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Glueing Area


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Hi

 

Im an NQT with a boy-heavy class. I've had some feedback that my gluing area could be better, and Im wondering what kind of stuff others have in theirs and what you do to entice children in. We have; feathers, wool, tissue, sequins, paper, those polysterine things from packaging, recycled boxes to use etc. I think one of the issues is that the recycled packaging is stored under the work top, and although they're in a clear unit and can be seen, children have to go in to get them out. Putting the boxes out onto the gluing table might be better.

 

Grateful for any tips.

 

Thanks

RG

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I think people call their gluing area different things such as workshop, DT area etc. and may combine other activities within it. I think that if you go to the Resources section and look under Enjoy and Achieve for Continuous Provision, you will find that there are some plans by various people which would help you. Bev and Laura have some very useful documents, and a more simple CP plan was added by me years ago, which might give you a good starting point, under Collage/Craft/Modelling.

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we have all sorts, cd, different types of glue (runny sticky) different types of tape (masking tape is really usefull for children who find sticky tape hard to cut as they can tear it), saw dust, flowers, leaves, twigs, tea, lentils, coffee, split peas, wrapping paper, photos, post cards, greetings cards, starch puffs (packaging dip in water they stick together), boxes, tobes coloured cellophane, straws, shearing elastic, different types of scissors, tissue paper, string, wool, ribbons, herbs & spices, coloured sand, ordinary sand...sounds like a lot but we have one of those little units (a bit like a book case) with nine small open topped drawers in it and we have all the bits in sections...one for natural materials one for plastic, one for pulses etc, then children just self select. For the first few weeks it was a mess as everything got pulled out but now they have got used to it they seldom mess it up.

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Hi

 

Im an NQT with a boy-heavy class. I've had some feedback that my gluing area could be better, and Im wondering what kind of stuff others have in theirs and what you do to entice children in. We have; feathers, wool, tissue, sequins, paper, those polysterine things from packaging, recycled boxes to use etc. I think one of the issues is that the recycled packaging is stored under the work top, and although they're in a clear unit and can be seen, children have to go in to get them out. Putting the boxes out onto the gluing table might be better.

 

Grateful for any tips.

 

Thanks

RG

 

Have you ever tried putting your recycled packaging on the floor together with masking tape and scissors - we find this works really well - the children tend to do the 'construction bit' on the floor and then move to the 'creative table' to add more! xD

 

we have all sorts, cd, different types of glue (runny sticky) different types of tape (masking tape is really usefull for children who find sticky tape hard to cut as they can tear it), saw dust, flowers, leaves, twigs, tea, lentils, coffee, split peas, wrapping paper, photos, post cards, greetings cards, starch puffs (packaging dip in water they stick together), boxes, tobes coloured cellophane, straws, shearing elastic, different types of scissors, tissue paper, string, wool, ribbons, herbs & spices, coloured sand, ordinary sand...sounds like a lot but we have one of those little units (a bit like a book case) with nine small open topped drawers in it and we have all the bits in sections...one for natural materials one for plastic, one for pulses etc, then children just self select. For the first few weeks it was a mess as everything got pulled out but now they have got used to it they seldom mess it up.

 

Oh can I come and play - oh please.......all sounds fantastic! :o

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What about magazines to cut stuff out for sticking....if you have boy heavy group ask parents for discarded car/sport magazines or swing by car dealerships and ask if they have old car brochures that you could use....is that a bit stereotypical....sorry

 

Junk modelling is good in art area....as other have said add tape but also split pins (may need a little demo as to how to use) elastic bads etc and then they can glue stuff onto models

 

Can you tie some resources into your topic...ie Autumn....leaves etc

 

Good luck with it all

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Not sure of your space but we have had some old carpet inners in the past. They can be sawn to any size you like and make some fantastic creations, with differing sized boxes. Can also be used for small world enhancements such as ramps for vehicles, or placed in your outside area for den making.

We have found when our preschool is boy heavy not having it at a table but on the floor works well, with lots of tape, string, ribbon.

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Some great ideas which I will pinch if I may, especially like the idea of having junk modelling on the carpet with masking tape.

 

One point for discussion might be whether to include the polystyrene packaging material you mention that you provide. A couple of years ago I went to some length to try to find out whether these should be used in settings, ie myth or fact. I contacted all sorts of safety organizations for their opinions or guidelines. I could find very few guidelines linking to these directly but on balance decided to adopt the PLA's stance which was not to include them because they represent a choking hazard to children. Food for thought!

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Some great ideas which I will pinch if I may, especially like the idea of having junk modelling on the carpet with masking tape.

 

One point for discussion might be whether to include the polystyrene packaging material you mention that you provide. A couple of years ago I went to some length to try to find out whether these should be used in settings, ie myth or fact. I contacted all sorts of safety organizations for their opinions or guidelines. I could find very few guidelines linking to these directly but on balance decided to adopt the PLA's stance which was not to include them because they represent a choking hazard to children. Food for thought!

 

 

Thanks very much for all these really great suggestions. It has taken me a while to work out how to view reply posts (new to this!) so sorry for slow reply. Thanks again, it is so helpful to have a place to ask these questions! :o

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One point for discussion might be whether to include the polystyrene packaging material you mention that you provide.

 

None of the LA's I have worked for have allowed the use of polystyrene for some years now. I think that, as well as the problem of inhaling bits if the polystyrene breaks up, there is also the danger of minute amounts of fumes being inhaled, and styrene is thought to be implicated as a carcinogen. Presumably in large amounts, as it is used widely in packaging. I expect it is a case of erring on the side of caution.

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