Jump to content
Home
Forum
Join Us
Articles
About Us
Tapestry

Have I missed this?


Guest
 Share

Recommended Posts

Some local settings have shared some recent training where they have learned to provide baskets of resources specifically for boys and specifically for girls - they say the training says that boys want boys toys and girls want girls toys and therefore that is what we must provide by labelling and categorising as such - not necessarily saying one is for one gender only but at least labelling them ?

 

Sorry but I think this is bonkers but I am open to enlightenment ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

that is what we must provide by labelling and categorising as such - not necessarily saying one is for one gender only but at least labelling them

 

Sorry but I think this is bonkers but I am open to enlightenment ?

But isn't that what we already do.............. put things in boxes/containers/ etc and label them?

We do have boxes with what might be considered 'boys toys' - but anyone can use them, like wise with 'girlie' type things... it's all just stuff in boxes anyone can use! :blink:

Do they just mean things like builders belts filled with mark-making items?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes but these labels say "girls toys" "boys toys" the staff have decided which are which and categorised - one basket is pink and fluffy one has trucks and tools etc

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes but these labels say "girls toys" "boys toys" the staff have decided which are which and categorised - one basket is pink and fluffy one has trucks and tools etc

I think this is one of those ' smile sweetly, nod a lot'............then 'do your own thing' moments :D

We had an advisor in last week that told us that the 2 yr olds should be doing exactly the same routines as the 4yr olds (with regards to circle/story times)........... because they would be 'going to school eventually' so they might just as well get used to it now. :o

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That was my answer too - some settings have done this because of some half-ass training and they don't even believe in it, but you can't blame them for worrying about whether they have done things right and mistrusting their own judgements because they are worried about what Ofsted will think!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it's a good idea to check that there are things that appeal to both boys and girls (e.g. if one area is being used by mostly one gender) - considering if both genders have appealing opportunities to engage in experiences and activities (based on interests as we would do anyway). (ABC has done a blog on this). But I would say that our boys and girls play with all different types of resources and toys and putting certain items in boxes is only going to confuse their choice making?

Would we put all the pencils in pink pots based on the general findings that boys don't do as well and tend to be less interest in writing? (sorry probably taking it too far but who decides what is a girls or a boys toy?)

Green Hippo x

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's a campaign I read about on twitter which has already influenced how Debenhams, Marks and Spencer and Toys R Us label their toy areas. They have removed the girls/boys tag after the campaign highlighted a label prevents young children from choosing what they would like rather than what they feel they are supposed to like.

The campaign for those on twitter is #LetToysBeToys

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am strongly in the 'this is very bad advice' camp! By doing this they are narrowing children's choices and experiences which isn't what early years should be about. This really needs to be challenged.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest babyjane31

on some recent training I did there was an emphasis on the fact that some toys are more appealing to girls or boys and that we should be providing resources that support both gender's preferences. The message was that as settings we sometimes are better at providing resources that would generally be seen as girls toys, home corners, dressing up etc but shy away from boys role play choices such as super hero's, swords etc.

Maybe the information has been misunderstood as I can't imagine anyone suggesting we label toys in this way rather just ensure we have resources that match everyone's interests.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As I thought poppycock - I think the training has been misinterpreted - I have said I'm not sure that Ofsted will welcome their labels! ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think you're probably right GlamC ...this has possibly come from the sort of abc does thinking where he is asking us as practitioners to look at the provision for boys and girls...to ensure that they are enticing for both sexes.

Worrying what people think they hear in training and then put into practice isn't it!!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. (Privacy Policy)