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Review Of Eyfs Ordered


eyfs1966
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aaarrrggghh......there is talk of it being too prescriptive and they want less bureacracy also they are questioning whether children should be assessed more formally at this age....It is is the samey same I just worry that they will tweak it tooo much and we will be left unsettled again....I hope that they build on what in my opinion is working well....I like how we have things working and am all up for increasing qualifications...I hope they dont dumb it all down too much.....it is annoying that we have to all hold our breath again and prepare for more change...again.....possibly ....uncertainty.... :o

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I'd like to see them keep the same basic format, but slim it down and lessen the requirements to provide evidence for everything. I want to see practitioners allowed to focus on playing with the children rather than recording that same play. The time you spend on writing stuff down would be far better spent on doing more of that stuff, i.e. playing with the children.

 

I'd also like to see a slimming down of what committees are required to do. I'd like a recognition of the different challenges facing voluntary run settings as opposed to private ones.

 

We can dream!

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Guest jenpercy
I'd like to see them keep the same basic format, but slim it down and lessen the requirements to provide evidence for everything. I want to see practitioners allowed to focus on playing with the children rather than recording that same play. The time you spend on writing stuff down would be far better spent on doing more of that stuff, i.e. playing with the children.

 

I'd also like to see a slimming down of what committees are required to do. I'd like a recognition of the different challenges facing voluntary run settings as opposed to private ones.

 

We can dream!

 

Is that stuff down to EYFS or just OFSTED. I would like to see more recognition of the fact that after-school clubs are totally different. I'd also like to see less of the here's how to achieve excellence - an an acre of land to take children out to grow their own veg. Oh wait - I suppose that is the sort of thing you mean. It's just totally different for a 4 hours a day packaway setting isn't it?

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Sarah Teather, the Childrens' Minister was interviewed on radio 4's Womans Hour this morning about (in part at least) what they are considering with regard to the EYFS. You can find it here (it starts about 25 minutes into the program). :o

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I've never listened to Woman's Hour before. Is it just me or was the interviewer a bit antagonistic, with a focus more on budgets than actual changes and action plans for the EYFS?

 

Regards

Mark

http://earlychildcare.wordpress.com

 

Sarah Teather, the Childrens' Minister was interviewed on radio 4's Womans Hour this morning about (in part at least) what they are considering with regard to the EYFS. You can find it here (it starts about 25 minutes into the program. :o
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Guest jenpercy
Can they actually ask us what we think/need?

xD

 

 

Hope you get my meaning :o

 

i think consultation was mentioned but perhaps we should let them know anyway. Starting new thread

 

How would YOU modify the EYFS

 

(Apparently the Daycare Trust says that 70% of settings think the EYFS is good for children - or an improvment, or some such

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PPP - you might be surprised at the people who read discussions on the FSF, so it's worth making views known here. xD

 

However, for those who have suggestions, can I gently remind them that the best way to make your views and opinions accessible to others is to do so in an accessible way. Traditionally the FSF community has been really good at doing that by adopting certain principles, eg:

 

* Don't do it as a rant. Rants are for people who don't really expect to be listened to and just want to let off steam.

* If you have a criticism, articulate it clearly, with examples where possible. Don't be afraid to say where things are going well!

* Make suggestions for realistic ways to address problems.

* There are two sides to most arguments and becoming hostile to those who don't immediately take your view only demonstrates that your own position is not as strong as it could be...

* Don't resort to building a bogeyman to attack. Eg phrases like "The powers that be..." can only serve to start building trenches where bridges would be far more constructive.

 

Most of you know all this stuff anyway and do it every day so I shouldn't try to teach all my grandmothers to suck eggs. But we have a reputation for being able to have very active conversations with different views expressed without anyone once hurling a custard pie, so it might be worth mentioning again here... :o

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My own view is that the content of the EYFS worked well in my setting, and as a staff team, we designed our own methods of observation, recording, assessment and planning that allowed us to gain an outstanding Ofsted report, yet was not onerous in terms of paperwork. I liked having that autonomy to set up those systems which suited our staff, children, parents and budget. I have never felt that the paperwork was an issue at all.

 

However, I do have concerns about the relationship between the requirements of the EYFS and the demands of Ofsted, and have often felt that the two are vastly separate. I'm really hoping that the review will go some way to reducing this gap, and will make clearer to practitioners the actual requirements they will be judged on.

 

I'm also hoping that the EYPS and staff development and training will be supported further. High quality provision goes hand in hand with high quality, well trained staff. :o

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What I do hope it means is that you are not all in for yet another big change... having implemented so many different things in early years over the last 20 years it became a bit demoralising to have every inspection under a different set of criteria.. I never had 2 inspections under the same set of 'rules' , by the time we were due they had all changed...

 

EYFS for me was a positive step.. gave us the chance to overhaul everything, reduce the paperwork and planning, concentrate on the children and their needs... I left just after managing to get the EYFS fully implemented in the setting.. took a long time to change ideas from topics to child led, but once done the staff really enjoyed just being able to change things and 'go with the flow' which is what it allowed .

 

Some of the issues we had were with the wording and different interpretations we got when ringing Ofsted for advice.. Staff ratios and staffing being a particular area which needs clarifying better. As we know we can get 2 different answers to the same question when asked , depending on who you talk to.

Staffing qualifications being another area.. very unhelpful at times with wording which can be interpreted differently.

 

I do also feel that while the training and qualifications need supporting.. it need or should not be to the detriment of those practitioners who have worked in the area for many years and are extremely good at their job, keeping up with all the changes -they too need some form of recognition... not assume because they don't have the 'bit of paper' are unable to do as well.

 

Inge

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well hopefully, they look at the whole ofsted inspection as well. it seems more about using the right words rather than the acutal work done.

 

I hope that children are allowed to develop on their own terms without having lables attached to them.

 

Boys failing bec they reach the goals - whenthe goals are unrealistic.

 

We have had speech and language theapists saying that the expectaions are very unreallistic and this is why more children are being refered to their service when all the children needed was less assessment.

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I actually like the EYFS, it has never been a tick box in our setting

 

We have to used child intiated nearly always and worked it into the eyfs

 

We have worked WITH children, especially working outside and in the forest and have seen the data for girls and especially boys soar

 

hand on heart this end of term reports for our children going to school has shown that all( by the exception of 2 boys) have reached the elg's

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Guest jenpercy

Well, actually, I can say for the EYFS - that it has led us to evaluate how well the staff know the children - as well asmaking sure that everything is child-led. In that it is benefitting our older children as well. What i don't like is having to keep records on individual children and the observations. HOWEVER, I am currently using observations as a staff learning tool, to try to see if they can understand the play process, and get to know something about individual children. It's a slow process though........

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We have embraced the EYFS, we have always followed the childrens interests but find the variations of the requirements by Ofsted vary with each inspector, its at this point that the trouble starts. Surely they could all be looking and interpreting the same thing. Now if they had a tick list , copies for us too, we all understood the criteria. There would be written evidence by the inspector as to what was good and what was deficient, worrying deficiencies could be pointed out on the day and if not rectified immediately could be marked down. Positives could be rewarded by staff being told at the same time. If the inspectors knew that they would be returning to establishments to make sure that their reccomendations would make one or two think before they made cavalier and innacurate statements

 

I find that all my older, more mature staff , can recall many details of each childs understanding and overall development, without putting pen to paper whereas the younger one brought up in the written/ evidence based/ record era, forget who they are writing about at the end of a nine hour day.

 

Have to close now, we are celebrating the nurseries 31st birthday with an all day Teddy Bears Picnic and the fun is about to start again. We have nearly 35 children in today including six babies and everyone brought a teddy, so if we, the adults can keep going until 5-30pm, we will have had a good day.

 

Best wishes to everyone

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I notice that this all seems to focus on "pre school" and my concern would be that the current political climate would once again put reception into the "they must be learning "lessons" because they are in school" camp.

 

For all it's faults the EYFS gives us a common language and understanding, clear expectations (and personally I don't think the ELGs are unobtainable - most children do achieve them every year in increasing percentages) and a principled approach to pedagogy.

 

In my estimation this is no bad thing.

 

Cx

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I notice that this all seems to focus on "pre school" and my concern would be that the current political climate would once again put reception into the "they must be learning "lessons" because they are in school" camp.

 

For all it's faults the EYFS gives us a common language and understanding, clear expectations (and personally I don't think the ELGs are unobtainable - most children do achieve them every year in increasing percentages) and a principled approach to pedagogy.

 

In my estimation this is no bad thing.

 

Cx

 

I couldn't agree more! This is exactly my thinking! x

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I notice that this all seems to focus on "pre school" and my concern would be that the current political climate would once again put reception into the "they must be learning "lessons" because they are in school" camp.

 

For all it's faults the EYFS gives us a common language and understanding, clear expectations (and personally I don't think the ELGs are unobtainable - most children do achieve them every year in increasing percentages) and a principled approach to pedagogy.

 

In my estimation this is no bad thing.

 

Cx

 

 

I heartily agree, Catma! It gave us a real sense that we were singing from the same hymn sheet. I know in the past we've said to parents "The Foundation Stage is up until the end of Reception" but I don't think that pre- EYFS it was so obvious - I know it was there, but in some schools it maybe wasn't so strongly adhered to?

 

I, for one, have enjoyed the freedom EYFS has given me - it's been a real feeling of 'going back to the old days' of much more play with the children and a feeling of excitement at the start of the week of 'where will they take me this week?'

 

I had a phonecall from the school library service last week asking me what themed book pack I would like for September, as apparently I've 'not used the service for a long time'. I said that I couldn't book a pack as I didn't know what I'd be doing in September yet, and the nice lady said "Oh, have you not decided your topics yet?" 'well, no, we haven't done pre-planned topics for almost 2 years now' and she was flabbergasted! So EYFS obviously hasn't had time to fully 'bed down' in some quarters, so it's only fair they give it a fighting chance!

 

I wonder, if they did a poll of who likes it and who doesn't, whether the result would surprise them!

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Hi everyone,

 

 

I am also in agreement with Cait - I too enjoy the EYFS. It has given me the opportunity to allow the children to do what they are good at and that is PLAY!!!!

 

I always used to feel that I had to justify the children playing and explain why they did not have anything to show for their time with me (For parents), but now it is more natural to allow the children to take part in what they enjoy.

 

I also feel that the EYFS has enabled all children to have more control over what they are doing and we can feel confident in letting them do that.

 

I love the fact there are no themes or topics or us saying "Right this week we can learn about......."

 

Instead we can have a week that starts as a child turning a play house into a castle and being a princess to the end of the week it becomes an Ice-cream parlour!!!!!!! Where they are selling ice-creams and lollies through a door! It is great and I love it!!

 

 

Do you think that is a passionate enough response for them?????

 

x

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hand on heart this end of term reports for our children going to school has shown that all( by the exception of 2 boys) have reached the elg's

 

Do you mind me asking when you say this do you mean that they have achieved the ELG's?

We have 20 children leaving to go to school and whilst some of those have made fantastic progess in the last couple of years we have one child who has actually achieved all the ELG's. This child has been identified as being gifted and has had an IEP for a while. The school she is going to have carried out their own 'assessment' and she has been put on their programme for gifted children. For the majority of our pre-school leavers, though sound progress has been made no other children have fully completed the ELG's but as the expectation is that these should be achieved by the end of reception I was not concerned and thought that generally speaking our children had progressed well in all areas of learning whilst with us.

 

Are there lots of other preschool settings out there with children who have achieved the ELG's prior to going to school?

 

Apologies if I have misunderstood your 'reached the ELG's'

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The main problem with EYFS is that it is 'delivered' via so many different types of settings and therefore means different things to different people - where is the moderation between these different providers?

 

Teachers end up having to fill in the very prescriptive eprofile, no-one else who has had prior input - what a hoot!

 

For example, if you follow letters and sounds then SOME children, those who can easily 'rote learn' can do well on the higher points, but may not get rhyme and alliteration - which is in the 1 to 3 section. If they don't 'get' that, then, officially, they can't have the others!

 

There is too much variance within the EYFS - eprofile versus ages and stages etc - clear it up please! That's what I want to see.

 

 

Jenni

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Do you mind me asking when you say this do you mean that they have achieved the ELG's?

We have 20 children leaving to go to school and whilst some of those have made fantastic progess in the last couple of years we have one child who has actually achieved all the ELG's. This child has been identified as being gifted and has had an IEP for a while. The school she is going to have carried out their own 'assessment' and she has been put on their programme for gifted children. For the majority of our pre-school leavers, though sound progress has been made no other children have fully completed the ELG's but as the expectation is that these should be achieved by the end of reception I was not concerned and thought that generally speaking our children had progressed well in all areas of learning whilst with us.

 

Are there lots of other preschool settings out there with children who have achieved the ELG's prior to going to school?

 

Apologies if I have misunderstood your 'reached the ELG's'

 

I took this to mean that the children had got as far as the ELGs ie had attained the first 3 points on the profile.

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Guest jenpercy
The main problem with EYFS is that it is 'delivered' via so many different types of settings and therefore means different things to different people - where is the moderation between these different providers?

 

Teachers end up having to fill in the very prescriptive eprofile, no-one else who has had prior input - what a hoot!

 

For example, if you follow letters and sounds then SOME children, those who can easily 'rote learn' can do well on the higher points, but may not get rhyme and alliteration - which is in the 1 to 3 section. If they don't 'get' that, then, officially, they can't have the others!

 

There is too much variance within the EYFS - eprofile versus ages and stages etc - clear it up please! That's what I want to see.

 

 

Jenni

 

Anyone else find that they just don't get the levels that some childre have been supposed to have reached in other settings.

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There are potentially several reasons for this, aren't there? Children can display differing levels of ability and interests within a setting, let alone across settings :o We found this several times where children's speech and language was detected by one or more members of staff as being something to watch out for, when other members of staff were witnessing high levels of interaction from those same children. I think as long as you can back up your assessments with clear observational evidence you have to accept variations from time to time.

 

Of course staff training is so important here too, isn't it? Making sure all staff know how to observe and assess, and that some sort of moderation takes place in the setting will really help to make sure assessments are consistent.

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Hello there,

Haven't written anything on this site for quite some while; but feel compelled to do so on this topic!

 

I too have been pondering 'moderation' within the setting and between settings. Having talked with the local reception class teacher I have found out that there are some quite large discrepencies between keyperson judgements and observations on children attending more than one setting as well as our own variancies for children within the one setting.

 

As a team, we do share our observations and interpretations of the EYFS practice guidance (especially the Development Matters and Look Listen & Note sections) so as to find a 'best fit' but it can raise some serious issues and debate, such as the context of the observation and therefore stage of development and next steps.

 

I feel all we can do is our best, but hope that I am giving to the children credit where it is due.

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