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Pay And Conditions


diesel10
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Hi Everyone

 

Having been sitting here most of the half term holiday doing paperwork and going into the setting to 'let the builders in' the thought of should I get paid 'all year' rather than term time plus 6 weeks holiday pay has been going through my head again.

 

All the other staff get paid / claim for everything plus two get paid 10 weeks holiday pay (they have worked there six months longer than me). I can see myself working most of the summer holiday to get everything ready for the new EYFS in September. I never claim overtime.

 

Do you think if I suggest this at the next committee meeting, I will be opening a can of worms. I finished my EYPS in Feb, but didn't get a pay rise. I do claim the council incentive for myself, (committee did kick up a fuss about that though even though it has been reduced by 60%). I do get 6 hours a week for paperwork but with a 25 place setting and 50+ children on the books this is never enough. Most of the time is spent with council meetings, emails.

 

What do you think / What do others get?

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EYPS does not always mean a pay rise. unless the setting needs one and you are re employed as one then your current contract and terms you were originally employed on still apply. This is probably why the setting were a bit concerned about you claiming the incentive yourself.. as it should really have been their job to do it.. if there is an enhancement for having eyp in your funding then this could be used for extra pay, but it is so flexible depending on the number of children that the implementation could be an issue.. covering the extra when not having the income being one some settings have.

 

I do question why if others are claiming for everything then you are not doing the same...why do you not claim the overtime, they have set a precedent by paying it to others.

 

I would ask the committee why there is one set of rules for some and not the same for all employees.. re the claiming hours etc.. and also ask how the holiday entitlement is worked out.. how some have so much more than others when there is no significant length of service that could explain added days usually, but weeks? many add an extra day for length of service but cannot see how 6 months employment gives 4 weeks holiday pay.

 

Most settings do only pay for the term time plus holiday entitlement.. often not as much as 6 weeks.. some do pay admin hours others not, some have manager not counted in ratio, which solves this issue of working from home or extra hours, or should do...some hire someone just to do the admin. .. often it depends on the income and on previous committee decisions..

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Ten weeks holiday pay :o

A term time only setting is open for 38 weeks, pro rata the holiday entitlement and you get 4.6 weeks holiday.

Always claim your overtime and expenses, there may come a day when someone who absolutely needs to claim finds it snt available anymore through others not claiming when they could. If everyone else is getting it you should too.

Keep a log of the work you do, the visits to let the builders in and anything else that eats into your holiday. Our staff are paid wages and holiday pay split over 12 equal monthly payments, but it also includes extra hours for paperwork so they dnt ofetn have overtime to caim but I would always make sure everyone was claiming what they are entitled to.

Phone the Chair, tell her that with the extra work you're doing over the holidays you'll be putting a claim form in, just so she isnt surprised when she gets it.

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It's difficult isn't it, and I too feel agrieved at the amount of work I do in my own time. I get a higher hourly rate than the rest of the staff as I am the one in charge, so I see the extra work as part and parcel of the job really. (It was the same when I worked in retail management.) I get the basic holiday pay (4.6 weeks) plus 4 hours per week for paperwork which is never enough as I'm in ratio during working hours. I have negotiated an hour a week extra pay for the staff to do their key children work, but i don't take this myself although I don't know why really as I have as many key children as everyone else. I suppose it may be because I am more aware of the finances.

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like rea my staff are now on a sort of salary scheme (so pay+hoilday+meetings etc split into 12 equal chunks) My deputy works part time in the setting and the rest of the time she does admin...she gets paid a different rate for the 2 jobs. I get paid a salary which i agreed upon a figure with the trustees. It does not cover all the hours i do but is at least a semi-resonable figure!!! (though i haven't had a payrise for 3 years) last year i did a lot of extra work because of the move and this year will have to change things for the new eyfs over the hols too. :(

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Thinking about this in a different way...

 

by logging all the actual hours worked and then with a bit of calculation work out what your actual hourly rate is. (by dividing the annual wage by the hours worked.. .)

 

it worries me that by doing so many unpaid hours many are actually paid below the minimum wage ...any extra paid for the added responsibility and all that goes with it gets lost ..

while I cannot see an argument for being paid all year even when closed, I can see one for extra hours.. ( I used to get 1 week extra pay a year during the summer to pay for the end of year paperwork and setting up for the new year. Plus one day extra end/beginning of each term for the extra involved in that time.. ) .

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Could the 10 weeks holiday pay just be 'rolled up/divided by 12', whilst the others are 'pay as you go + hols' ?...... just saying because we have the choice.

Otherwise that does seem a bit off!

 

It is a difficult one though - although I have started to be a bit more strict now- and actually prioritise what I need to do against what I'd like to do.

...and if we're honest - a lot of the 'like to's' are not actually essential.

 

Need to's are claimed, like to's are my choice.

I also try and deligate the 'like to's' a lot more -and I found this engages the staff a lot more too.

 

xx

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This is very difficult I found, in a committee run setting - in my case I was on far less than minimum wage due to hours I actually worked. I did start claiming overtime once I felt it was affordable - sometimes the money just isn't there.

Once I took over the 'business' myself it's far better as I have full control of the finances and if there's money there I take out extra 'dividends' and if money is tight I don't. Because I can see what's there, I don't resent this and of course the autonomy is great :) My staff get paid for what hours they actually do and get some non contact & paid time each term to complete reports etc.

If the money's there, you should claim it! If not, then it's very difficult

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Hi

 

Thanks for all your replies.

My to do list only includes bills, newsletters, accounts, accreditation. Which need doing otherwise I get behind with it all. My 6 hours admin is on a Friday, so another week gone if I leave it until then. I do try and give others jobs to do, but have found from experience that it doesn't get done ie accreditation unless I keep on top of it myself (then I feel like I should have done it anyway).

 

I like Inge's idea of extra during the holidays. The idea that everything stops in the holidays just doesn't work. I think I will let the committee know that 6 hours doesn't cover the admin and see what they say. It may mean getting an admin assistant?? Although it's difficult as I try and keep the wages bill down.

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