Jump to content
Home
Forum
Join Us
Articles
About Us
Tapestry

Learning Stories - What Exactly Are They?


Guest
 Share

Recommended Posts

I keep hearing about learning stories and I'm keen to know more.

 

Please could someone tell me in very simple terms what they are, how they would differ from the profiles (books with photos, post its, etc.) that we already use, and how much staff time you would estimate they take to do.

 

I'm all for doing paperwork if it makes a genuine difference to children at our setting. However, I already feel staff spend too much time and give too much focus to what we call profiles (I know these are not end of foundation stage ones, but they do it in a very similar way to what you get in reception). The whole 'grab a camera he's meeting a learning goal' really worries me. Would learning stories be more of the same, or something much more meaningful and open ended?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can only give you my opinion.... doesn't mean I am right but I expect that a learning story, learning journey, profile with pics are all very similar!

 

We do our countys profile sheets........ highlight areas that have been achieved, date and wherte possible link to a photograph in the child's learning journey (a folder with empty polypockets just waiting for work, obs, photos etc)

 

The learning journey is the child's special book which is shared by them and with them and their parents.

 

Not sure if that helps or is enough info......

 

Am sure someone else will air their thoughts soon!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Someone showed me a sheet the other day entitled 'learning story', it was kind of a detailed observation linked to EYFS areas.

 

Could that just be a local version then?

 

From what people have said, I think what we call profiles would be very similar to what others call learning stories.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think they are the same things in effect, but my understanding is that the EYFS has something slightly more specific in mind. There is an example on the EYFS website which is a sheet with a place for a picture, and places to write your observation, the aspects it refers to, how the child was supported, and next steps (planning).

 

I used to use the sheets but the boxes were never the right size and I didn't want to hand-write in them.

 

Honey

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am a recpetion teacher and we have learning stories they are exactly the same as learning journeys ie: pictures, observations, childrens creations and post-its of what a child does in their child initiated play. (this is then looked at/ used as evidence during moderation)

 

I was also told that we sometimes can get trigger happy and go over board on post it's. This adviser said only write post-its ect.. for wow moments and things that you think are fantastic ect. their is no point writing a note about something they can already do just to tick all the objectives.

 

Emma

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This adviser said only write post-its ect.. for wow moments and things that you think are fantastic ect. their is no point writing a note about something they can already do just to tick all the objectives.

I agree with this, once you're certain that the child can do it reliably and spontaneously. We need to allow children to wallow in experiences so that they can practice and develop their skills, and we need to see some things more often than others!

 

Mind you, I worked with a practitioner who, having been observing child for a couple of years, still wrote "X picked up scissors with left hand" or "selected red pen when I asked him to". His handedness had been established many months before, and the need to collect evidence about his ability to recognise colours had long passed! :o

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not sure, but you could look at mine as an example here if you want. they do takle alot of time, but i feel its a lovely thing to do, and to share it with parents.

 

Publication3.pub

 

hope it helpsor gives you an idea

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not sure, but you could look at mine as an example here if you want. they do takle alot of time, but i feel its a lovely thing to do, and to share it with parents.

 

Publication3.pub

 

hope it helpsor gives you an idea

Hi popcorn

I couldn't resist having a look........although I'm not thinking of changing my method........it's really lovely! :o

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I leave a space available for parents bit. OME ADD TO IT SOME PREFER NOTTOO. bUT KNOW WITH THIS PARTICULAR PARENTS WILL BE DELIGHTED AND WILL LEAVE COMMENT.

 

i HAVE DONE A FEW AND THEY DO TAKE TIME, BUT THE MORE PRACTICE IVE BECOME MUCH QUICKER AT IT.

 

lOVE eARLY YEARS PRACTICE

 

XX

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry, I wasn't clear. I can see the space where the parents' comments go, I wondered whether they get written in by hand by the parents afterwards? Then I saw 'video evidence included' and got confused and thought it might be stored electronically. Not that it takes much these days to confuse me! :o

 

Having read it again, I see it says at the bottom that it is printed. What are the pages stored in?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Although we do all use different terms to mea the same thing, I do interpret learning stories differently from learning journal/diary.

 

To me, a learning story is more narrative, and would form part of a learning journal rather than being the journal itself..a bit like a chapter being part of a book.

 

learning stories would usually take place over a longer period of time than a wow sticker and are more in depth than the 'Johnny put on his coat' type. Some settings set them up so that different members of staff contribute to a story as chidlren move from place to place in the room, and focus on different children each day/week. They are particularly useful if you are using Leuven well being and Involvement scales in any way, as I dont feel you can really use those in a snapshot type observation.

 

I liked a learning story approach when I was stil teaching, although it was hard to manage with a 13:1 ratio, but I felt I really got to know the children much better, really know them and i know I observed things I wouldnt have if I hadnt considered that approach. I did find them time consuming, but did them less often, but learned more from them.

 

If you want to read more, Margaret Carr's 'Assessment in Early hildhood Settings' is worth a read.

 

At the end of the day, unless you are unhappy with what you are currently doing, then I probabaly wouldnt change it if you have other priorities, but if you dont feel that what you do now is 'quite right' then its worth a team discussion on the benfits or otherwise of different systems.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi there Happymaz,

 

Sorry was in amad rush before. Yeah the parents hand write along the dotted lines and return it to me where I add it to the General book all about the named child. If parents want a personal copy, i print one off for them. But they are generally happy tgo have it the childs personal book, as these are accessable to parents any time anyway.

 

As for the video evidence, i just put that as note so i rember. it was definaetly worth videoing today, and thank goodness the rechargable batteries were charged. doesnt happen often in our setting. E USUALLY START VIDEOING AND then the memory cards is too full, or batteries dead ha ha. very frustrating. but today was a very good day.

 

any questions or other examples just let me know. I usually use page borders from communicatio4all. kust to pretty it up really. will find others for you but they are from sparklebox border pgs not sure i can upload it with s'box. Will seee wgat i can do.

 

xxx

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

The files seem to be publisher files which you need to have to open them. Popcorn might be able to save them as a doc or a pdf possibly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. (Privacy Policy)