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What Are You Reading Now?


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I was just wondering what people are reading at the moment. I tend to have several books on the go, with little time to finish them, but I thought it would be fun to share ideas and a brief comment on the book. Books don't have to be work related, although I am probably a sad person, as my list are all work related books! (I could do with some other recommendations though - some fiction would be nice for a change!)

 

Here are mine:

 

Raising an Emotionally Intelligent Child - John Gottman

This is an easy read, and although it is written for parents, I think it's equally as valuable for those working with children. In fact, I think it should be a 'must read' for students! Gottman talks about four styles of dealing with children's emotions, and how damaging three of them can be. The frightening thing is, that amongst the damaging styles is one that many of us might not even recognise as an issue, until we really thought about it. He gives questions to identify your own style, which are a useful starting point, although I found they could give an inaccurate 'reading' as they are too open to interpretation. However, honesty about yourself along with answering the questions gave me great insight into what I do well, and what I need to think about in future.

 

He talks about how to become an 'emotion coach' to children, ie how to help them to learn to manage their emotions, rather than you manage situations for them. A real eye-opener, and well worth a read!

 

Raising Lifelong Learners - Lucly Calkins

I'm only a little way into this one, but I love it so far! She talks of the foundations of literacy and the art of conversation, eg the dangers of 'fill in the blank' talk with children.

 

It's a really easy read, again written for parents, but equally useful for practitioners. I love the style, with quotes like "When I read aloud to my children my goal is to snuggle around the warm glow of a story"

 

So, what books are other people reading? I've got another load on order, so I really need to finish these, but I'm always on the lookout for recommendations!

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Hi, Last night I finished reading The Lord of the Rings. It is SO different from the film, and I'm glad that I finally got round to reading it again, especially before term starts again. Now I'll be back to reading work realated ooks.I'm toying with the idea of taking the City and Guilds 7402 (the old 7307) to tutor adults, and I've got some books to start that relate to that. The book that I've got on the 'go' mostly though is Achieving QTS Teaching Foundation Stage. It's aimed at trainee and newly qualified teachers but gives good advice and ideas to all in the FS. During the holiday I also read The curious incident of the dog in the night time, what a brilliant book. :)

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I'm reading Ben Eltons 'High Society'. Can't tell you if it's any good yet but I usually enjoy his novels. Generally I'm a bit of a fantasy/science fiction reader with Terry Pratchett being an all time favourite in our house. :)

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I've just finished 'Life of Pi' by Yann Martel about a boy who grows up in a zoo with his family and then eventually ends up on a boat with a tiger ! I couldn't put it down, it was funny, scary and raises some really interesting ideas about zoos. I tend to overload on fiction in the Summer as well as some inspirational new Early Years books to get me excited for the new term. I've just read and re-read 'The thinking child' (as suggested on here) and have found it so useful to reflect on creating a really stimulating environment for the children. I should fit some more fiction in to term time too but I get a bit carried away with work reading !

Enjoy the new term everyone ! :o

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I've been on holiday, so I've had a chance to read 2 books in the past 2 weeks.

The first one is: The Curious Incident of the dog in the night time It was a fantastic read. I cannot reccommend it highly enough. I found it insightful, well written, funny, it touches your heart and has plenty of twists and turns. It also gives you an insight into the mind of a child with Asbergers, all his little querks and things that he can and can't deal with. A fantastic read.

 

The other I've not quite finished- about a chapter or 2 to go. It's by Andrew Collins and is called 'Where did it all go right? - Growing up in the 1970's' As a child of the 1980s (sorry!) I wondered when I started reading it if I would be able to make links with what he is writing about. I certainly could and found it very funny. The book is a mixture of him writing about his childhood and extracts from his diaries throughout the years, which show you just what the child then teen was thinking. Another good read and I plan to read the sequal after I've finished off this one.

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I've read about 10 books in the last few weeks among them Anthony Trollope, "The way we live now" followed by Joanna Trollope, "Marrying the mistress". Both great in their own way! And "Star of the Sea" by Joseph O'Connor, the story of several characters on board a ship escaping the potato famine in Ireland and seeking a new life in America. Fantastic characterisation and atmosphere.

 

I love the summer, when I can get down to the Library and read all sorts of things that I wouldn't regularly read or buy. I find the new stock shelf a world of exciting literature!!

 

Cx

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I read "The curious incident of the dog in the night" during the Whit half term holiday. I have to say it was amazing and I read almost through the night to finish it. It also made me realise that I have my own little idiosyncracies. The character in the book likes prime numbers but I don't. Once I get past 5 I don't like numbers that aren't divisible by any other. In fact I really don't like odd numbers at all. One of my staff has to have matching coloured pegs on each item of clothing when she puts her washing out! Makes you think! How many of you out there have your little foibles??

I have just finished reading the Phillip Pullman trilogy "His Dark Materials". I found them very strange and thought provoking.

Linda

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Hi!

 

Lord of the Rings - of course!! Read it at least once every year, since I was 11.

 

Boought 'Dog in the Night time' the week it was published and have been trying to convert the world ever since- glad to see you've found it.

 

A good book, by a local author, is "Tha Last Girl", but can't remember author's name! My daughter has borrowed it, will post again when I get the name . Also "The Twins" by Tessa de Loos - about twins who are separated in childhood and grow up in Holland and Germany, during the second world war. Some interesting insights and perspectives. "Junk" by Melvyn Burgess - a really easy read about drugs and the experiences of some very accessible characters!

 

Sorry, I have been treating myself to some leisure reading!

 

Sue :D

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Hey Sue

 

My husband's just finished reading 'Junk' and enjoyed it but he couldn't believe it was a children's book! I've read one of the Gervase Phinn books - can't remember the name now as they all sound the same! and Phillipa Gregory - The Queen's Fool - historical fiction set in Elizabethan Times. Now I'm off to start the K-Pax trilogy....

 

Denise

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I have to read fiction especially in term time or I cant sleep! Dont usually remember much about what I've read though! :o

I've several "work" based books that I keep dipping into and also "protecting the Gift" that Nicola recommended before and a couple of Steve Biddulph books by the bed alongside some fiction. But the book I remember most I read in February and was Lesley Pearce's "Remember me".

Another that I had to put down as I just couldnt cope with it was "Lovely Bones" by Alice Seagrove(?). Anyone else any thoughts on that one?

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Lovely Bones What an amazing book. My husband and I were reading it at the same time. WE both thought it was great, although the beginning was a bit traumatic for me.

 

I'm just reading 'Angry Housewives eating bon bons at the moment' Not especially 'Intellectual', but a good yarn nevertheless. I'm going to try and finish it tonight.

 

I think I must be the only person who did not like the Curious dog book. I really hated it!, but then I hate Shakespeare too!!!!!

 

 

Happy reading chaps

Kate :o

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I picked up a copy of the Curious Incident as soon as it came out, read it in 2 days.

Recently have read the latest Gervase Phinn, have read them all and passed them around at work!!!!

I am starting "Help, I'm a Teacher Get Me out of Here!"

I thought I would love it, but having picked it to read on holiday, I have hardly picked it up at all!!!!

I think I will have to start it again to form a proper opinion!!

Maybe Monday night after having done a day Team Building!!! at our local outward bound centre!!!!

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So glad you have found ' The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time.' My daughter is on the autisitc spectrum and it is just a breath of fresh air to me to read a book which has so much insight. Another in this vain, but non-fiction is 'The Martian in the Playground'. My daughter is 31, and over the years I have had many reactions which have made me feel very sad, and these books have helped me no end. I would like everyone to read them.

Lord of the Rings- Ah, sigh, on my desert island I would take that book.

This summer I read lots of books amongst which I enjoyed Bill Brysons book 'This Small Island' LAUGH!!! Also, Pompeii, Holy Fools, and serious stuff, Threads of Thinking by Kathy Nutbrown which I would recommend to anyone working with young children..

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Recently have read the latest Gervase Phinn, have read them all and passed them around at work!!!!

I've read all of these and found them all great. My boyfriend's mum now has them (she's a teacher too). I guess I have close links as I come from Yorkshire and know the kinds of schools he visited, but all the same, a great read.

My very first INSET day was with Gervase Phinn about writing. He talked lke he writes his books, full of funny tales and things that kids say. He even signed my book for me!

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I also read the Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night and have to agree that it is a very good book! it also seems to appeal to a wide range of people - my boyfriend picked it up and enjoyed it so much that he handed it on to his mum, and now it's in the hands of my mum...it will definately be a well thumbed book! :o

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Annette, as everyone is raving on about it...perhaps I could borrow it too?!! When you get it back and we see each other at some INSET or other?!!!

 

My reading this summer extends to the Patricia Gaffney triology of novels, which were easy reading, my favourite (and weirdly the saddest) was 'The Saving Graces' I also ahem...admit to reading lots of the Featherstone 'little books' (!!)

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I've just picked up the most wonderful book called 'watching the English' by Kate Fox. Its all about the rather peculiar nature of English culture, and having lived in Africa for many years, but being back here on leave, its all so true.

 

She devotes a whole chapter to the English obsession with the weather, and another to how hopeless we are at introductions. I havent read the rest yet, but I have trouble putting it down.

 

It's had me laughing at every page. :D

 

I must be really sad. (oh and she devotes a whole chapter to that too :o )

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Bought "The Lovely Bones" this morning on the strength of mention here - Oh, dear, read first three chapters on the bus home. I can see this is going to be one of those books i can't put down, even though I don't really want to read it!

 

Thanks Susan

 

Sue :D

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Must get my hands on that, Jenny! I love that sort of book. Anyone read "Eats Shoots and Leaves" by Lynne Truss ?

 

Note, I didn't try to put the apostrophe in there!! :o

 

Sue :D

I've read it!

Took me a while to read it, as bits were interesting and fun, but then at times it trailed off and was a bit too technical for me, and I'm easily bored!

However it was an interesting and fun read on the whole, especially as the author has a thing for Opal Fruits and how wrong it is that they are now called Starbursts!

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Susan,

At the hairdresser's today (very nice, thank you, much shorter and two-toned, now!!) I got myself in the potentially embarrassing situation of sitting with tin foil in my hair, quietly sobbing my socks off over 'Lovely Bones'. Was only saved by being in the corner :o I don't know whether I'm going to be able to finish it, but it is really excellently written!

 

Sue xD

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