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Safeguarding- Should We Record This?


klc106
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Hi

 

Today one of our little boys came in to the setting quite upset adn screaming when mum left. His key worker went over to try and comfort him and he told her his foot was hurting and was holding his foot. She told me and I went over to try and calm him down and he looked at me, stopped crying and said "mummy hurt my foot" i said "oh dear" and he then hit the wall and said "she smacked me like this and shouted". He was still holding his foot all the time he was talking to me. He said he wanted his mummy I then said mummy will be back soon and he proceeded to screaming again.

The child's key worker also said that she noticed a bruise on this child's ear but when she asked him what he did he did not want to talk (I didn't know about this until he had gone home)

 

I have never dealt with any safeguarding issues before. I did not tell mum about what was said. Should we record this in case anything does come of it? also do we need to tell mum what he told us?

 

Thanks

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Absolutely, yes. Do you have a system for recording 'existing injuries' - for parents to complete if their child has an injury?

Who has completed safeguarding training at your setting? You should have a 'phone number and contact for you to talk to informally for advice....

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Thanks Sunnyday

We have both completed the safeguarding training. We thought we should record it but just wanted to check we were not being over cautious. We don't have a form for pre-existing injuries but I will look into making one. His mum does normally tell us if he has hurt himself but this was not mentioned.

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Yes, I agree with Sunnyday. You need to be recording all these "little" incidents. One of the ways we do this, by way of gathering lots of bits of info, is to have a file and a piece of paper per child in it, staff can write down anything which they find concerning about any child on their piece of paper, in this way it can allow you to see a bigger picture of what is happening.

 

Was there any visible signs on his foot that it had been hurt?

 

An existing injuries form is quite easy to set up and have the forms handy for parents to fill in as soon as they drop off in the morning, the more you can make this accepted practice the easier it becomes, parents just get to know that this is what is expected of them and they don't feel like they are being judged. Accidents happen, but we do need to know about them because we may view an old injury as a new one, or caused by something we have done, or if a very recent injury there may be later outcomes for a child which we would need to know about, i.e. a head injury.

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Thanks Panders.

 

There was no physical signs on his foot that it had been hurt. I will set up the existing injuries forms starting tomorrow thanks to sunnyday for giving me a copy of her form. :1b

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Sunnyday's form is much better than mine (so I shall be sharing sunnyday's form into my setting ;-) ), but the thing we do have on ours is the time that the staff member & parent/carer sign it - so you can easily pick up the injuries that are disclosed by the adult on bringing the child in between those that we see afterwards & have to note & get signed.

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hi very interested in this topic

 

We have an incident/accident form for us - if a child falls etc within our setting and one for the parents which happen outside the setting

copies are kept within the childs file updated on a half termly basis - this is kept by the manager

Key workers keep observations and need to know information

 

Is this right?

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Sunnyday's form is much better than mine (so I shall be sharing sunnyday's form into my setting ;-) ), but the thing we do have on ours is the time that the staff member & parent/carer sign it - so you can easily pick up the injuries that are disclosed by the adult on bringing the child in between those that we see afterwards & have to note & get signed.

 

Here it is in my original form as a pdf so you can see where margins etc go

 

(helps if I actually attach it eh! Doh!)

Existing Injury Form.pdf

Edited by Cait
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  • 1 month later...

Yes an existing injuries form is a great idea, we have used these for a while now and file these within the child's personal details folder along with an "at a glance" existing injuries form for the more regular accurances, which helps to spot recurring problems easily, and this can sometimes really help spot things earlier that could have been missed. We also have a visual guidance plan that highlights uncommon accidental injury areas on the body to help us become aware if these areas are regularly injured.

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I do empathise with you and this situation. These experiences are always a bit unnerving. However, we all have a duty to ensure the safety and well being of childrne so I agree that this incident shoudl be recorded as a pre-existing injury and shared with the parent if you feel it is safe for the child to do so. If you have any concerns that the parent may cause further harm to the chidl by raising this incidnet with them you shoudl follow your child protection and safeguarding procedure and report this concern to the Children's Social Care Services.

 

In addiiton to the requirement to record details of pre-existing injuries and any concerns observed, it is also important to review information recorded and held on a regular basis to inform if any further action is required, or not required. In our area, best practice principles are to review regularly any information recorded on e.g. accident records, incident records, pre-existing injury records, child protection concerns and medication records to review and assess any trends or patterns which may identify that further action is required, depending on the individual situation, what the review is actually informing the reviewer about regarding any of the areas given as examples. Further assessment may be required in response to the review undertaken and then inform what further action is required to be taken.

 

I always find my early Years Development Worker very helpful to discuss any concerns I have about a child or situation in the setting. The Development Worker can help to unpick situations that arise and share or advise upon what possible further action is required to be taken, advise on best practice on how to record, manage information held within the setting and signpost settings to other agencies for further support. I also find my Area Inclusion Officer is very supportive to share any concenrs I have with.

Make sure also that all staff are up to date and informed about what to do if they have concerns about a child, review the setting policy,procedures and make sure any changes are added, information on your policy is shared with parents also to make sure you are working in line with regulatory requirements and the requirements of the Local Safeguarding Children Board.

 

I hope this is of some help, in addition to the sound advice you have already recieved from other posts.

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