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Positive Images Of Disability


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Hi

During my recent Ofsted inspection, I was told that I needed more positive images of disability. The only thing I have found is a B&W photo of a very institutionalised pair of children, and the Balamory crew. According to the others in my area 'Positive images' is the current buzz word!

 

Any ideas?

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I often cut out images from suppliers' catalogues to present positive images. Not sure I've seen any for disability though - maybe the specialist SEN catalogues? I'm sure there must also be websites you could tap into...

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Hi Aunty Ruby -

 

About 5 years ago the Sunday Times (I think) brought out a calendar with a different disabled person every month doing something exciting and different. One of them featured a friend of ours who has cerebral palsy, diving in scuba gear with sharks around him (in fact he was in one of the sealife aquaria places). He was about 13 years old at the time!

 

I'll try to find out if it's possible to still get hold of the pictures - I think they would be really great! :)

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Hi Ruby,

If you have £75 you can buy a resource pack with lots of good pics called "All Equal, All different" produced by Disability Equality in Education (DEE) see page 15, this months Practical Preschool.

 

I had this comment when inspected with regard to positive images of people from different cultures. I pointed out the pictures of children on the wall, they were from 5 different cultures and all attended the setting. I then went on to speak to her about the importance of true "inclusiveness" and not "tokenistic gestures" to please inspectors. She then accused me of having Handa's Surprise on my book shelf as being a "token gesture", I referred her to the planning and reminded her that our topic was "Fruit" and that is why the book was out. She then counted all my "little people" in the small world area, she was going to say there was not enough representation of different cultures until she found two thirds were of "white" ethnicity and one third of various others, she also found "Tim" who sits in a wheelchair but plays with all the other "little people". Need I say we didn't see eye to eye.

 

I would expect this attitude from Inspectors 5-10 yrs ago but to hear that "positive images of anyone "different" is a buzz word now dismays me. How can someone think that "inclusive practice" is somehow "specifically" proven? Surely inclusion is embedded in the WHOLE practice of the setting.

 

Peggy

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Sorry, I thought stuff like books, puzzles, pictures etc was fine!

 

If you haven't got those, then I would suggest you do, soonest, otherwise - how else???

 

Sue

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Hmm -

That's a very good point Peggy - I'll have to sit in a dark room for a while and worry about why that wasn't my instant response! :o

 

By the way Sue - I see you've crossed the bridge and are viewing your 2001st post! Congratulations, and hope you like the new icon! :D

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Steve, If I featured in a calender, I would want as many people to see it as possible. I am sure your friend was and still is very proud of his achievement. I can't even scuba dive ( well, never tried) let along near sharks.

 

Peggy

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The calendar sounds great Steve. Personally I don't think you can beat images of real people (children and adults) doing a whole range f things.

 

peggy, in one of my errr ...momenst (cant say blonde, wont say senior), i didnt get what you meant about inclusiveness being specifically proven?

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Thank you guys,

Thanks Peggy, I had read the info about the £75 pack after I had sent the posting, Mmm a little expensive for a small setting.

 

The calender sounds great, I'd be interested in finding a copy.

 

Thanks Carol the bear is lovely.

 

Can I just say that I am so glad I found this site, there are so many friendly people offering such good advice.

 

Cheers,

Aunty :o

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Mundia, What I was trying to say is that to provide a feeling of "inclusiveness" in our settings is not just about having "specific" posters, books, play people etc of different abilities, cultures etc. It is by having the right "attitude" towards all the children and adults, with regard to their very many individual differences. The most important thing is to show "positive" value and respect through our own actions.

I'm not saying no to positive images and posters, books, but to not feel we have "met" this obligation because of having these resources, it lies much deeper than that.

Hope this doesn't sound too much like a sermon, but the use of some terminology is an issue for me, such as "Inclusiveness, "equal opportunities". It doesn't mean anything if we are asked to "prove" it with the above methods only.

 

Peggy

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I know what you mean Peggy. I think I've probably told this before but, a couple of years ago on an Equal Ops course, while talking about how to ensure the settings resources showed all cultural ranges, we should choose somebody within our setting to be responsable for checking that the books showed a reflection off society. Anybody could do the job, but if say we had one male member of staff, we could give him the job because he wouldnt want to sit with the female staff at lunch time listening to womens talk. :o

I was gobsmaked at such a blatant disregard for gender while on an equal op's meeting. To my everlasting regret I didnt say anything xD

I much prefer to practice what I preach rather than to make sure the right books and posters are displayed.

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Here Here!!

 

Well put, my thoughts exactly, just because you put up a poster, doesnt mean that you are in agreement/acceptance/cant think of the word etc of the people the posters portray. In my mind it goes much further than that, and yes I agree we must practice what we preach, after all anyone can put up a poster!

 

Still I suppose they need to find something to put on the inspection form, and this seems to be the in topic. xD:o

 

Aunty

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We also had this comment after our Ofsted last year. The inspector helpfully suggested we got hold of the Little Tikes School Bus which has a wheelchair ramp and a little wheelchair which any of the passengers can be put in. I bought one and have found it to be popular with the children and a good sturdy toy- it only cost about £14.

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Thanks Deb, :)

I shall look for one, little tikes usually are good quality.

 

I have found that the Balamory board game quite popular, but it has to be an adult led activity.

 

Aunty

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  • 5 months later...

Have just recieved my information pack from Whizz Kidz for their blue and yellow week. we support this charity most years and the pack contains a lot of pictures of children with various disabilites in a positve way. Also gives a few acitivites to do with children which we adapt to our age range of 3-4.

More info go to Whizz Kidz

 

Inge

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Thanks for the link Inge,

Not so much about disability acknowledgement, but about minorities feelings of exclusion, I found a publication on the DFES site ( I think, can't remeber what is was called) anyway it was about feelings and there were about 140 pictures of children of different ages showing a variety of expessions.

What struck me however was that I would say two thirds of the pictures were of children from a variety of ethnic groups and one third of what appeared to be of white british origin. I actually felt a sense of exclusion because of the high representation of ethnicity other than my own.

Is this P.C. gone too far ( from a Government site) or is this a true representation of the balance of our society now, or am I being too sensitive? It certainly made me think about how one feels if they are "in the minority".

 

Here are the pictures see what you think. It's quite a large attachment and you need Adobe 6 to open it.

 

 

Peggy

feelings_photocards_with_questions.pdf

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You're not the only one feeling that Peggy. Several of my parents have commented on the whole multi cultural issue. We actually don't have any minority groups at our setting yet we are expected to devote quite a large proportion of our planning to such issues. I know it is important but I have concerns that the majority are being marginalised in the process. Whatever happened about representing the children attending the setting and valuing their home lives?? :o

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Here here Peggy, Beau, Aunt Ruby et al -

 

I don't know whether anyone read the "controversial" Trevor Phillips (Chair of the new Single Equality Commisions) speech at the Conservative or was it Labour annual shindig on the new Single Equality and Human Rights Commission (yes I know I am sad but I was doing equality of opportunity as a module at the time) - made very interesting reading and a complete turnabout to everything that has been promoted so far - reading between the lines makes far more sense to me. He was suggesting that the country had gone overboard in their thinking on promoting racial diversity e.g. questioning whether the fact that offices/settings having a Welcome poster in 15 languages actually really achieved anything, seems a little pointless when I think there are over 300 languages spoken in London anyway. He acknowledged that people are different but by promoting their differences in some way we are also promoting segregation, we should be looking at the things we have in common and promoting these common values. the same could be said for disabilities - of course there are differences but let's not look at stereotyping people with disabilities there are plenty of ways we can incorporate this into our curriculum without having to continually "prove" ourselves as Peggy said.

 

I think the fact that they have now created a Single Equality Commission incorporating the commission for racial equality, the disability rights commission, and the equal opportunitities commission speaks volumes. I look forward to seeing how this proceeds as I certainly think it is a step forward and in the right direction. Let's face it the current legislation regarding discrmination is outdated and too complicated and too much, it continually refers to what we should not do but does not really give us positive guidance on how we should promote it, although the Children's Act is a little more forward thinking I know and it is therefore left to individuals to design their own promotion as they see fit - clearly the case with this inspector but not necessarily very wise or informed I would say. I continually question myself and I know that sometimes my values need to be looked at and evaluated - therefore healthy discussions on these issues is a way forward. Perhaps this Ofsted inspector would be better at keeping abreast of what is happening here and now rather than looking to her tick list. Watch this space there is bound to be more changes on the way.

 

We used to have the little tikes set of disabled people - unfortunately, the wheel kept on coming off the wheel chair, the parents wondered why the skipping rope had broken (this was the blind person with the white stick) so it really achieved very little if adults couldn't recognise what they were supposed to be then I don't think the children would have a clue.

 

Sorry didn't answer your question I know and you were right to question the Ofsted inspector, I think I certainly would have done.

 

Nikki

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I like the sound of Trevor Phillips! Children seem to me to be naturally accepting of physical and racial differences - it's often the adults who are ignorant! Promoting common values seems eminently sensible to me :D I do believe in sharing cultural and religious diversity, though.

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Wish my mom read this forum! We bought our nephew age 6, a rugby ball for his birthday 3 days ago. 3 year old neice picked it up and my mom said, 'Thats a boys ball'. xD Myself and two sons all chorused 'No it isnt'. I think we shocked her a bit, we did shout it rather loudly :o Definitly need to educate acceptance and common ground, rather than point out differences. It surprises me that I grew up to be anything other than a woman, chained to the kitchen sink, wearing fluffy pink slippers and a house coat, having done all the housework and still with a smile fixed on place for when the man of the house returned from his days labouring. Yeah, right :(:(

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OK, I've had a quik look but am puzzled by the two camouflaged chameleon pics!!!

Are the feelings photos part of the SEAL resources?

41706[/snapback]

 

 

Page 93 and 95 Yes, Maybe it is the only way to portray the feeling of being 'Invisible', what do you think? I do think they are from the SEAL resources ( I download so much stuff I forget what is what!) I also think they are very very good photo's to use to learn about our emotions.

 

I like the sound of Trevor Philips too. I have diversity within my preschool, as does everyone..Diversity of character, ability, gender, social background, parentage ( spelling?-Single parent, Foster Parent, Mum & Dad, Grandparents as main carers etc), fashion style, behaviour, confidence, language ability, physical ability, cognitive ability, values & beliefs, etc etc etc ..and these are just within the majority of white English children.

I just value human life, adult and child, good and bad, and I think if any Aliens arrived on our planet I'd want to get to know and value them too.

Now there's a thought.

 

 

Peggy

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Edited by SmileyPR
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