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Plaster Consent Forms


starsky
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Thanks I had seen this poster somewhere on my travels but was still told that it is best to have a consent form from parents. I think it is fine to put one on myself.....a little plaster makes it all better! We ask for any allergies when a child is registered with us so we would be aware of this kind of allergy. Thanks x

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who's asking you to get permission? hypoallergenic plasters are made of the same stuff as micropore ( the tape you would use to attach a bandage) so if you are going to get permission for plasters you probably should ask if you can do first aid on thier children! ( i'm only joking - just fed up of superscilious paperwork being dumped on us :oxD )

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We dont have a specific form for plasters. We ask parents if their child has any allergies, if they so no then as far as we are concerned they aren't allergic to plasters. We only have hypo allergenic ones anyway. We do ask permission for us to administer 1st Aid.

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One of our staff was previously told on their first aid training that you should ask permission to apply plasters. we have a form outlining the procedure for first aid and the procedure in event of an emergency. Form includes a list of all contents of first aid kit - parents sign to give consent for first aid and can cross out any items they don't want used on their child. they then give their consent for emergency treatment.

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Ours is on the registration form

 

Do you give your permission for your child to receive basic First Aid at the group, including the use of plasters or creams by a qualified First Aider, and/or for the group to seek emergency medical aid. Yes/No

 

(Please sign if permission is given) ________________________________________________________________________________

_____________

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just been told at our first aid course -

May have been from health and safety executive will try to find out for you

quote from pre-med health care

"Do NOT put sprays, antiseptic wipes, creams, lotions, tablets or medicines in a first aid kit intended for use on children"

will get beck to you about the source! :o

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No, not at all, it was more of a 'resigned' "Ok, thanks" in a "Plus ca change, plus c'est la meme chose" type of way.

 

(wish they'd stop changing things and trying to catch us all out - that's what it feels like"

 

The only cream we use is arnica on unbroken skin, and Mrs O was ok with that. There's no antiseptic cream or tablets or antiseptic wipes in the box, or tablets ...........

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I know the feeling - always thinking i may have missed out on something and the only one who will notice is ofsted....

(they are not my favourite people as they messed our inspection up so much they had to re-do - after i complained!!)

to be fair i think this is new legislation - our first aid trainer trains the paramedics! oh and the doctors!!

you may want to re-think the arnica too! :o OMG BETTER GO BEFORE YOU KILL ME!!!

xD:(:(

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sorry cait we've been told unless it's perscribed for that child you can't use it xD i guess just in case they have an allergic reaction to it.

We have on one occassion been able to get a doctor to perscribe aveeno cream for a child with a skin condition :o

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Guest jenpercy
Thanks everyone for replies x Very helpful!

 

Antiseptic creams etc have been outlawed in first aid courses for 20+ years. I can remember when we were actually told to stop using them - although these days it is often not mentioned as it is so old hat!

 

actually having just renewed my First Aid, I don't remember allergies to First Aid products bein g mentioned - was I asleep for that bit 12 hours for what we used to do in 6.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hi

We don't use any creams etc and never have done - but we do use hypoallergenic plasters (with permission), and we too were told at most recent first aid course not to use anything except water on a child! even with permission!!!!!! apparently it is more likely for an allergic reaction to happen the second time a child has been in contact with the substance - so even if something was used at home - there is no guarantee that it would be safe to use on the child at nursery.

Hijacking this post but along the lines of paperwork nightmare - at our most recent fire safety check, we were told we needed to do PAT (recording form) for everything which has has a plug on it everytime we use it!!!!!!!

Not amused!

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we were told we needed to do PAT (recording form) for everything which has has a plug on it everytime we use it!!!!!!!

Not amused!

 

 

even the kettle for a brew! xD:o

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Guest jenpercy

Back to good old Health & Safety myths

 

http://www.hse.gov.uk/myth/july.htm

 

We have our bouncy castle blower PAT checked reguarly (it's made of metal - and we were once advised it was LIVE!!

 

But a lot of equipment such as computers cannot be PAT tested.

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Our equipment is PAT tested every year by the owners of the hall, this year we had to throw out an old radio (nobody knew whose it was anyway, it was never used) one of those multi plugs and a plug was changed on something used by the toddler group. Surely testing by daily usage is a little overkill - I didn't watch the guy doing the testing so wouldn't have a clue how to do it anyway - I was made aware that it was to do with a covering on one of the pins on the plug, but that was about all!

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Guest jenpercy

Actual PAT testing is done by a machine, so you can't do it yourself. computers, play stations etc cannot be done (I think because it would blow them) I am about to sort out our electrical testing again, so will test further. Our resident expert (Caretaker has own machine) tells me that the most important thing is to check that wiring isn't kinked or that cord isn't pulled away from plug so that inside wires are showing. You could write up that you have done these visual checks more often than once a year, say every one or two months

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