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I didn't know there were any xD

 

Peggy

 

p.s. We find lots in our preschool garden, so I would like to know if I need to add ladybirds to my risk assessment :o

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Could someone please tell me which ladybirds are poisonous to humans?  :o

29667[/snapback]

 

Are we talking about eating ladybirds or just prodding them?

 

Maz

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with or without sticks maz? xD

 

I didnt think any ladybirds were poisonous, I know they all bite if they want to. Wasnt there a plague of them in the 70's where people were getting bitten a lot, possibly 76? The drought yr. I seem to remember that the heat made more greenfly which in turn made more ladybirds which gave more chance of being bitten by one. I'm going to have to look this up now :o:D

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Hmm. Looked at a few sites, but can only find references to their ability to 'produce toxic and foul-tasting fluids from their joints to repel would-be predators'. They seem to think this is only a problem if you eat them however!

 

Mind you, I know a few children who would be quite happy to do that...

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ladybirds, one of my pet subjects...

No, not usually poisenous, although Id take a guess that there is always the exception to the rule that just happens to be in your setting!

 

but do look out for the Harlequin ladybird which is a non native species thought to be the most invasive on the planet, and has been known to give a nip or two. It only arrived in the Uk last year and is threatening our native species in the south east and east. It is larger and rounder and generally has either a lot of spots or is black with 2 or 4 spots. If you should happen to see one in your investigating please report to

 

harlequin survey

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lady birds were eaten as a cure for toothache, so it is unlikely they are poisonous in small quantities. As they are very bitter curious children are unlikely to swallow them. As for risk assessments I think normal precautions for investigating anything outside ( do not eat and wash hands) would be .

They are well worth investigating and can be kept in doors for a few days if you provide them with some aphid infested foliage. It is a good idea to find pictures of their larvea, I have met many children and adults who have killed a good number of them without realisingwhat they were.

Do have a look at the harlequin site because there are lots species of british lady birds and they all vary enormously; even our common little two spot comes in four spot and red on black variations. One sure sign is a white M behind the head, only Halequins have it but not all them do.

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Ahh, 1976 - the only time in my 42 years I got a suntan!

 

I thought poisonous ladybirds were an old wives' tale - but I do seem to remember dire warnings about yellow ones when I was little.

 

All this ladybird talk reminds me of when my middle son was about two, and we found a ladybird in the garden. I put it in the palm of my hand so he could have a better look. He prodded it roughly and (in my sarcastic way) "oh that's right, squash it". He looked at the lady bird, looked at me and said "OK" and ground the poor thing into the palm of my hand.

 

I still have guilty feelings about her poor daughter Ann, waiting to be rescued from under that frying pan...

 

Maz

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I have a son like that. :o Four yrs ago when we had our brand new car, we were at the safari park. Youngest son started to open a mars bar while we were in the lions enclosure. ' Dont eat that in here' we yelled. 'Where can I eat it then?' 'Outside'. He opened the door xD:(

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Recently we found a ladybird outside the preschool, or should I say 2 ladybirds.

A smaller ladybird was on the larger ladybirds back. I told the children that mummy ladybird was carrying baby ladybird. The children and I were facinated, however, when the small ladybird started "jigging about" in a very "adult" fashion, I was then not sure whether it was a "baby" or not. :(

They remained in this position for over 2 hours, xD the smaller ladybird only getting off the larger ladybirds back when I placed them in a tub with some leaves. :o (exhausted smiley)

Now can anyone tell me if this was a lesson about nature or a lesson about biology! Does anyone know the "mating" habits of ladybirds? :)

 

Peggy

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