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Teaching Art/Creativity


Ruksana
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Dear all,

 

My name is Ruksana and I currently write articles for the EYFS Forum community. I am posting today as there is a possibility of producing a book on teaching art/creativity which targets the early years, Reception and Year 1. I want to step away from the norm of an academic text and want it to be a practical guide for the readers. Helen has kindly allowed me to contact this vibrant community for some food for thought!

 

I would like to gain your views on what you as practitioners, teachers, trainees, students or even parents would expect from a book whose aim is to support you in teaching art/creativity to children in these year groups? Any thoughts, comments etc. are welcomed and will be very much appreciated! It would also be nice to know what your own thoughts around art/creativity teaching is and your own childhood experiences!

 

I look forward to reading some interesting responses!

 

Best wishes,

Ruksana

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What I wouldn't want or need is just another book of ideas (pinterest is my friend ;) ) but a more thoughtful approach on what and how to approach art activites (not so much music or drama for me) . We have a process for teaching scissor control and use for example but paint is often used in a much more haphazard way.Maybe thinking about how to improve FM skills/GM skills/maths/literacy etc etc through art? one of my favourite blogs is OT mama and she has very specific tasks for improving FM skills....but then that's not really creativity is it????? :wacko:

 

sorry im sure that's not much help.....more of a random thought process ::1a

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I'm trying to think what Creativity means to me....

 

Do we teach creativity or do we teach the process?

 

We need to provide the resources that make the creative process/exploration possible.

 

I have always thought we can teach everything with an easel and paint. Position, number, colour, science, language.... so I suppose its up to us as teachers to use the language during the creative process that links it with the other areas? :unsure:

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I helped at a friends nursery years ago. She'd just taken over as manager and told me I could do what I wanted so I took all the ingredients to make dough, then changed my mind and just put all the stuff out for the children to explore.

 

I was working with a young girl who struggled a lot, all morning with this, constantly asking me 'What are we making?'

 

When my friend popped in she tried, as I had to explain the process of just playing, but I'm not sure either of us were very successful, I'd be surprised if she stayed in childcare actually :rolleyes:

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Oh absolutely! That drives me mad....although, when I was training our tutor said to say to the child 'Tell me about your painting/model/picture'.

 

I overheard a dad say 'whats that?' about his sons model using 'junk' so I told him what our tutor had said.

 

Dad bent down to his son and said 'Tell me about your model'

 

Son replied 'its boxes and glue' Dad raised his eyebrows at me as if I was nuts! ::1a

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What about perspectives on what creativity actually is and how it is supported?

The debate (of which there have been many here) about colouring in and either it's benefits or not , depending on your viewpoint. Or the role (or not!!) Of providing a plan of something to make and how this supports or hinders the development of creativity.

maybe a case study following a settings attempts to change what it does to support art/creativity, the challenges involved and the impact on children's development over time?

 

I'll think on...

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I think with young children we have to plan certain things in order for them to be aware of the materials and methods that are available 'I know that I know nothing' springs to mind.

 

I've got a colouring book. I love it, its relaxing and I can let my mind wander, dipping into my pens randomly or I can think about a colour scheme or patten and plan it.

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Rea,

 

The colouring book example is excellent! Creativity is not just restricted to the arts, what you describe automatically gets you to think of the patterns, colour schemes, what complements each other, what will work together, what won't - problem solving, trial and error, ideas - one would say concepts used in all learning/subject areas don't you think? ::1a

 

Best wishes,

Ruksana

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I think that creativity is a great leveller. Children who may struggle with physical, or social aspects of play and learning find that basic creativity is the same for everyone. Whether we are dropping paint soaked old teabags from a great height to create something entirely random as a group, or doing something on a smaller scale that involves eye droppers and food dye - and everything in between, there's no obvious 'wrong' way to make the creation you have in your head. We have to all read and write basically the same to be understood. Mathematics is rigid in right and wrong answers, as are the sciences and history/geography. But to create something from your own thoughts is a bit magical in a way, and it's the process of learning how to use the tools at your disposal, to make whatever you like that's important.

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I think that creativity is a great leveller. Children who may struggle with physical, or social aspects of play and learning find that basic creativity is the same for everyone. Whether we are dropping paint soaked old teabags from a great height to create something entirely random as a group, or doing something on a smaller scale that involves eye droppers and food dye - and everything in between, there's no obvious 'wrong' way to make the creation you have in your head. We have to all read and write basically the same to be understood. Mathematics is rigid in right and wrong answers, as are the sciences and history/geography. But to create something from your own thoughts is a bit magical in a way, and it's the process of learning how to use the tools at your disposal, to make whatever you like that's important.

Thats the reason I love trees, at primary school a teacher told a lad off in my class for painting a picture of a tree wrong. I never understood what she meant, a tree cant be wrong. Another teacher (or maybe the same dolt) told another lad off for painting a big piece of blue sugar paper blue. I wasnt comfortable with that either, but i think those 2 incidences shaped how I think about art and creativity more than anything else :rolleyes:

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