Jump to content
Home
Forum
Join Us
Articles
About Us
Tapestry

Arm in cast in risk assessment


Wildflowers
 Share

Recommended Posts

We have had this in the past, and had a long chat with the child's Mum to see what specific risks we needed to take into account. It depends on the length of time the cast has been on, as in the early days, the risk seems to be more on the child getting their cast knocked and wet etc, whereas later on the risk is more to other children getting bashed accidentally!

 

You need to take into account the usual mobility of the child - are they generally very active? Do they enjoy playing in sand and water etc? Do they like quiet floor play, looking at books, doing jigsaws?

 

Look at your room and outdoor setup and see what there is that you may need to consider. You may not realise dome of it until the child is actually there, so encourage your staff to verbalise what they see - 'aah, playdough - not a good plan perhaps!' Type of thing as they extricate him from the dough table.

 

Of course he may be more subdued than normal, and just want to snuggle quietly, so you will need to be aware of that. You'll need a member of staff available to watch him closely for the first few sessions to gauge what support he needs

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is what I ended up putting into the risk assessment, as measures taken if we have a child with a limb in a cast:

 

Protective sleeve worn to keep cast dry when outside and when near water and wet materials.

Child with cast made aware of own limitations and closely supervised.

Inappropriate activities avoided.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with Cait -we had a child in a cast at the end of last term and it was a case of speaking to dad about what specific risks we needed to take into account - he's a quiet boy who likes activities like small world, books,puzzles so that helped. we just made sure that we supported him when needed - toilet was one area as he was unable to pull his trousers up/down (we asked dad to put him in elasticated bottoms as that made it easier) but we just added notes as we became aware of what and where he needed support.

i will say that children are very adaptable and probably cope better than an adult with a limb in a cast.

Edited by blondie
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My daughter broke her elbow and I just kept her off Preschool - it was easier for them! Ha! She wasn't supposed to run, but that's all she ever does, and her favourite activities were sand and water... She wouldn't have taken kindly to not being allowed to do these (she has asd) so it was best all round for her not to go.

 

That said, definitely chat to the parents to find out what difference the cast will make before you make any changes :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

well i received an email today from a parent and guess what -her son has broken his arm/elbow and wanted to know about him coming to pre-school lol :D

the only thing is he isn't a quiet boy who likes to sit around doing puzzles, small world etc., he is a very active energetic boy so guess i am going to have to have a chat with mum :unsure:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. (Privacy Policy)