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Sand Hats


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We don't currently use them but understand we will have to get some for the accreditation.

Other groups we know that have passed have said that you don't have to enforce their use, just provide them - is this the experience of others?

One group just has a box of caps that are also for the garden generally and although they had to fight their corner it was ok in the end.

 

We too have garden hats but don't really want to have to argue our case so...... can we just get some baseball caps or do we have to buy specific sand hats? If the latter, where can we get them???

 

Many thanks

Tracey

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By sand hats do you mean the French foreign legion style hat with neck protector? If so, I don't know where you get them from (bought 2 for my boys at the seaside shop at Studland Bay a few years ago!) but many schools seem to use them as standard summer hats - maybe you could ask locally?

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We bought plastic sand hats from GLS. We were questioned about head lice and if the hats would spread them!

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And what did you say...??!

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we use baseball caps, and children have quickly understood that they wear a hat when playing in the sand and hang it up once finished on hooks nearby.

 

it was not necessary for our accreditation or recommended in fact was seen as a novel way of controlling numbers in sand as well as preventing sand in eyes and hair. Our mentor had not seen this before and she is aslo a member of the accreditation board in our area.

 

(Our outdoor caps are legionaire style, flaps at back, bought from the same supplier as our t-shirts and have our logo on them. All wear them outdoors, and staff must all wear hats too... lead by example.)

 

 

Inge

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We argued that they did not spread lice. After a few weeks all the fuss, that the parents had made, died down and the children wore the sand hats without any fuss.

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Guess what, last year I bought 60 legionairre style hats in the view of selling them to the parents but they soon realised that I would let the children wear them anyway rather than go outside without one :o

 

Some parents have bought them and all the children do keep them on ( peer pressure) they are really useful when on outings to the park etc for quick head counts.

 

So, if anyone wants some I have plenty at £1:50 each + post and packaging (red or blue). They are also great for sand play because they have a peak and neck flap.

 

I await your orders :D:D

 

Peggy

 

p.s. PM me if interested

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Hali, Has the sun gone to your head????

 

My interpretation of a sand hat is "anything you wear on your head whilst playing with sand" ( to help prevent the sand getting into hair and eyes) :D

 

 

Peggy

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Hali, you're not mad hun! Part of the reason for starting this thread was to find out if there is a 'sand hat' or whether we can just allocate a set of any hats as sand hats.

 

At our setting, the children aren't allowed out in hot/sunny weather without a hat. If they haven't brought one, we have a box of donated ones!

 

So... do you make them wear them or are they simply provided and optional?

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Ohh Peggy :(:( :wacko: xD (have i just been told off) :o

 

Thank you Pandamonium. :D:D .... we do make ours wear sun hats when they are out and give them ours if they have not bought them..its just in my accreditaion inspection, officer said we needed to provide sand hats (so i was wonderong if they were somthing special..or normal hats) xD:(

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We are expecting ofsted in September - should I be buying 'sand hats' for the occasion - it's not something that's arisen before.

 

Whilst we're kind of on the subject :o (we alternate sand and water indoors) can I ask what everyone's policy is on children getting wet through water play during this very hot weather. I don't have a problem with it (within reason, and so long as the wettee and wetter are both happy) but my nursery nurse is contradicting me and telling children off and changing them. Surely when it's 30 degrees outside it's no great shakes?!?

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Our children make their own sand hats.

 

All you need is a small spade (and a sand tray!). If you judge the angle right you can shower all your friends' heads with a lovely layer of sand. Each is an original, one-off titfer that can be shaken off and thrown back on until the adults get fed up and suggest an alternative activity...

 

Maz

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Hi there, Chocolate Girl,

 

As a NN, here, I'm surprised at your NNs attitude anyway! We never tell the children off for this (unless upset has been caused, when we 'discuss' rather than tell off) and only change them in this kind of weather if they are uncomfortable. In fact, sometimes at other times of year the children don't want to be changed, at least, not until they've finished what they're doing. How does your NN think they're ever going to get anything out of the experience if they're always being jumped on to keep dry and get changed???

 

And Maz - so do ours!! Mind you it does cause probs in some types of hair - I have been suggesting hats of some type for sand play for ages, but the powers-that-be are jittery of headlice.....

 

 

Sue :o

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Sue

 

I am soooooooo pleased to hear from you!! :) Having never worked with a NN before Easter I am still trying to ascertain whether me smiling sweetly whilst boiling inside is an over-reaction to her attitudes to the children getting wet/dirty etc. May I please ask you advice on how to discuss 'issues' with her, as I have a meeting scheduled with her on Thursday, which I know will have her exploding (previous experience has shown me this, despite my diplomacy). But I cannot have her stopping children doing things as it doesn't suit her; I spent a good while making some shakers at home (yes, I know it should've been a children's activity) and she is constantly taking them away after a couple of minutes as they are 'giving me a headache', to the point where I actually had to search for them this week (she had hidden them!!) when I had planned to have musical instruments as an activity. :o This week I questioned her when she was throwing away some of our junk because she was 'tidying up' and the junk box was over-flowing.

 

Help!!! xD

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Oh, dear!!

 

Unfortunately, she is by no means unique, but that doesn't excuse her attitude at all! May I ask how old she is? - I'm not being ageist, either, just look ay my profile xD My response to the overflowing junkbox would've been to initiate some junk-modelling!!

In my experience, it can be quite difficult changing this sort of attitude, especially when there appear to be 'valid' reasons for it e.g. 'If we don't change them they'll be cold/sore/uncomfortable' ; 'They're just making a racket, not any sort of rhythm' - how else are they going to learn??? etc etc, expect you know what I mean.

Maybe you could 'discuss' generally your approach to teaching - if you've not been working with her long, this might seem a good opportunity to approach this matter. You could ask to discuss your approach to next term's work, perhaps? Whatever, you are the Teacher, and as such you have the last word! (Says me, who has nearly come to blows with an overbearing Teacher in the past!!- Sshhh!!) It's possible she feels intimidated, as the NN, (not that that's ever stopped me :o ) and wants to appear 'in control' in front of you. Don't know if that's any help?

Please PM any time if you want to talk further. Anyone else got any good ideas??

 

Sue :D

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We put the instruments outside when noise becomes an issue :D

 

As to the water fun, I'd say run with it! One of mine sat down in the paddling pool with her skirt on last week - I just asked her why she hadn't taken her skirt off first! We have a washing line for wet clothes and the children all have PE kits... :o

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My sentiments exactly ASPK!

For one reason or another I ended up having the Head as my 'other adult' on Thursday for a bit :o ; he was outside with the children and said to me "Hope you don't mind - they're getting a bit wet." He obviously had no problem with it either.

 

I love this site!!!! I feel so much better already! You're all great!:D

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hmmm well I don't know the pc answer but I also think it's fine as long as both parties are happy! I'd be a bit more concerned inside with slipping risks but outside it's fun!!

Our leaver's party was a paddling pool and the slide with a plastic sheet extension. We then hooked up a hose on mist setting so it sprayed over the top of it, the children then had to go thru the mist to go down the slide wheeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee! We were all drenched and it was great!

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Hali, Sorry, I didn't mean to offend- We have difficulty in keeping sun hats on with our lot, but they really do save burnt scalps, face and necks.

 

Chocolate Girl - I have a notice up for parents stating Paddling pool out today- please bring a change of clothes when picking up as your child will be wet, cool and happy :D:D ( we keep T-shirts on outdoors to avoid sun burn)

 

Once on a hot day a girl in my group took off her T-shirt ( we were indoors) I had an unnanounced visit from 2 Ofsted Inspectors, their comment was "Is that appropriate?" (indicating the child), I obviously looked puzzled and they continued to ask if I thought it could be a child protection issue ( half dressed). I explained that she was hot. I wanted to ask if they had ever been to a local beach in the summer (but I had experienced so much hassle from them I didn't dare!!).

 

The staff discussed the implications of this comment and decided that to ask a child to keep her T-shirt on would possibly cause a feeling of shame about her body and agreed that the inspectors were a bit OTT. What do you think?

 

Peggy

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I wonder if some of these inspectors are human! At the pool party we invited the local paper and he was a bit iffy that the kids were in swimsuits but that's a bit different! As a lot of the parents were there and didn't object we put those kids in the front!!

Inside tho, I agree that asking kids to stay covered could make them ashamed of their bodies.

 

Going back to that nursery nurse - I was also going to say you're the teacher! I'm NNEB and have been really lucky with teachers I've worked with. I was nanny to one who really valued her nursery nurses and acknowledged that we have different skills and knowledge. But at the end of hte day, you are the teacher and she needs to get her head out of her bum and think of the kids! Is she thinking that school shouldn't be fun do you think? Perhaps just feels threatened by your obvious superbness and wants to exert her authority with the kids... you know how people are really strict on children because that's the only control they can have? ooer getting a bit deep now!!

Do you now what I mean tho? I guess it's like bullying....

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