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Selects a particular named shape. (40-60) etc


marley
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Hi

Just wondered how you would interpret

Selects a particular named shape. (40-60)

I think eg child chose a triangle to be the top of the rocket and a square for the body of the rocket and could talk about why they had chosen that particular shape?

Any other thoughts/ideas?

As a staff team of only 2 I must say I value the discussion about these statements...especially as some seem to be the same as others. I have now kept a record of all those discussed on here as a way of moderating ourselves.

Thanks everyone. Keep up the hard work.

 

 

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precisely as mouseketeer! i keep for moderation purposes too. am in a cluster but seems to be more reception orientated. so useful. our children are often better at naming shapes than describing as parents do this at home, and remembering a shape name is easier than describing it

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Just bare in mind that if the 'rocket' is a 3D model that you would not be talking about triangles etc but most probably cones and cubes If the child is manipulating eg bricks and boxes and calling them triangles and squares, then I would think they haven't yet understood the difference between 2D and 3D shape.

I assumed in this case child was making a picture of a rocket?

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I would say that's 'Uses shapes appropriately for tasks' (30-50) and that 'Selects a particular named shaped' (40-60) was if i asked for a shape they could give me the correct one ...but that could be well be wrong :/

So what do you think is the difference between them? I have three year old that could give me a square shape if I asked them for it. What makes this a 40-60 statement? Surely there must be more to it?? Hence why I was asking?!!! We all think differently about these statements :-)

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Just bare in mind that if the 'rocket' is a 3D model that you would not be talking about triangles etc but most probably cones and cubes If the child is manipulating eg bricks and boxes and calling them triangles and squares, then I would think they haven't yet understood the difference between 2D and 3D shape.

I assumed in this case child was making a picture of a rocket?

Yes was thinking collage etc but would also be explaining flat and solid and 2/3d shapes if using bricks etc

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Nothing other than the statement 'selects a particular named shape' is in the 40-60m band, and it seemed self explanatory to me, but maybe not, if a child was making a collage and selected a circle, saying "it's the sun", I'd be recording it as the 30-50m 'uses shape appropriately....', if they put a square and told me its the sun i wouldn't be, but then I think its easier for a child to give you basic shapes than actually use them as we'd expect, so I don't really agree that the statements are the right way around anyway......but don't get me started on that ;p

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ok for my interpretation!

using shapes....putting triangle shapes on top of 'houses'

creating a circle with logs for camp fires

putting a triangle or square flag on top of a sandcastle etc

...also using cones for ice creams and creating things with waste craft using appropriate 3d shapes

 

40-60

Can select a named shape so find a square etc (and i would expect them to be able to include those not used as often like hexagon etc)...i would also be looking as emerging knowledge of the difference between 2d/3d

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reading this tread: for the 40-60 I did wonder who is expected to do the naming - if it's the adult saying 'can you pass me a triangle please' at's a whole lot easier than the child saying 'I need a circle for the sun'.

It isn't something I've queried before, so very grateful to you all for raising it

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I hadn't seen this topic and posted one very similar just now. Thanks to finleysmaid for directing me here!

My query about this statement is which shapes should they recognise?

I would take the statement as meaning they can find and name a particular shape.

My school's reception class teachers think they should be about to name/recognise:

square, circle, triangle, rectangle, hexagon, pentagon, octagon, sphere, cube, cuboid, triangular prism, cone, cylinder.

Personally I think this is too many as I'm sure the Year 1/2 maths covers naming shapes like these. I previously would have said the basic shapes of triangle, circle, square, rectangle, oval, maybe a couple of 3D shapes such as cube, cone, cylinder, sphere.

I cannot find any guidance on this and it seems a bit unfair that some settings may expect far less than others...

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In this case, I would look at this statement in conjunction with others in the same age band such as

beginning to use mathematical names for solid shapes and flat shapes, and mathematical terms to describe shapes.

And

Uses familiar objects and common shapes to create and recreate patterns and build models.

If you take them together, then I would expect that selecting a named shape (whether named by adult, themselves or another child), would also include some 3D shapes to show their emerging knowledge. So the child who can select a triangle and square, can they also select a cylinder and cuboid?

In the 30-50 band, children may not yet have the language associated with shapes, ie may not be naming them yet, but you can still build with bricks even if you don't know what they are called. Children often show their understanding of shape via 3D first as these are more concrete, they can pick them up handle them, turn them over, build with them etc. Making pictures with 2d shapes is more abstract and for some children, they learn this later, depending on their experience, so the child above who cant make a house from a triangle and square, I would look at whether or not they can make one from some bricks, choosing something like a triangular prism for the roof, or telling you which shape (by picking it up not by naming it) they want to use for the roof.

I don't know if that helps or hinders, but that's how I would see it

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Wow! Lots of discussion here on this and glad I asked! Its great to get different professionals views on this.....however it does show how we all interpret it differently......which maybe why when a child comes to us from another setting which state he is progressing in the elg and we think more developing 40-60 ( based on initial assess....possibly we are expecting too much as other nursery have had this littlest boy for years) and at nursery he was getting 1:1 for this...it shows the difference. Mum says he is very ahesd of his peers and wants to see me next week to talk about this.Not sure if there is a right or wrong but looking at everyones ideas on this shows you what a big difference ininterpretation there is doesn't it! Problems arise when we don't agree with other settings or school ( who we also share some children with).

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OK - let's look at the 'National Numeracy Strategy - Mathematical Vocabulary' - I know the strategies aren't used anymore, but I'm sure child development hasn't changed because of it! Note - this is for Reception to Year 6, so does not mention F1.

'The words listed for each year include vocabulary from the previous year, with new words for the year printed in red. ... ...

RECEPTION

3D SHAPES - cube, pyramid, sphere, cone

2D SHAPES - circle, triangle, square, rectangle (note, not oblong - this, interestingly, appears in Year 4!), star ...

YEAR 1

Has the addition of cuboid and cylinder

No addition to 2D shapes - this comes in ...

YEAR 2

with pentagon, hexagon, octagon ...'

Hope that is of some use!

 

A link to this very useful publication ... ...

 

 

www.belb.org.uk/downloads/num_mathematics_vocabulary.pdf

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Just found this in the Year 1 Mathematics programme of study: Pupils should be taught to:

recognise and name common 2-D and 3-D shapes, including:

 2-D shapes [for example, rectangles (including squares), circles and triangles]

 3-D shapes [for example, cuboids (including cubes), pyramids and spheres].

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