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Emergency Evacuation Procedure


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As we all have to, we have had a procedure in place and practise it with the chldren (though not as often as we probably should)

Last year our numbers grew and we started to ask the children to remove their shoes when they came in - partly to save our carpet and partly to lessen trodden on finger type accidents...

DH built a fab box with attached frame with coat hooks and it's all really civilised. UNTIL I was updating our risk assessments etc and realised we were due another drill. Now my problem is what should I do about their shoes?? Obviously I can't start a drill then wait while potentially 12 children try to all get their shoes on... We keep our buggies up outside so the non-walkers can be put straight into those so they're not so much of a problem but still....

In a real emergency of course we'd just all get out and wouldn't worry about bare feet but is it appropriate to be taking them outside in bare feet (cold, germs, hazards...) for a drill?

Any ideas? I can't be the only minder who has a no shoes indoors rule....

Edited by Hello Kitty
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As we all have to, we have had a procedure in place and practice it with the chldren (though not as often as we probably should)

Last year our numbers grew and we started to ask the children to remove their shoes when they came in - partly to save our carpet and partly to lessen trodden on finger type accidents...

DH built a fab box with attached frame with coat hooks and it's all really civilised. UNTIL I was updating our risk assessments etc and realised we were due another drill. Now my problem is what should I do about their shoes?? Obviously I can't start a drill then wait while potentially 12 children try to all get their shoes on... We keep our buggies up outside so hte non-walkers can be put straight into those so they're not so much of a problem but still....

In a real emergency of course we'd just all get out and wouldn't worry about bare feet but is it appropriate to be taking them outside in bare feet (cold, germs, hazards...) for a drill?

Any ideas? I can't be the only minder who has a no shoes indoors rule....

 

 

In our nursery the chidlren wear slippers - when we do fire drills out we go in slippers!! They get wet and muddy but the children do need to learn that if the fire alarm goes off they just have to get out!

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I would practice the drill 'as the real thing'. To maintain 'regular' drills, I used to 'book' them in my diary for the year ahead, different days, different times, including arrival and collection times. I would also add drills within a few weeks of new children or staff starting. As I was a preschool I also ued to ask my deputy to do a few 'surprise' drills, just for my benefit too. :o

 

Peggy

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If you don't have slippers or plimsoles as the norm and childr are in socks/barefeet then carry out the drill shoeless (is there such a word). My reason behind this is that if there is a child barefoot, and you do really need to evacuate the child won't 'refuse' to go outside, or get upset about going outside without footwear.

The aim is to make the drill or a real evacuation as seemless and quick as possible.

 

I've seen plimsoles in Asda and Matalan, some nice velcro fastening ones that are easier to put on and off than the slip on ones that are so difficult to put the childs' heel in.

 

Peggy

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Here's a thought - should we practice emergency 'back inside again' when everyone's already outside, in case of unforseen eventualities too?

 

I think I must be misreading your post (been a long day!!) but the idea of the practice is so children and staff know what to do in the even of a real emergency. In a real emergency why would you want to go back inside??

 

(Think I may regret asking this but hey ho!! as I said it's been a long day!! :o )

 

Your post made me think of something that came up for discussion recently. Our evacuation procedures focus on obviously getting the children out but also include taking mobile and parental contact details.

 

Once outside with a group of children (coatless and maybe barefoot) what do you actually do with them in the interim period whilst waiting for parents to collect? We are now amending our policy/procedures to include this.

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We do Cait. We regularly blow the Emergency whistle and everyone exits the garden area as quickly as possible. This is written into our safety policy and our intruder policy. I have always done this since being at my setting, I was lucky enough to meet Lisa Potts many years ago, she came to the day nursery I used to work at and she talked about her experience. It physically upset me and is forever in my mind!! :o

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Well, I suppose it's a long shot - but what if there was a marauding dog or a 'nasty man' or whatever - we'd all be safer indoors wouldn't we? Possibly more likely that children would be reluctant to go inside.

 

Dunno really - like I said, it was just a thought!

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Once outside with a group of children (coatless and maybe barefoot) what do you actually do with them in the interim period whilst waiting for parents to collect? We are now amending our policy/procedures to include this.

We will go to the pub! :o

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Your post made me think of something that came up for discussion recently. Our evacuation procedures focus on obviously getting the children out but also include taking mobile and parental contact details.

 

Once outside with a group of children (coatless and maybe barefoot) what do you actually do with them in the interim period whilst waiting for parents to collect? We are now amending our policy/procedures to include this.

 

We have an emergency evacuation bag which contains those big foily blankets, tissues, contact details, medication, nappies, wipes, water, cups and biscuits. We also have a contingency plan and somewhere to go and sit in the warm and dry to wait for parents to collect!! My other concern was unless the mobile is fully charged I am not sure I would be able to phone 40 sets of parents, so in ur warm dry place we have use of a land line!!

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Well, I suppose it's a long shot - but what if there was a marauding dog or a 'nasty man' or whatever - we'd all be safer indoors wouldn't we? Possibly more likely that children would be reluctant to go inside.

 

Dunno really - like I said, it was just a thought!

 

AH! I get it now!! :o (said i would regret my earlier message!!)

 

A very good thought too! We haven't got a documented procedure for this but think it's something we need to do.

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We don't either, should we write it - or is it just risk assessment common sense!?!?!?!

 

Debatable I suppose!

On the basis that we have policy/procedure for emergency evacuation from the premises I guess it wouldn't hurt to add a section that covers such evacuation from the outdoor area.

 

Having said that it is common sense and an 'on the spot risk assessment'.

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Reading this it has made me wonder what I would do if we were outside and there was a fire inside? I'd need to go back into the building and get the children's details folder and register so I could ring parents/do a roll call etc.

 

So I need an evacuation bag too - a nice brightly coloured Ikea drawstring bag should do the trick... luckily I have several in the cupboard. xD

 

And I shall need to factor in evacuation drills from the outside inside...

 

Blimey... :o

 

Maz

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my turn for silly questions now, if children are wearing slippers what do they do if they want to go outside and play? we try and operate free flow for most of the session and it's bad enough putting coats, hats and scarfs on and off, never mind shoes, how do you cope? mrsW

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it's bad enough putting coats, hats and scarfs on and off, never mind shoes, how do you cope? mrsW

mrsW I had a tutor once who said that no question is a silly question.. except perhaps asking if Graham Norton is Irish... :o

 

We don't offer free flow play as such, but we go outside first thing in the morning so children don't change into their indoor shoes until they come back inside. However we do have limited flow from the outside into our foyer area and in this case children will take off muddy boots to come inside, but generally keep their outdoor shoes on.

 

We encourage our children to learn to do their own shoes really quickly! xD

 

Maz

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mrsW I had a tutor once who said that no question is a silly question.. except perhaps asking if Graham Norton is Irish... :o

 

We don't offer free flow play as such, but we go outside first thing in the morning so children don't change into their indoor shoes until they come back inside. However we do have limited flow from the outside into our foyer area and in this case children will take off muddy boots to come inside, but generally keep their outdoor shoes on.

 

We encourage our children to learn to do their own shoes really quickly! xD

 

Maz

I can understand why, the thought of changing 30 pairs of shoes fills me with fear!! Its a good idea though, our cleaner would probably buy each child a pair!!! mrsW

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