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Dealing With Soiled Clothing


Deb
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Hi

 

We have a child who is constipated and on medication. Recently we have dealt with the child soiling himself, and the surrounding area. We've reassured the poor child, cleaned him up, cleaned the area up and put the soiled clothing, untouched, in a bag for the parent.

 

The parent has complained about pooh dropping out onto the floor when she opened the bag up. I don't think she is complaining about the clothing not being rinsed.

 

Should we try to remove as much excess as possible down the toilet before bagging up the soiled clothing? What do others do?

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We

If there is something solid we pop it down the loo (and wave bye!!!!! xD ) then everything else is double bagged and placed out of the way until home time! we never rinse...really feel this is not my job! :blink: :huh: :P

 

Agreed we do this....if the underwear is a total mess we bin it....never had a complaint yet!

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If there is something solid we pop it down the loo (and wave bye!!!!! xD ) then everything else is double bagged and placed out of the way until home time! we never rinse...really feel this is not my job! :blink: :huh: :P

 

Ditto :1b

 

Aren't people odd? My lovely grandson had real problems in this area when tiny - poor love was having to take both senna and lactolose for quite a long time.......I can't imagine that my son or daughter-in-law would ever have complained to anyone kind enough to deal with the accidents with such a caring attitude.......

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we've discussed this before??/ I always swish the solids down the loo, and rinse the pants in there too, then bag them up. sending home a bag full of poo is just horrid. Parents are always astonished that we do this, but it just seems part of the job to me.

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we've discussed this before??/ I always swish the solids down the loo, and rinse the pants in there too, then bag them up. sending home a bag full of poo is just horrid. Parents are always astonished that we do this, but it just seems part of the job to me.

 

Part of the job for me too I have never thought about not rinsing pants it just hasn't entered my head. Depending where the accident is if it is necessary to disinfect surrounding area then so be it. What on earth do people do when a child is sick down their clothing? Surely that doesn't go home in a bag untouched??? I am not suggesting we wash clothes in the true sense of the word but a good rinse so there are no solids left ( whichever end it is from!) and securely wrapped in a bag.

 

I daren't ask where bags of poo are kept all day - urgh!!!!!

Edited by Gezabel
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Thanks everyone for your replies, which have given me food for thought.

 

I think it's a question of time and resources not an unwillingness to deal with the unpleasantness. One day we had three members of staff dealing with one incident. One cleaning the playroom carpet and guarding the pile so that nobody stood in it. The other two trying to extricate a distressed child from his clothing with the minimum of mess on him, the floor and us (with all 3 other toilets in use so lots of coming and going), cleaning pooh stuck the length of his leg, cleaning the child's shoes, and trying to stop other children treading in the pooh on the toilet floor, bagging up the clothing so it didn't leave any more of a trail.

 

.. and looking after the other children of course. All in a day's work xD .

 

We'll discuss it at our staff meeting this afternoon but I think it's going to be difficult as the parent apparently said that this is childcare and it simply cannot happen again!

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we've discussed this before??/ I always swish the solids down the loo, and rinse the pants in there too, then bag them up. sending home a bag full of poo is just horrid. Parents are always astonished that we do this, but it just seems part of the job to me.

 

this is us - pants held onto as the toilet is flushed (would never rinse in a sink) - we've had the odd escapee/breakaway knicker :ph34r: and been apologetic to mum and at that point the parent has said don't bother, just bin.

 

we always ask when they start the potty training stage to establish preference - most say bin and they buy cheapies now and save the posh ones for when they are more 'toilet established'

 

I remember donkeys years ago a parent preferring them to be washed, which was fine...until she let slip if accidents occurred on a weekend they were binned - she 'would never wash them out - urghhh'!!!! :huh:

Edited by gingerbreadman
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As a practitioner I always flushed away as much as possible and rinsed if necessary and then bagged them up.....saw it as part of the job even if a little unpleasant at times.

 

As a parent I think I would be a little horrified if I was given back a bag of soiled clothes actually containing a lump of something that could have been flushed away after all you don't give back parents soiled nappies do you :(:o:ph34r:

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I think it's a question of time and resources not an unwillingness to deal with the unpleasantness. One day we had three members of staff dealing with one incident. One cleaning the playroom carpet and guarding the pile so that nobody stood in it. The other two trying to extricate a distressed child from his clothing with the minimum of mess on him, the floor and us (with all 3 other toilets in use so lots of coming and going), cleaning pooh stuck the length of his leg, cleaning the child's shoes, and trying to stop other children treading in the pooh on the toilet floor, bagging up the clothing so it didn't leave any more of a trail.

 

 

We have some child sized 'traffic cones' and all the children know that 'if the cones are around an area' it means that area is 'closed like shops are sometimes!' Depending on what's going on and staff etc they may temporarily be put around the water play area not due to any accident anywhere but just that for a brief time water play isn't available. We use the same system when there is an accident in the room. We had a child who was suddenly sick and the cooker in the home corner was covered! My priority is the child so one member of staff cones the area off (sometimes other children will say 'urgh XX has been sick quick go and get the cones") and one member of staff deals with the child. The 'soiled' area is immediately out of bounds - if it is possibly to deploy 2 or 3 staff to deal with the incident we would but that's not always the case. It isn't coned for any great length of time and we have never had an issue of other children going near the accident spot!

Sorry haven't explained it very well really - just like some settings have songs or music playing to signal snack or tidy up time -we have cones out means no go!!

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