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1:1 Correspondance


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I wonder if anyboday can help me or have encountered similar problems with children in their class. I have a boy in my class (5 years 4 months), who seems to be unable to count using 1:1 correspondance. I am worried he is going to go up to year 1 not having achieved any of the nursery goals for NLC or calculating. I have tried everything I can think of to try and get him to point to each object in turn as he counts and have modelled everyday in 1:1 sessions with him. His mum has tried at home as well and is equally worried. He cannot count 3 objects reliably.

 

I have tried getting him to count things that make a sound when he touches them, counting the windows in sticklebricks so he physically has to push his finger into each hole in order to count and have used his interests which at the moment is cars and trains. We have played board games where he has to move his counter a certain number of spaces. It is as if his brain is working and he is counting correctly in his head, but his hand moves slower than his brain, therefore when he has counted them all in his head, he still has one more to count with his hand as he always counts 1 more than is actually there. I'm not sure if this is actually what is happening but I can't think what else it could be!

 

Any suggestions would be great! I can't think what to do any more!

 

Charlotte

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if you show him 1, 2 or 3 objects does he just say the amount correctly? If so, he has good conservation of number. If not it may be useful to cover this 1:1 counting on an IWB, where the objects appear when the IWB is touched with the pen. I have taught children like him and it has been a case of maturity - things suddenly clicked in aut 1 Y1! Is his progress with the other areas of NLC and Calc going ok? If so, I wouldn't worry too much.

 

Jennim

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Try getting him to move each object as he counts it rather than just pointing, such as counting one at a time as he puts counters in a pot, cones in a basket, tins in a cupboard, coins in a purse etc.

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Yes JacquieL, that's what I'm doing with one of our boys at the moment who has exactly this problem, he can rote count no bother at all but no conservation except to two (on a dice etc) and no correspondence at all

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Hi Charlotte.

Good advice already re recognising 1 2 or 3 objects.

Another thing to try is counting sounds or making a given number of sounds.. a significant number of children can count sounds before they can count objects (eg you clap 3 times and he has to count how many claps). Can he beat drum 3 times? This would give you an idea as to whether or not its the actual action of pointing or touching that is causing the difficulty? Also does he confidently know the counting sequence?

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I find chocolate buttons a great incentive to counting. Try putting some in a bowl and asking the child to move them one at a time into another bowl while counting (those double cat bowls are good for this)

I think real objects should be used at first (not pictures) and as has been said already physically moving them from one place to another helps

Edited by Marion
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Hi everyone and thanks for all the advice! Unfortunately I do not have an interactive whiteboard so I can't try that option. I have tried him moving objects and counting claps etc but he is still unable to do it. He can count to 10 without any trouble and recognises numbers to 10 but cannot tell me how many items without counting - not even 1 object! The trouble is that he seems to have a complete mathematical block as he struggles with shape, length, empty/full etc so it doesn't appear to be just counting that he has problems with. I find myself getting frustrated with him, which isn't fair on him so if anybody can suggest anything else that would be fab! Will def try all the suggestions I haven't done yet!

 

Charlotte

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Is it only PSRN area he has problems with? What are his physical skills like, and letter/sound recognition? What's he like with construction activities?

Sometimes linking learning with music is very helpful, such as mundia's suggestions, but also any singing number rhymes, but using objects to illustrate these. I can understand your frustration but I think you will just have to persevere and not let him get too stressed about it. Difficult I know.

Thereare two very good articles about developing mathematical awareness and developing mark-making which could be of help to you. If you go into Articles on the left of this page and click on Members Articles and scroll down you will find:

 

Playful Pedagogy and Transitions in Children's Mathematics

 

The Importance of Young Children's Mark-making: Beginnings, Context, Meaning and Mathematics

 

These may be of help, as perhaps the time has come to address this child's difficulties from another angle.

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Unfortunately tests for dyscalculia aren't effective below the age of 6 so children can be considerably behind by the time they are diagnosed. The general advice is lots of concrete experience and "overlearning".

 

"Dyscalculia is a specific learning disability involving maths skills.

 

It may be a difficulty with counting and calculating, understanding abstract maths concepts or working with numbers and symbols.

 

Key characteristics

 

Children with dyscalculia may have:

 

* normal or above average verbal skills and a good visual memory for the printed word

* difficulty understanding maths concepts, rules and sequences, especially time and money

* a tendency to make substitutions, transpositions, omissions and reversals when reading and writing numbers

* a poor sense of direction (eg. confusing left and right, getting easily lost, losing things) and time (eg. often arriving late)

* difficulty recalling names and faces

* poor mental maths skills

* poor coordination when involved in activities requiring change of direction such as aerobics, exercise and dance sessions

* difficulty with keeping score in games or working out strategies in chess."

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