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Gifted And Talented


lashes2508
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Just wondering if anyone of you have had experience or experienced a child who is G & T - we currently have a child who will be starting school in September , there is no doubt of his gift of numbers, mathematics but his behaviour and social development is not as fully developed. Appparently this is quite expected of children who are gifted and mum is pursuing this further having got in touch with G & T association , this has come after

, voicing some concerns and have bought Hv in and spoke to both school and senco's with mum permission.

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I have one right now lashes! xD

 

Very, very bright little boy.......he is fascinated by 'machines' and shows a strong 'rotation schema' - I plan with him in mind - he only attends for two sessions each week (phew!) - he is a super little thing really - but behaviourwise he is a complete 'nightmare :ph34r: :blink: :1b

 

What sort of 'help' are you looking for?

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wow that was quick sunnyday , it's really wondering if all of our concerns are just because he is gifted or is it more ASD - i have just been reading on website NAGC- mum is hoping he will be accepted on to their pilot scheme for assessing his IQ and seeing Ed psych too. I know she was reluctant to push this but there is no doubt he is G & T but he is quite obsessive especially with time and how many minutes etc, he is very controlling but mum says so is his dad and grandad.

We are fortunate the primary school is small and we have good links but it's about getting in place assistance, support and strategies for him when he has his wobbles, he can get quite upset and distressed ( mum says at home it's more anger) also will he get left behind and bored.

His key person has always given him etc time and more challenging activities but this is not what he always wants and it is his social skills that need developing.

Is it possible to be both - the website says this is normal behaviour and mum is now repeating that which worries me that if there is more to it will he get what he needs, seems like a very fine line

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Interesting as my first thought was that child sounds like 2 I have taught who were both G and T but also ASD!!

 

I would say just work with the needs of the child. If ASD, the school will definately pick up on this, particularly as you have already voiced some concern.

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wow that was quick sunnyday , it's really wondering if all of our concerns are just because he is gifted or is it more ASD - i have just been reading on website NAGC- mum is hoping he will be accepted on to their pilot scheme for assessing his IQ and seeing Ed psych too. I know she was reluctant to push this but there is no doubt he is G & T but he is quite obsessive especially with time and how many minutes etc, he is very controlling but mum says so is his dad and grandad.

We are fortunate the primary school is small and we have good links but it's about getting in place assistance, support and strategies for him when he has his wobbles, he can get quite upset and distressed ( mum says at home it's more anger) also will he get left behind and bored.

His key person has always given him etc time and more challenging activities but this is not what he always wants and it is his social skills that need developing.

Is it possible to be both - the website says this is normal behaviour and mum is now repeating that which worries me that if there is more to it will he get what he needs, seems like a very fine line

 

xD 'Speedy' is my middle name!

 

I recognise everything you are saying lashes.......I did have SENCO observe my little chap........nothing very helpful came out of that.......

 

He does have a real problem with any form of 'group-time' - mine are fairly 'minimal' anyway - think that SENCO and I were in complete agreement that this is simply because he doesn't want to/finds it difficult to 'follow anyone elses lead' if you get my drift......

 

I have real concerns about how he will get on at school - he also starts in September.......he has a great time with us - he just loves pre-school - but that's with an adult:child ratio of 1:4 and as I said lots of planning based around his needs......

 

Sorry - a lot of waffle there and not a lot of real help......

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hi Lashes

Sounds like you have given this little chap lots of lovely 'unique child' time in your setting, supporting his needs and interests.

 

The behaviour and lack of social interaction does ring alarm bells - along with his talent for Math - however as theres not much time left before school I would just ensure that all this information reaches the reception teacher, along with your concerns and then trust that should he need additional support they will set the wheels in motion!

 

 

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i liked it sunnyday - it was helpful as it is what we are experiencing .the same, the HV came and observed with mum present but she was not sure as the child in question was having a good day and mm contradicted most things said , which was a shame but understandable, she was releived and cried when i initially spoke with her regarding concerns.

As said by eyfs 66 I have spoken with school senco and teacher , hv and area senco and parents and hopefully he will get the support he needs.

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I think if this was me i would set an iep for him with the help of his mum to give her a balanced view of his ups and downs! My feeling would also be that if she is prepared to go for an assessment (inc Phyc) then encourage it. In my experience i would always try to get these assessments done before entry into school then transition can be supported appropriately (it is also much more difficult when the children attend full time to get appointments sorted!) i also think it is unfair to the schools to 'pass on' a child who has not got needs that have not been discussed and some support put in place . Just my opinion of course :huh: ^_^

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hi Lashes

Sounds like you have given this little chap lots of lovely 'unique child' time in your setting, supporting his needs and interests.

 

The behaviour and lack of social interaction does ring alarm bells - along with his talent for Math - however as theres not much time left before school I would just ensure that all this information reaches the reception teacher, along with your concerns and then trust that should he need additional support they will set the wheels in motion!

 

thanks Rafa - if i had of been there form the start i would have been able to have got others involved before- HV, area senco, scholl senco and class teacher all involved and made aware of concerns so hopefully he will get support he needs.

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i also think it is unfair to the schools to 'pass on' a child who has not got needs that have not been discussed and some support put in place . Just my opinion of course :huh: ^_^

 

So true, but ultimately we have to work with the parent's permission and sometimes during the initial "discovery" phase of a problem, gaing their permission can be difficult, or indeed impossible. Denial is a very common reaction from parents, who are really not willing to contemplate let alone accept that a child may have additional needs, thus sometimes the best we as early years settings can do is sow the seeds of doubt, and put enough "clues" into the child's transition records for the school.

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Totally agree Eyfs 1966! I as a Senco am currently working alongside The Gang of Three ( Ed psyc, Specialist Teacher, and SALT) to support THREE sets of parents in accepting their child needs a team around them -2 going to school in Sept - and it's not easy!!

 

It always needs very careful handling and waiting on a paediatrician to come on board is pretty terrifying for some parents!! We have had two parents reject this next step, wanting to 'see' what happens in a couple of months! In the short time we have the children there is only so much you can do.......keep an open dialogue with parents and ensure the feeder school is aware is sometimes the option you are left with.

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Ment to add the Two Year Check in September will obviously support the earlier intervention and hopefully all children will be fully supported in their additional needs by the time they start school. :)

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I think if this was me i would set an iep for him with the help of his mum to give her a balanced view of his ups and downs! My feeling would also be that if she is prepared to go for an assessment (inc Phyc) then encourage it. In my experience i would always try to get these assessments done before entry into school then transition can be supported appropriately (it is also much more difficult when the children attend full time to get appointments sorted!) i also think it is unfair to the schools to 'pass on' a child who has not got needs that have not been discussed and some support put in place . Just my opinion of course :huh: ^_^

I completely agree with your opinion FM :D - I feel he should have had earlier intervention , unfortunately due to issues before i came and i think the focus being on his 'gift' noone seemed to think it was worth investigating!!? I approached mum gently and like i said she was relieved as she was unsure how he would cope at school , I am actively encouraging the route she wants to take as I have said there is no doubt he is gifted but only want the best for him to help him get whatever support he may need and emphasised this with mum. I am communicating with school so that we can get something in place before he starts as it is beneficial to all and we all know how long things can take !

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