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We are planting seeds, beans etc over the next few weeks and would like to sort different beans and make patterns etc. Are there any beans that children shouldn't handle?

 

I'm sure someone will be able to advise me.

 

Thanks

 

V

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kidney beans springs to mind

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dried soya beans are also dangerous as contain a toxin

Edited by blondie

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So that's dried soya beans and kidney beans not to use. What do you advise or do you think I should not go with beans of any kind?

 

V

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We have two children with G6PD deficiency and can't handle broad beans.

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We have two children with G6PD deficiency and can't handle broad beans.

having not come across this (I assume they are siblings??) I looked it up ...blimey I don't think there's a bean missing off that list! although to be fair it is only if they ingest it I think

 

I think beans and lentils in general are not great if they've been dried but only if you have children who are likely to eat a few I'm pretty sure handling them isn't unsafe (for those without G6PD!)

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Found this

 

 

 

Raw Kidney Beans

I read that kidney beans are harmful when eaten raw. Several day care and nursery schools have dry beans (different varieties) out for kids to play with. What danger would there be if a child ate a few of these raw beans?

Answer - Red Kidney Bean Poisoning is an illness caused by a toxic agent, Phytohaemagglutnin (Kidney Bean Lectin). Different types of lectins are found in many species of beans, but are highest in concentration in red kidney beans. The unit of toxin measure is the hemagglutinating unit (hau). Raw kidney beans contain from 20,000 to 70,000 hau, while fully cooked beans contain from 200 to 400 hau. White kidney beans, another variety of Phaseolus vulgaris, contain about one-third the amount of toxin as the red variety; broad beans (Vicia faba) contain 5 to 10% the amount that red kidney beans contain.

As few as 4 or 5 kidney beans can bring on symptoms within 1 to 3 hours. Symptoms include extreme nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. Some persons have been hospitalized, but recovery usually occurs about 3 - 4 hours after symptoms appear.

Lectins are inactivated with cooking so fully cooked or canned kidney beans are safe to eat. Undercooking may actually increase lectin activity and increase the hazard. This could be a problem when using slow cookers (crock-pots) if time/temperature conditions are not adequate to fully cook the beans. Therefore, when kidney beans are called for in slow cooker recipes, make sure they become fully tender, or use pre-cooked or canned beans rather than raw beans

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How about using chick peas instead?

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There are quite a few different enough bean seeds as well as other seeds you could use. Ensure you risk assess and have adult supervision especially if you have nibblers, or younger children who could choke. Obviously major allergies would be part of that risk assessment.

I'm a big believer in children learning what's safe and not safe especially in the natural environment, so ènjoy your activities.

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There are quite a few different enough bean seeds as well as other seeds you could use. Ensure you risk assess and have adult supervision especially if you have nibblers, or younger children who could choke. Obviously major allergies would be part of that risk assessment.

I'm a big believer in children learning what's safe and not safe especially in the natural environment, so ènjoy your activities.

I don't necessarily disagree Mundia, but I am concerned when these art activites make their way home. They maybe left unattended, then any child could pick away at the art work.

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Thank you all for your replies. I will rethink things.

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There was a photo of a maths activity on Twitter yesterday where children were sorting (what looked liked to me) red kidney beans and flagolet(??) beans - I did think of this thread and wonder ....

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There was a photo of a maths activity on Twitter yesterday where children were sorting (what looked liked to me) red kidney beans and flagolet(??) beans - I did think of this thread and wonder ....

We used to use butter beans, so fairly large, painted them I seem to remember one side, say yellow the other red, throw them in the air and depending upon how they landed - more/fewer of each colour etc. Not sure I would today with my current cohort - they'll eat anything it seems.

 

We had cornflakes in the messy spot with diggers etc. the other day, one little boy stood there just eating and filling his pockets with them!

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