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Worrying Behaviour


diesel10
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Does anyone know why a child would flap (hands) stamp (feet) at times.

 

It's mostly when sitting eating lunch and waiting to do something. The child is 3 y 8m.

 

He is a chatty child (although mostly out of context) enjoys playing alongside friends mostly outside. He is not able to follow instructions very easily.

 

I have asked our area SENCO and she has seen him doing it but didn't give a reason.

 

 

Any ideas?

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Dyspaxia springs to mind. We had a child like that many yeas ago, he mostly flapped his arms when he was running though. He was quite unco-ordinated too and needed eye contact so we could be sure he'd heard us, but even then he had to be gently turned to keep the eye contact.

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might be that this is just what he does when excited...but doubt it! :o you titled this worrying behaviour...you need to follow up if this is worrying you and the parents. I have had several flappers over the years most have turned out to have an additional need xD

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Thanks for your replies.

 

It has concerned me for a while. I have carried out lots of obs and called the area Senco in twice. Although today she said if it was my child I would get it looked into and then said lets not focus on it yet????? She sent him for a S & L assessment but nothing came of it. When I asked his Mum about the flapping today she said she wasn't worried about it as his friend does it aswell???

 

Area senco is coming back in September for a further review. From my reading I think it may be Dyspaxia, so it was interesting that the first reply included this.

 

I am going to do an IEP for motor skills for the rest of the term.

 

Thanks again

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Children flap for a number of different reasons - boredom, excitement, fear, comfort and just because they like it.

As EYFS 1966 said you should keep a note of occurrences and try to see what is happening as he begins to flap or stamp, it may help you understand him; does he have any other repetative actions or strict routines?

I would also note down :-

-examples of when his speech is out of context, is it out of context because he hasn't understood, you say he can't follow instructions easily or is fixated on certain subjects and he talks about his interests no matter what you have asked.

- his play, you said he plays along side does he join in with imaginative play? does he talk as he plays and is he making up a narrative or using one he has watched or heard. How does he respond when you join in, will he let you lead the play.

-does he understand about emotions and how other people are feeling?

 

You are obviously worried, are his parents? have you thought about a speech and language assessment as he has problems understanding instructions and possibly social communication?

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Does anyone know why a child would flap (hands) stamp (feet) at times.

 

It's mostly when sitting eating lunch and waiting to do something. The child is 3 y 8m.

 

He is a chatty child (although mostly out of context) enjoys playing alongside friends mostly outside. He is not able to follow instructions very easily.

 

I have asked our area SENCO and she has seen him doing it but didn't give a reason.

 

 

Any ideas?

 

It's called "stimming" and you can read more about it here... http://www.myspecialsweetpea.com/stimming.html

 

Nona

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Thanks for that interesting link, Nona. I've never come across this term before but it's good to have a name to put on this type of behaviour and to be able to direct parents to the information.

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