Jump to content
Home
Forum
Join Us
Articles
About Us
Tapestry

Socket Covers


Guest TinklePrincess
 Share

Recommended Posts

Guest TinklePrincess

Apologies if this is in the wrong area - I'm not very good at choosing the correct area!

 

I have started my EYPS summer placement today, at a Sure Start Children's Centre, run by the local Primary Care Trust.

I was there last summer, also, and remember that the risk assessment forms for every session included a section to ensure that socket covers were all in place, however I went there today and they've recently been told, apparently from someone pretty high up, that they are to stop using them because, and I quote:

 

"someone saw something on the internet about a little boy playing with one and getting electrocuted"

 

Now forgive me if I'm wrong, but surely this can't be true - plastic doesn't conduct electricity!! Also, isn't it much safer for them to be covered? What if a toddler comes out of the water tray with his tiny fingers dripping wet, and touches the socket?!

 

Obviously we watch them, and the parents are there as it's a drop in service, but still, accidents do happen!

 

the practitioner also told me that they've had to remove EVERYTHING that is metal... just in case a child decides to play with the plug sockets with it... They had a beautiful metals treasure basket and other lovely objects that've had to be thrown away... Surely a big metal plate won't fit into the tiny little holes??!!

 

Anyway, rant over, just needed to let it out and now it's done... Just wondered what other people thought on this?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Now forgive me if I'm wrong, but surely this can't be true - plastic doesn't conduct electricity!!

We've discussed this before, TinklePrincess. From memory, it isn't that the protectors conduct electricity, it is that the protectors can be inserted incorrectly so that one or more of the holes where the pins of the plug is inserted can be accessed. You can find the previous discussion here which provides a link to the website of the research organisation who have done the work.

 

As for removing metal items from treasure baskets, I'd say this is a bit of an over reaction! I'd go back and ask where this is written down in policy and how it is justified!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest TinklePrincess

Oh I'm sorry, I couldn't see anything, I must have overlooked it!

 

They can't have policies - This is a new thing I've just discovered today - Another new addition!!

 

With regards to the metal... Because they're PCT run, they can only have the local PCT policies and anything else is just guidelines... But yeah, I'll definitely challenge it in the team meeting on Monday - I can't believe it!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We don't have socket covers and in March this year during our OFSTED inspections it was picked up. I simply explained why and she was absolutely fine,

 

For a child to be electrocuted they would have to insert something into the top hole which then opens the bottom two holes, then they would have to put something into the 'earth' hole.

 

The potential problem with socket covers is that if a child removes one and then tries to replace it and puts it upside down they are exposing the two bottom holes - that in itself is a risk so we read the research and decided to get rid of socket covers. That was over a year ago and to date no child has shown any interest in any socket, they did however show interest in the covers we used to have.

 

Guess it's a personal issue but we felt the plastic covers almost lulled us into a false sense of security. I used to think they were high on the list of 'must haves'

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think when I read the warning against their use it also said that Ofsted had been told not to fail someone for not using them.

We still use them because despite the warning the staff feel safer with what they're used to.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I honestly dont think a child could remove our socket covers- they are that tight and flush to the socket. I suppose if they tried for long enough they may manage it but I would be just as concerned about a child in my care being left alone for long enough to prise one out as I would about the chances of re inserting it the wrong way.

Honestly they are so tight that I often have to put a nail behind to get them away from the socket. Also one of the good things about being in an old hall we have very few sockets anyway!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I struggle to remove some of our socket covers - you need nails and I never have any! Interesting to read about how they could be dangerous - it hadn't even occurred to me that you could put them in upside down.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The safety film I imagine is linked to on the original thread makes it clear. The electrocution can happen if the child mouths the cover then puts in back in again.

 

As a chidlminder I could cop out by the way I placed furniture around the room.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest cathy m

I am a childminder and haven't used socket covers for a couple of years, my local childrens centre has just removed them due to someone from health mentioning that visitoring healthcare teams are now spreading the message to parents.

below is a link explaining more

http://www.fatallyflawed.org.uk/

 

Cathy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. (Privacy Policy)