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Routines!


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hello,

I have devised a routine for the Pre-school, room.I feel it will be beneficial in order to get jobs done also ie register and also for children to have a structure to the day and also in order to get all activities included.I have included the nursery routines and activities which occur.I feel their is a balance between child initiated activities and adult initiated and directed .I hope you can give me some feedback beforeI show the manger tomorrow thanks! I am sure you are allowed a routine in EYFS anyway any feedback would be great thanks!!

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Come and have a look at Pre-School's Daily routine!!!

 

7:15-8.30am-Free Play and settling in time.

 

8:30-08:55-Breakfast/toast time encouraging social interaction

 

09:00-9:15-Register/Discussion time.Children gain confidence speaking in front of peers.

09:15-09:50 Children access a range of Adult supported and Free choice activities

 

09:55-10:15Adult focus activity in response to the curriculum(Early years Foundation stage)

10:25-10:50 -Outdoor Provision encouraging children's muscle development and contributing to their confidence.

10:50-11:15 Continuous Provision ie free choice activities offering them various learning experiences.

11:15:11:30-Story time/Song time based on children's own interests.

11:30-12:15 Dinner time allowing children to socialise in small groups.Tooth brushing and face washing occurs after dinner!

 

12:15-1:15 Quiet time.Children can rest and take part in activities such as puppet play,Stories,Drawing,Puzzles,and various other quiet activities!

 

1:15-1:30 Register/discussions allowing children who have joined the session to share news and sign themselves in.

 

1:35-2:00-outdoor provision(depending on staff ratio)/Free choice activities

 

2:05-3:10 Activities such as craft,collaging,messy activities and musical games are introduced to broaden experiences and also activities based on childrens own interests.

3:15-3:25 Story time/Song time

 

3:30-4:00 -Afternoon snack time.Children eat an evening meal encouraging social interaction amongst their peers

4:00-6:15 Free play and independant choice of activities.Children are settling down ready to go home!

 

Please note that the above Routine is an example only as Routines remain very flexible.

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Here's ours

9 - 9.10 Arrive and Register

9.10 - 10.30 Indoor, outdoor and free play

Including: Small world play, Computer, Jigsaws, Construction, Threading, Games, Painting, Drawing, Role Play, Cutting & Sticking, Books and quiet time, Sand, Water, Dough + any requests

10.30 - 10.45 Handwash and snacktime

Social & Group time

10.45 - 11.15 Key Person Group time - Activities in Key Groups, either general or tied to current theme

11.15 - 11.30 Story and songtime Including Plenary

11.30 - 12.30 Lunchtime

12.30 - 12.40 Arrive and Register

12.40 - 2.20 Indoor, outdoor and free play

as morning

2.20 - 2.40 Handwash and snacktime

Social & Group time

2.40 - 3.00 Story and songtime Including Plenary

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i got that quote of a site!i think you need it to be particularly flexible though ie the times cannot always be that settime ie the weather may be wet so you can't go out or may need to change wet clothing.dinner may be late so you may need to read for abit longer.It also depends on their interests too ie thay may not want to go outside at that time!!but in general i will try to have aset times.That routine looks good cait

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I think flexibility is the key to a successful day! Children may become fascinated by something and not want to stop so it's important to be bale to do that - some days our group time goes totally by the board, or if it's raining first thing we may do it first and then spend all day outside - even snack and dinner some days!

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I think flexibility is the key to a successful day! Children may become fascinated by something and not want to stop so it's important to be bale to do that - some days our group time goes totally by the board, or if it's raining first thing we may do it first and then spend all day outside - even snack and dinner some days!

Couldn't agree more birthday girl!

 

Sunnyday

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Hi

 

I think the routine should be fairly fixed, ie snack time, story time etc but if one day you planned to read a particular story but all the children were excited about a butterfly in the garden you could then read 'The very hungry catepillar' for example instead of your intended book. This way you are flexible, have adjusted your plans to meet the children's interests but kept to your routine.

 

As Susan says, I do feel children quite like structure and take comfort from those routines. I remember one day in my setting where we changed round the morning as we were having a visitor coming to play the violin and could only come at a certain time and some of the children could not get their heads round doing things in the wrong order as they put it.

 

Sue

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I agree wholeheartedly that children flourish where there is a routine. I have found that routine is particularly important for children who don't have any structure or routine in other aspects of their lives. Children feel secure when they know what is happening and what is expected of them. That said, a flexible routine means that the same things happen but sometimes the timing may not be spot on. The children are not clock watching after all and if, for example, they are really interested in something it is a shame to stop abruptly rather than follow their interest. If there are going to be changes for special events then talking to the children beforehand, and planning together, can help them manage.

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P.S.E.D. - MAKING RELATIONSHIPS - 30-50 months

 

'Demonstrate flexibility and adapt their behaviour to different events, social situations and changes in routine'.

 

 

Although I agree to some extent that routine is important - and further to that almost all of our sessions do follow a usual routine - there are certainly times when fantastic opportunities would be missed if we were to be too concerned with this.

 

It is a good 'test' of development to see which children are comfortable enough to adapt and those that you may have to reassure and give an explanation - mine only ever worry that they may have 'missed' something - I just explain "well we just didn't have time for that today because you were so busy doing (whatever)"

 

Sunnyday

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I feel routines are very important for children who are still settling in. In my setting we have the same routine every day but times do vary depending on what the children are up to. I find it reassures a new child to be able to say after play we will have snack, then a story and then mummy/daddy will be back etc. mrsW.

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I feel routines are very important for children who are still settling in. In my setting we have the same routine every day but times do vary depending on what the children are up to. I find it reassures a new child to be able to say after play we will have snack, then a story and then mummy/daddy will be back etc. mrsW.

I completely agree - but certainly for this term when I am not 'settling' new children - I just love the freedom to be flexible and more importantly so do the children!!!

 

I also like to give them choices i.e. shall we do so and so or would you like some more time for what you are doing etc. etc.

 

We all need to learn to deal with change and if we can do this in a place where we feel secure whatever happens so much the better!

 

Sunnyday

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I think you have been very wise eccimcca to sort out a routine for your room to try to overcome some of the difficulties you have been talking about in other posts. A reflective practioner :o

I think beginning with a routine, so that you all know who's doing what and when, will help everyone settle down and know their responsibilities. The children will know what to expect and what is expected of them. People on here are also a good source of ideas and we are all different and have to find what works in our own setting. You can adapt and change as necessary once it is all up and running, then you will able to become more flexible within your routine as the children's needs dictate.

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I completely agree - but certainly for this term when I am not 'settling' new children - I just love the freedom to be flexible and more importantly so do the children!!!

I know what you mean Sunnyday, our older children would probably only notice if the routine changed if they became hungry and we had missed out snack time!!! mrsW.x

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I know what you mean Sunnyday, our older children would probably only notice if the routine changed if they became hungry and we had missed out snack time!!! mrsW.x

Absolutely Mrs W!!!

 

Now I know I'm really 'banging on a bit now' - but this is something I feel quite strongly about (had you noticed) - we all know children and even some adults who find change 'mind blowing' - if only they had learned how to handle it when they were 4!

 

Right that's my final post on the subject (well maybe, I'm always open to change!!!)

 

Sunnyday

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well thanks for the input guys brilliant as usual!!yeah the routine has been deemed ok! It gives a key focus to days events ie not just a balance of CI and AI activities.It also gives time to do activities and enough time for children to have free choice .It has set times ie dinner,snack.As long as the activity is done,I feel the rest can be pretty flexible!still need to work on organisation but think this will be a great material to work from for the days event s!!

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It might be worth pointing out (or might be just stating the bleeding obvious!), that you can only be flexible with a routine if you have a routine in the first place. Good luck with implementing it eclmmcca! :o

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It is ALL about Flexibility, Spontaneity, Resourcesfulness, Adaptability, Versitality, isn't it?

 

I wonder if a clever forum boffin can make a good acronym out of that after all our profession thrives on acronyms.....come on all you EYPs, QTS, NQT, PGCEs, GTPs, SCITTs ? :o

Edited by Guest
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It might be worth pointing out (or might be just stating the bleeding obvious!), that you can only be flexible with a routine if you have a routine in the first place. Good luck with implementing it eclmmcca! :o

Language Timothy!!!

 

But yes, of course that's completely right. Oh, didn't I promise 'no more posts on this subject' - oh well!

 

Sunnyday

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Language Timothy!!!

 

But yes, of course that's completely right. Oh, didn't I promise 'no more posts on this subject' - oh well!

 

Sunnyday

 

Steve is always right, didn't you know! :o

 

I suppose the word routine conjures up different things, depending on how you take the meaning. To me a routine is more a list of the order you do things in, rather than a set time. So you might well be flexible with timing, but still make sure that you have a story before snack to calm the children down. I think the key is to make sure your routine isn't too prescriptive, as then that gives you more room for responding to the children as and when needed. xD

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