adequate levels and remind children about managing their risk and not carry the planks "a la Laurel and Hardy" style xD

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I totally agree and it is not my usual practice to write a risk assessment for a resource. But in the first week of having the blocks we seemed to have to filled out the accident sheets quite a lot, particularly for one certain child. I just felt I needed some form of written assessment should any queries be raised by parents.

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I totally agree and it is not my usual practice to write a risk assessment for a resource. But in the first week of having the blocks we seemed to have to filled out the accident sheets quite a lot, particularly for one certain child. I just felt I needed some form of written assessment should any queries be raised by parents.

although i am not one for extra paperwork i think i would be doing this too. There are some resources that risk assessment is good for just to ensure you and the staff have thought about all the consequences and that you are all singing from the same song sheet. I;m sure your staff are all terribly sensible (!) but just in case ;) we have a risk assessment for some resources like the climbing frames and tap-a-shape because it means we have a set of rules to follow in certain circumstances.

We've just had two new (and very heavy) cable drums that i've blagged these too need a risk assessment because they are much heavier than the old one so rolling them near a child is a big no-no!!!! :blink:

unfortunately although ofsted say we don't have to risk assess i suspect both our insurance company and riddor would expect us to have one in place...ofsted may be the only ones who inspect but they are not the only ones who have a influence on our practice.

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Totally agree with that finleysmaid. I think all too often we put Ofsted at the top of the list when thinking about things and we forget that their are other agencies that we also have to consider. (Mind you, I'm not sure Ofsted still exist. 5 years now and counting!!!)

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