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We have a little boy in our setting that is obsessed with a toy wheelbarrow. He chooses it everyday, if he cannot find it he will ask an adult for it. He puts things in it, usually his toy George pig or other items he finds on his travels. How can i extend this?

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I am assuming you have looked up "transporting schemas" on google.  Can you tell us anything more about your little boy, for instance, his age, whether he has EAL etc.  Have you found any information from the family like, does he do similar things at home, or does dad or granddad use a wheelbarrow which he has observed?  Is there a media character he likes like Mr. Bloom

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2 hours ago, jasminerose said:

We have a little boy in our setting that is obsessed with a toy wheelbarrow. He chooses it everyday, if he cannot find it he will ask an adult for it. He puts things in it, usually his toy George pig or other items he finds on his travels. How can i extend this?

 

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Hello Panders, the little boy in question is EAL. He willl be going up to reception this September. The other children do have a job to understand him because he has a very quiet voice, although is resonably confident in himself. I will look up Mr Bloom, sounds interesting. I have heard of transporting schema activities but i have never seen a child have such a bond with something, he has played with it everyday outside for 10 months. There are two other plastic wheelbarrows but he only likes the metal one.^_^ 

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Could you encourage the children to work together to draw a chalk obstacle course for the child to steer his wheelbarrow around? There could be checkpoints along the way- where he could collect items that interest him? This could bring in other children to use the plastic wheelbarrows to follow the same course.

Lots of directions this may go in for different children- stopwatches to see how fast they can go round the course, or language development discussing their collections for example...

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I have a slight problem with this...what is he going to do when he goes to school...he can't take the wheelbarrow with him?  What else does he do during the day? Is this a way of him removing himself from the effort of conversing and playing with his peers? perhaps your efforts should be to try and ease him away from this particular toy and provide other opportunities for his development. How are the rest of his gross motor movements (swinging and climbing for instance) perhaps remove the wheelbarrows for a few days and provide some other stimulation in the same vain. We have ikea trays in the setting which have small holes in the side ...you can thread a string through these and use them to pull things around the garden (pulling rather than pushing will be a new skill) or could you get some fruit boxes from the supermarket and make some pull/push transporting toys?

I'd be really interested to see what he does when this toy is not available!

 

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He would still have access to the wheelbarrow when in reception because the play area is used by both Nursery and reception. Although other team members may react differently to him of course. He is a very sociable happy little chap who likes to play with his peers, it’s just they do not always hear what he says. He kind of runs along behind others twittering away quite merrily. During inside time he is generally learning in all different areas, as it is less noisy others can hear him and interact with him.  He is not attached in a worrying way to the wheelbarrow, there are never tears for instance if he cannot have it. I just thought as he loves to play with it, it is a good opportunity to make use of it as a learning tool. I was thinking of reading Handas Surprise to the children and maybe all children could get involved by ferrying fruit in it amongst other things:)

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Do you have any big blocks?

Perhaps you could get him moving those from one place to another, perhaps delivering to other children who are building...…..could get some good counting opportunities here :)

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