Jump to content
Home
Forum
Join Us
Articles
About Us
Tapestry

Baseline assessment through observation


 Share

Recommended Posts

I am feeling a little overwhelmed by trying to get any of baseline assessment for my new reception cohort. I have pre-school records for just over half of them. They do all have some form of assessment about which age-band they are in. I will obviously use these although I confess to being sceptical about those records from one place - all 6 children are apparently meeting or exceeding the ELG in the prime areas and yet the written notes say things like 'X didn't spend much time at nursery due to having huge tantrums' for me - that isn't 'expected for Managing feelings and behaviour' so I'll be looking at those particularly ones more closely.

However, my question - I really want to get a baseline through observations/play and I think I'm setting out resources which should enable this but it's not working; especially not for the more able. I know I'm spending too much time with my Y1s (think I'm just going to have to abandon them this week and pray Ofsted don't turn up) but even so I'm feeling stuck trying to look at so many areas for so many children. I'm especially stuck for anything to do with writing.

Any suggestions/ideas/encouragement? I am very anxious about getting it wrong when I know that in 9 months time we'll be looking at their EYFSP and how much progress they made and I don't want to under or overestimate where they are.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi,

 

We have focused time with each child for the baseline. We set out activities like ordering big number tiles and jumping along them, counting animals into the farm etc so we can see clearly what they can do. Although it is focused and is adult initiated it is fun and the children enjoy working with us so it doesn't grate with me or make me think it doesn't fit with good play based early years practice. Could you not have focused activities set out to complete with them? Or would you prefer to do it through child initiated activity?

 

T13xxx

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Like teacher13 I set up adult led fun activities to assess the children' skills. When I have seen what they can do I also compare this to what they actually choose to do and their attitude to learning. For instance I have a boy who can write simple sentences when I 'make him' but left to his own devices he never visits writing activities and his attitude to writing sucks...due to a lot of hot housing at home. Therefore, even though his ability is verging on 40-60 secure, I will be base lining him at 40-60 entering because of his attitude to writing. You have to try and marry up what they are capable of with your observations. In an ideal world you would get all this from observations but in reality you only see the extent of children's capabilities when you 'set up' activities to assess this.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you for the reassurances/suggestions everyone; really appreciate the time. Had a nice chat with my HT this evening about how this year's going so far so I know he's aware of some of the issues.

If I've told/asked/cajoled a child to put their shoes back on ten times before they actually do it does this show limited Understanding/Listening and Attention but good Health and self-care?! ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi,

I do a bit of both in my Nursery Class. I don't tend to set-up activities as such just sit in an area with the resources I need available (e.g. number cards) and ask for some help with them - most children will come to visit me at some point or come with a friend if not by themselves!!

I agree with Catma, we have to be practical. The pressure is on to assess as quickly as possible and get going and there are things that can be quickly assessed by watching a set-up activity or leading play.

Green Hippo xxx

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We also provide appropriate challenges / learning opportunities for individual children which are their next step in a particular area. We call them 'games' and the children are keen to do them - the even ask 'to have a game'. We do them as we walk to the woods, whilst waiting for others, during snack or with any child who is not involved in play at any particular time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. (Privacy Policy)