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Writing at 40-60+m


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What evidence would you use to support

  • continues a rhyming string, and
  • can segment the sound in simple words and blend them together and knows which letters represent some of them?

Thank you!

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Continues a rhyming string is easy if you play sound words, so if you say, 'cat, bat' can a child give you 'sat, mat' etc. obviously this is one that needs some explanation and might need two adults playing to model initially.

 

The other one was evidenced beautifully to me by a boy (4) last year. I was playing out SATPIN game ( pictures of things beginning with those letter sounds, thrown up into the air for the children to sort into piles depending on initial sounds) one child picked up a picture of a table and put it in the wrong pile. The little boy picked it up and gave it back to her, saying ' T, table. It's not a S, sable' he called across to me, ' it's a T, t - ay - b - l, isn't it? Is s-able a word? P, is p-able a word? N-able? I-able? Bull is, but there's no B!'

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What evidence would you use to support

  • continues a rhyming string, and
  • can segment the sound in simple words and blend them together and knows which letters represent some of them?

Thank you!

Well as it is writing, I would say they need to be able to write a rhyming string, similarly they can work out how to spell and write a few words using blending letters to make the sounds they need.

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I do 'rhyming soup' from letters and Sounds phase 1 - we work out a recipe together, then each child puts in an 'ingredient' written on a posh piece of paper. By the end I have a good idea of their understanding of rhyming for reading and writing.

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I do 'rhyming soup' from letters and Sounds phase 1 - we work out a recipe together, then each child puts in an 'ingredient' written on a posh piece of paper. By the end I have a good idea of their understanding of rhyming for reading and writing.

What a lovely idea! Thank you for that, marywilliam.

x

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I do 'rhyming soup' from letters and Sounds phase 1 - we work out a recipe together, then each child puts in an 'ingredient' written on a posh piece of paper. By the end I have a good idea of their understanding of rhyming for reading and writing.

 

May I ask what kind of 'posh paper' do you use?

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Just colourful A4 thin card cut into smaller pieces - as a change from white or recycled paper.

If I'm feeling particularly time-rich I use those fancy scissors to give the edge a pattern, but usually it's just a straight guillotine cut!

 

Thank you! Wouldn't have thought about the scissors - good idea.

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Continues a rhyming string is easy if you play sound words, so if you say, 'cat, bat' can a child give you 'sat, mat' etc. obviously this is one that needs some explanation and might need two adults playing to model initially.

The other one was evidenced beautifully to me by a boy (4) last year. I was playing out SATPIN game ( pictures of things beginning with those letter sounds, thrown up into the air for the children to sort into piles depending on initial sounds) one child picked up a picture of a table and put it in the wrong pile. The little boy picked it up and gave it back to her, saying ' T, table. It's not a S, sable' he called across to me, ' it's a T, t - ay - b - l, isn't it? Is s-able a word? P, is p-able a word? N-able? I-able? Bull is, but there's no B!'

 

DOH! WRITING!!!! Sorry (shamefacedly backs away)

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I'm not convinced that it is actually referring to writing. A few of the statements are in both the reading and the writing aspects and I think they are referring to the skills that they need in order to then read and write. For example, "begin to hear initial sounds in words." There are more specific statements that refer directly to their ability to write something down and, as we know, the physical aspect is separate to the skills needed to segment words etc.

Something that I learnt from my ELKLAN training is that children's success when first starting reading is directly linked to their ability to hear rhyming words and their ability to HOP!

But, of course, I could be totally wrong!

Let me know what you think!

Green Hippo x

Edited by green hippo
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I'm not convinced that it is actually referring to writing. A few of the statements are in both the reading and the writing aspects and I think they are referring to the skills that they need in order to then read and write. For example, "begin to hear initial sounds in words." There are more specific statements that refer directly to their ability to write something down and, as we know, the physical aspect is separate to the skills needed to segment words etc.

Something that I learnt from my ELKLAN training is that children's success when first starting reading is directly linked to their ability to hear rhyming words and their ability to HOP!

But, of course, I could be totally wrong!

Let me know what you think!

Green Hippo x

So, green hippo, if that is the case then it is perfectly okay to highlight the statement in both reading AND writing if the child is able to continue a rhyming string with confidence. Oh, I wish the DM statements were clearer and provided more/better examples!

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I a with Green Hippo here, i think we are talking about skills required for reading/writing, not necessarily reading or writing per se...but as said before, we are frankly in the dark as have absolutely no exemplifications at the pre school stage.

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I'm with green hippo too, as the ability to do the segmenting and blending in written form is not expected I believe till end of spring term/FSP point from what I know about my local schools. We are just having cluster mtgs for our area so schools are getting much more involved with us so it helps to know what your feeder schools position is on their moderation of the aspects too (not my best idea though if you have lots and lots of feeder schools) x

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